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How to count calories in homemade yogurt?


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I am wondering about this over a period of time.

I made yogurt myself in home using 500g of 1.5% milk. How much calories do it contain? Is it the same as the milk?

Also, same question for cottage cheese. 

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I would love to know the answer to this.  I think it is difficult to figure out.  I drain off much of the whey to get a thicker consistency which, I'm sure, makes the yogurt more calorie-dense.  

The mass of the end product should be the same as the milk, so if 240g (1c) of your milk has 140 calories, 240g of your yoghurt should have the same number of calories. That said, if you strain the yoghurt at all to make it thicker, you're removing water mass and ending up with a more concentrated product, so the calorie count per gram will change.

I can't speak for the cottage cheese, because I'm not familiar with the process of making it, but in general the principle is the same; if you remove any liquid while making it, the calorie count per gram will be higher than the original milk, but if you're simply changing the form of the product without removing anything, the calorie count per gram will remain the same.

Thanks, emsaurus - not as difficult as I thought it was going to be.  I'll just take the calories of the milk and divide by the number of servings in the finished product because even though I've drained off the whey, the total calories for the entire batch should remain the same.  

#4  
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I could be all wet here, but when you drain the yogurt, it's not just water. It is whey. I just checked the nutrition values for whey and it has 59 calories and 12 grams of sugar per cup. So, I would think that you are removing some calories.
thhq
Oct 24 2011 21:23
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#5  
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Milk math the calorie count way says that 500g of 1.5% milk is 230 calories. The enzymes in yogurt might eat a little bit of this, but I'd still call it 230 calories to avoid undercounting.

If you make the 500g of milk into cottage cheese, you lose the carbohydrates and some of the protein and keep most of the fat. I estimate the loss to be about 100 calories, leaving 130 calories of cheese.

I've never made cottage cheese, but have made a similar egg milk cheese. I use buttermilk to curdle the hot mix, then drain out the whey on a mesh strainer. The yield of cheese from a gallon of milk/buttermilk/eggs is very low. If I use skim milk I get about 2 cups of curds.

Making your own cottage cheese, you can probably just follow the same caloric guidelines for regular cottage cheese (provided you use a 'regular' fat amount milk and you have something with which to match it up).

For yogurt, the next time you make it, do this:

Measure the amount of milk you use. You'll want this measurement in cups (servings) and grams. Total calories = servings * calories per serving size (skim is around 90-100, 2% around 120-130).  Note: there are about 220 grams of milk in one cup (cups/servings of milk * 220 = grams of milk).

Next, how much yogurt are you adding? Add its calories to your total calories, add its mass (in grams) to the milk's mass.

Make your yogurt.

Drain whey into a separate container. Measure this whey (1 cup of whey = 246 grams). For each cup of whey, subtract 59 calories from your total calories. Subtract the cups of whey you removed from your total amount of yogurt and milk used earlier (you could use cups, but grams will be more exact).

Divide the remaining number of calories by the number of cups of yogurt you have left (milk + starter yogurt - removed whey = yogurt left; alternatively measure the yogurt you have now. these numbers should match).

Bam, calories per serving. Full equation:

Cal. per cup (220 g) = {[tot. cal. (milkcal+yogcal)] -  [removed cal. (wheycal)]} ....                                                   cups (units of 220g) of yogurt left  

Original Post by ktnavarette:

Making your own cottage cheese, you can probably just follow the same caloric guidelines for regular cottage cheese (provided you use a 'regular' fat amount milk and you have something with which to match it up).

For yogurt, the next time you make it, do this:

Measure the amount of milk you use. You'll want this measurement in cups (servings) and grams. Total calories = servings * calories per serving size (skim is around 90-100, 2% around 120-130).  Note: there are about 220 grams of milk in one cup (cups/servings of milk * 220 = grams of milk).

Next, how much yogurt are you adding? Add its calories to your total calories, add its mass (in grams) to the milk's mass.

Make your yogurt.

Drain whey into a separate container. Measure this whey (1 cup of whey = 246 grams). For each cup of whey, subtract 59 calories from your total calories. Subtract the cups of whey you removed from your total amount of yogurt and milk used earlier (you could use cups, but grams will be more exact).

Divide the remaining number of calories by the number of cups of yogurt you have left (milk + starter yogurt - removed whey = yogurt left; alternatively measure the yogurt you have now. these numbers should match).

Bam, calories per serving. Full equation:

Cal. per cup (220 g) = {[tot. cal. (milkcal+yogcal)] -  [removed cal. (wheycal)]} ....                                                   cups (units of 220g) of yogurt left  

That's an interesting equation but it didn't work for me as I used 104 g dry milk(=4cups+) and fluid skim milk combination. Even if it did work, it only gives calories and not nutrition.

Original Post by shivam3d:

I am wondering about this over a period of time.

I made yogurt myself in home using 500g of 1.5% milk. How much calories do it contain? Is it the same as the milk?

Also, same question for cottage cheese. 

I get 5 cups of yogurt and 7 c. of whey as can be seen in Recipe section.

I've tried  to calculate percentages of components left in yogurt from the start of milk and what is yielded in Whey but it was easier to edit concentrations in my homemade stuff and plug in values from TotalFage, if making fat free yogurt. Yogurt is yogurt and the values should be pretty close in spite of commercial additives.

I used to make individual cups of yogurt and did not filter whey, then just used the value of milk as it is essentially the same.

 

It does work if you use grams. Also, you can make it work for the rest of the nutrition by subtracting out total grams of nutritive items lost from the whey removed out of the total original products used and then dividing by the number of servings (again, based in grams because of the addition of the dry-ingredient to the wet ingredients), but this has to be done in separate equations since you're using different variables.

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