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Eating Baked Potatoe Every Night UnHealthy?


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I eat a Large baked potatoe with nothing on it because i love the taste by itself and don't feel it needs butter or cheese, thats just wasted toppings. Is it healthy to eat a Large Baked Potatoe every night? 

 I also do Situps and Push ups every night, so i would be burning cals late at night.

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#1  
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Yes, it's fine.

as long as you're keeping your calories balanced. Don't JUST eat carbs, but have some protein too :) and some fats even ;)

#3  
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I usually eat the Large Baked Potatoe with Swordfish Peas and Brocoli.

Sure, why would you think it would be unhealthy?

How large are we talkin'?  You might feel more satisfied if you ate a medium potato with a little bit of butter on it.  And if you're not getting enough fat in your diet this would be a good thing to have.
i have a potato EVERY NIGHT. i literally never miss a single night. i try and make it so the rest of my dinner won't have too many carbs, or at least starchy carbs, so that i wont feel like i've had an overload of starch.

but yeah, its healthy :)
#6  
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I've read that potatoe turns to sugar and weight gain -- something to that effect.

So, If you just have a potato with some protein in it and add a little veggie, then, you're saying this would be a balanced meal by itself?

Original Post by lilsgammy:

I've read that potatoe turns to sugar and weight gain -- something to that effect.

certain foods don't automatically "convert" to fat and make you gain weight.

#8  
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Original Post by lilsgammy:

I've read that potatoe turns to sugar and weight gain -- something to that effect.

Sugar-- that's a half truth. Weight gain-- that's a myth. If you are overeating then yes you are going to gain weight. If you are following a healthy, calorie restricted diet then potatoes are not going to make you gain weight.

French fries every night.. now that would make you gain weight due to consuming a bazillion calories.

Ok.  I read a lot of confusion and what I think are partial truths in this thread.  Let me share what I know about  the biochemistry behind sugar, starch and weight gain.

Bottom line:  Is eating a baked potato every night unhealthy?  Not necessarily -- it depends on how you weave it in to your eating plan for the day.  Could you eat more of other foods for perhaps more nutrients?  Yes.  But whether or not you need to do so depends on how you balance your eating.

What follows is a more detailed biochemical explanation. Warning:  LONG.  Bail out now if you want.  This is directed to folks like me with a high curiosity about the how and why of things.

A calorie is a measure of energy.  It doesn't matter the source of that energy; that much energy is that much energy.  So a calorie of table sugar is equal to a calorie of bread is equal to a calorie of potato is equal to a calorie of carrot is equal to a calorie of tomato.

What does differ, is the way the body processes that calorie.  Our bodies eat glucose.  No matter what we put in our stomachs, what goes into the blood stream is glucose.  Digestion is all about converting the food into glucose and anything else.  (Ok, there are vitamins and minerals and stuff, too, but let's keep this simple in terms of calories and energy.)  The "anything else" gets tossed out as waste.  The glucose goes into the blood stream.

Implication: the more convertible-to-glucose stuff in a calorie, the "denser" the calorie -- the more of it that actually gets used.  The more not-convertible stuff in a calorie, the less dense -- the more that is eliminated as waste.  The denser the food, the less of it you can eat compared to a less dense food for the same caloric load.

Once in the blood stream, that glucose has to get into appropriate cells.  There is a priority of which cells get first bite, so to speak.  Brain and liver are tops., since the brain is critical and the liver is the primary source of quick energy to the brain.  (That's why liver is such a dense food - it's chock full of calories.) Other organs come next.  Muscles come after that.  Anything left over is stored as fat.

The mechanism for all this is insulin.  Insulin serves two main purposes.  It facilitates the passage of glucose from the blood through the cell wall.  It is also the "storage" hormone -- insulin sweeps up all the remaining glucose (what hasn't been immediately used or stored locally in an organ or muscle)  in the blood and stores it in fat cells.

Glucose insensitivity is a condition where the cells do not respond to insulin, so the glucose does not get absorbed as well into the non-fat stores.  Diabetes is a condition in which the blood sugar level is so high as to be destructive.  Hence the relationship.

Implication: The more excess dense food, the more the danger of glucose insensitivity.

So, now let's get back to the table sugar, bread, potato, carrot and tomato. These are listed in the order of density.

Table sugar is but one step removed from glucose.  Little of it is wasted, most of it is converted, and converted quickly.  The glucose is released into the blood stream equally quickly as a big spike.  Insulin gets very busy, and then suddenly gets very not busy.  If your muscles et al do not need that burst of energy right now, most of it will go to fat.

Processed grains (starch) are two steps removed from glucose.  Whole grains have more fiber -- fiber is cannot by digested by humans.  All of it is eliminated as solid waste through the colon.  So they are less dense than processed grains.  A white potato is just under the processed flour in density.  A yam, or sweet potato, has more fiber. The carrot has not only more fiber, but more water.  It has a fair amount of sugar, but per volume, much less than the previously listed foods.  The tomato is almost entirely water, with a bit of fiber, and then a bunch of nutrients.

The non-starches (fruits and vegetables) are complex carbohydrates, while the processed flours and high-glucose root vegetables are less complex.  (i.e., not as much to break down in digestion.)  The complex carbohydrates take longer to digest, so your stomach remains full longer, and the release of glucose to the bloodstream happens gradually over a longer period of time; i.e., no spikes.  You get more energy for longer, thus giving the body more time to use the energy, and less chance of its getting stored as fat. Also, the longer it takes to digest food, the more calories used in the digestion itself.  (This is the science behind the fad diet of some foods having negative calories -- takes more calories to digest than is in the food itself.  Not sure there is really such a food, but I won't say there isn't.  The watery high-fiber vegies, like lettuce, come close, I suspect.)

The higher the glycemic index of a food (the closer it is to glucose), the more calories per measure of weight, and the fewer nutrients per weight.

Weight is, quite simply, a function of balancing calories in to calories out.  So, you can eat only candy, if you wish.  But if you want to do so without gaining weight, you have to eat very little.  That is not healthy, since all of your caloric load is taken up with low-nutrient foods.

This all comes down to that bottom line:  Is eating a baked potato every night unhealthy?  Not necessarily -- it depends on how you weave it in to your eating plan for the day.  Could you eat more of other foods for perhaps more nutrients?  Yes.  But whether or not you need to do so depends on how you balance it.

Caveat:  I am not a doctor.  If your doc disagrees with me, then follow your chosen expert's advice (or recognize that you need/want a different expert.)

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