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How do you eat a Persimmon?


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So persimmion's went on sale at the local grocer.  I bought one and now I have absolutly no idea how to eat it.  Do you just bite right in?  Do you remove the peel?  Does it need to be cooked?

And how do you tell a ripe persimmon from one that is over or under ripe?  The one I bought is very hard.  the color is pale orange and the leaves are dried up brown with black edges.

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Hmm, apparently there are different types of persimmon's.   This one is a Sharon persimmon.
There are a number of names, and slightly different shapes, but the taste is pretty similar between all of them. (sharon, persimmons, kaki) ALthough I think persimmons is the older english name, and traditiaonlly they used to have big black seeds which the modern ones don't.

you can eat it a number of ways, normally if they are firm I just wash them and cut into 8ths (cutting towards the bit with the leaves) then you can just pull off each section and eat like that.

If they are really ripe you can eat them with a spoon.

Regarding ripeness it depends what you like. My mum likes them really ripe. I discovered later that firmish is my favourite way.

THey are also good, if they are overripe, if you freeze them a bit first and then eat them.
I don't really like the ones with the more pointed bottom, but if the ones you bought have the flat bottom, you can just peel off the skin and eat it!  I like them best when they're cruncy because the more ripe they get, the juicier they are, and I end up getting a mess all over my hands when I peel.

Alright then, here I go:

*CRUNCH*

Hmm, starts out something like a pear and finishes something like a mango.  The texture is all pear though.  An interesting flavor.  Thanks for the advice jane3001.

Wait a minute, you're not supposed to eat the peel Christine?
Lol I think it's just a personal preference. I usually eat the peel. I prefer them firm but the soft ones are good for making persimmon bread/cookies.
Thanks for the thread Knowan....I've never had a persimmon and have been curious.  From all the info in the replies I think I'll pick one up and check 'em out.  I'm always looking for new foods (mostly fruits/veggies).
There's more than one kind of persimmon. A fuyu persimmon is eaten like an apple, with the skin. I don't know about Sharon persimmon. 
Watch out for the different varieties! I took a big bite out of a firm persimmon and it was terrible. It dried out my entire mouth and I spent the next ten minutes trying to get the taste out of my mouth. Apparently, it was one of the varieties that can only be eaten once it has gotten soft. Now I have to work up the courage to try again.
Celerymonster's right - it is a personal preference.  For some reason, I'm not so into the texture of the persimmon skin, so I just peel it off.

i buy Fuyu persimmons
sometimes they're dark red, squishy, gloopy, and very ripe
other times they're light orange, hard, and crunchy/juicy

its the only kind of persimmon ive ever tried and i'll eat them either way

i just bite into them. no peeling or nonsense like that :P

Mmmmm... i love it when these are in season.  Funnily enough I am just back from a trip to my fruit and veg shop to buy some, but he is all out.

I personally cut them in half down the middle and eat all the insides out with a spoon, but my boyfriend just washes the fruit and eats the entire thing.

YUM.

I found you a recipe for cooked persimmon (Sharon Fruits). Sounds yummy and might make a nice change. The Sharon Fruit is quite sweet so you could probably get away with using less than a cup of sugar and replacing it with more than a cup of persimmon pulp.

Think I might try this... I can feedback later :)

Persimmon Cookies

1 tsp. Baking soda
1 cup Sieved persimmon pulp
1/2 cup Butter or margarine
1 cup Sugar
1 Egg
2 cup Flour
1 tsp. Baking powder
1/2 tsp. Salt
1/2 tsp. Ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. Ground cloves
1/2 tsp. Ground nutmeg
1 cup Raisins and/or nuts.

Stir soda into persimmon pulp and set aside. Cream butter and sugar together.
Beat in egg, then persimmon mixture.
Sift flour with baking powder, salt, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg.
Add to creamed mixture along with raisins or nuts. Mix thoroughly.
Drop by teaspoons onto greased baking sheets and bake at 350F 8 to 10 minutes.

I've only ever had persimmon pudding.

It's delicious.

 

i'm such a lush, the only thing i'd ever thought about making with them is persimmon dacquairis. (but don't have blender so have never tried).

but i bet they would be pretty yummy. if anybody has had one, i would love to know how it was.
persimmons are my absolutely favorite fruit if not food.  I prefer the Fuyu variety because they can be eaten under ripe while other varieties will be so bitter they make you toenails curl if they are under ripe.... pure manna from heaven I just peel and eat them out of hand
I prefer the Hachiya (sp?) variety.  They are acorn shaped, and you have to wait until they are so mushy you think they've gone bad before you can eat them.  And then peel and eat.  So good. 
Original Post by rsauvageot:

Watch out for the different varieties! I took a big bite out of a firm persimmon and it was terrible. It dried out my entire mouth and I spent the next ten minutes trying to get the taste out of my mouth. Apparently, it was one of the varieties that can only be eaten once it has gotten soft. Now I have to work up the courage to try again.

It was not ripe yet.  Those are the ones my great-grandmother used to have in her yard ... wowZA they are TOUGH when they're still green!!

So sorry you had to experience that.  My mother tells me that when she was younger growing up with that persimmon tree, she had a mean older cousin who would play tricks on the little kids by getting them to eat green persimmons.  Cruel and unusual punishment!

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