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Calories in a Kabocha Squash?


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My mom bought a kabocha squash the other day, and I've been eating it all day yesterday, and had the last piece of squash today for breakfast (yeah, I know, I'm strange). I usually microwave my squash with a bit of cling-wrap and a bit of water, and finish it with a touch of salt; so no oil, butter, fats, nada! And, before I cook it I always weigh it to see how many calories I'm consuming.
So here's the thing... I'm a bit skeptical when it comes to the amount of calories the squash actually has. I'm having a hard time believing that it's only 30 calories per 85g serving (raw). Now, each time I have a piece of squash, it usually equates to about less than a pound (so... like 15oz) and CC translates that to 145 calories BUT, I've been logging it as 200 calories because it's hard to believe that something so delicious can be so low in calories.
So, my question to you is... can I fully trust that 85g/30cal is correct for a kabocha squash (raw)?
Am I doing the right thing by over estimating the caloric content of my squash?

Thanks in advanced guys. Hope you can help. :D

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#1  
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I'd say you can probably trust the CC food entry for a single ingredient food. A quick google search for nutritional data on kabocha squash shows those numbers in several places (although the sources for all of these could be the same)

Nutritiondata.com lists butternut squash at 11 calories per oz, so that's about 150 calories for a 15 oz serving. I expect most winter squashes are similar. On the other hand, I doubt you're skewing your numbers that badly by adding an extra 50 calories. That's probably within the margin of error for most people for a day's recording.

 

Thanks for replying and double checking for me. Also, your honesty is fully appreciated! :D

This squash is pretty much just like a pumpkin so calculating your calories as if you were eating a pumpkin would probably be the way to go!

Oh and you're not weird for eating squash for breakfast... I eat pumpkin EVERY morning for breakfast!! It's delicious and super energizing, don't you think?

#4  
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Sorry, but the information about kabocha and the calorie information is incorrect according to what I read on packages here in Japan when I buy it. If you buy a bag of frozen kobocha with no additives of any kind, 100 grams (3.5 oz.) is 83 calories (which would be 70 calories per 85 gram serving). I would not trust that the value of 30 calories is correct after reading the labels in Japanese.

Kabocha is sweeter and more carbohydrate rich than American pumpkin.

Original Post by orchid64:

Sorry, but the information about kabocha and the calorie information is incorrect according to what I read on packages here in Japan when I buy it. If you buy a bag of frozen kobocha with no additives of any kind, 100 grams (3.5 oz.) is 83 calories (which would be 70 calories per 85 gram serving). I would not trust that the value of 30 calories is correct after reading the labels in Japanese.

Kabocha is sweeter and more carbohydrate rich than American pumpkin.

But this is cooked frozen squash, correct?  Cooked food has less water and therefore would be more calorie dense per gram of squash as opposed to a raw one.

Oh wow, I roast my Kabocha squash and have always counted it as 30 calories per 3/4 cup.  I never gained anyweight from eating it ( and I eat like 7 servings of it in a day.  I only get it once a week. Muaha, i'm a glutton. :D ). Hmmm....

I'm really curious, because I eat a LOT! I put down more than 6 kg worth of kabocha every weekend, counting it as 36 cals per 100g raw. Therefore if the count is anything above that, I'm screwed. However, I must point out that I eat normally throughout the rest of the week, and when I ate raw from Monday to Thursday, I still managed to lose 1 lb per week. I'm not sure if it's because I ate raw, because this week my weight stayed the same but I ate cooked all week... I'm scared now...

Squash, like most fruits and veg, is mostly water, so I think that sounds about right. I agree if its close in value to butternut squash or pumpkin, then its likely pretty close to right.

The frozen stuff has likely lost water as stated, and therefore would be more calorie dense.

Yea, it seems when I get squash premade and frozen- weather yellow , butternut or any kind- the fresh/ raw is much different.

I would guess its right given the amount of sights that say that it is 83 cals 100g. I have been on a major kick with Kabocha but definately feel "full" to say the least. I count it as 100 calories a cup- but that just seems low to me based on the texture, taste and density.

Either way it is sooooooooooo good!!! (Having a 600g divine dinner right now :D)

actually i was born in japan, and have inquired about this to experts as it was sort of bugging me.. in japan, it is said to be 91 calories per 100g raw.. in north america, it has yet to be added to the usda database.. i have spoken to a few professionals that have tested it to be just about equivalent to the calories in a sweet potato... so no, not 30, but more like 80-85cals/100g raw.. i think it is dependent on the percentage of dry matter in the squash...

Original Post by dragonfly22:

actually i was born in japan, and have inquired about this to experts as it was sort of bugging me.. in japan, it is said to be 91 calories per 100g raw.. in north america, it has yet to be added to the usda database.. i have spoken to a few professionals that have tested it to be just about equivalent to the calories in a sweet potato... so no, not 30, but more like 80-85cals/100g raw.. i think it is dependent on the percentage of dry matter in the squash...

So what is that equate to in cup measure? Did they compare the nutritional benefits similar also? Good for weight loss?

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