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Grams per serving of veggies


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I've begun using the Canada Food Guide to learn to eat a balanced diet, especially eating more fruits and veggies. The guide calls for 7 servings a day for men over 50 like me. My problem is that they say a serving is 1/2 cup or 125 ml (1 cup if it's leafy greens).

Like many people here I weigh all my food and think that measuring veggies in cups is silly. How many grams in one of those servings? 100? It's hard to tell and Health Canada's website doesn't clear the problem up.

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I'm fairly sure 85g is a standard serving of fruits and vegetables.

That's why I like the logging tool on nurtimirror, you can weigh your food enter any measurement (cup, ounce, gram, etc.) and the tool will calculate it correctly for you.  I weigh everything as well, but I use ounces.

Good luck,

 

i think for most veggies it's 50g/serving.  i know that's what CC says for cucumber: 50g or 1/2 cup.

That's weird, pgeorgian: half a cup of water is 113 g.

I dunno but it bothers me because half a cup of veggies is not much... a whole cup of broccoli (85g) is only 25cal.. so is that two servings or one according to the food guide?

ah, hell with it, I love veggies, and they are good for you and most are very low in calories... I'll eat as much as I want!

but 85g does seem like the standard since it is the amount listed on the back of most packaged vegetables

Water fills in all the holes in the measuring cup.  Vegetables don't.  You'll always get less grams in a cup with a substance like chopped broccoli or shredded leaves than you will with water.  Volume isn't the same thing as weight.

 

Following the same tack, "How many grams is a serving of vegetables?" is not an answerable question because it's too generalized.  Servings of vegetables are given in cups rather than grams because each vegetable (or fruit) will have a different volume (volume=how much space it occupies, like a cup's worth) and you'll get a different weight (as in grams).  A cup of shredded lettuce, for instance, will weigh about 55 grams.  A cup of diced pineapple will weigh about 155 grams.  See?  It fills the same space (its volume), but shows a three-fold difference in weight.

 

So if you want to know the amount of grams in a serving (or a cup, or 1/2 a cup), you have to choose a specific food to ask about.

bipolypesca: but the amount of food depends on the mass, not the volume, and that's grams. Otherwise a cup of cooked spinach is equivalent to a cup of raw spinach, and that's just silly.

Original Post by flamel:

bipolypesca: but the amount of food depends on the mass, not the volume, and that's grams. Otherwise a cup of cooked spinach is equivalent to a cup of raw spinach, and that's just silly.

I guess the only way you'd know is what he said earlier: you have to choose a specific food.  You can't generalize everything with all veggies.

Original Post by flamel:

bipolypesca: but the amount of food depends on the mass, not the volume, and that's grams. Otherwise a cup of cooked spinach is equivalent to a cup of raw spinach, and that's just silly.

 

Yes, it depends on how much mass (amount of food) fills up the volume in question (a 'serving,' let's say 'a cup').  Cooked spinach vs. raw spinach is the same as water vs. broccoli or pineapple vs. lettuce.  They are two different things that will give you different grams (weight) filling the same volume (space)--filling that volume/space differently because their mass (which determines how much volume they're going to take up) is different.  You might remember p=m/v from high school science (weight = mass/volume).  It's the same principle here.

 

A cup of raw spinach will give you about 30 grams.  Cooked spinach will give you about 180 grams in that same cup.  However, note that a 'serving' of raw vegetables is classified as a full cup, while a 'serving' of cooked vegetables is classified as 1/2 cup.  The Nutrition Commission, too, agrees that you can get more cooked vegetables into a cup than you can raw.  Wink

#10  
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So it I break the Broccoli into pieces it will weigh the same as if a chopped the broccoli into small cubes? The point of using Grams over cups is one of accuracy.

The same vegetable will take up more or less volume depending on how it is cut or prepared: However a gram of broccoli is always a gram ( and therefore has the nutritional value of 1 gram) no matter how its prepared

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