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I dunno WHAT I was thinking. I was bored so I took the "recipe" off the side of the ground mustard spice bottle. It looked like it would be a yummy sauce or dip. It called for:

1/4 cup ground mustard
2 tbsp. water
2 tsp. honey

That's it. I thought it was gonna taste like a sweet honey mustard sauce, but instead it was extreemely spicy and bitter. After one dab to taste I spit it out in the sink and rushed to my pantry for the freeze-dried veggies to get the taste outa my mouth. lol Was I supposed to add anything else to it that was listed? I can't imagine anyone being able to use it like THAT.

Speaking of which, does anybody know of a delicious low calorie/non fat recipe for a thick, creamy and sweet honey mustard sauce? I've tried just adding honey to regular mustard, but it doesn't come out the same way that I like. I'm kinda looking for restaurant taste/texture... without the fat.

12 Replies (last)

I think it's the ground mustard that caused the bad taste.  Maybe try regular mustard?  I don't think that there is a lot of fat in mustard.  Most of the recipes I see online just call for prepared mustard and honey, so I really think you just have to find a mustard that you like.

Hope maybe I helped???  :)

All yellow mustards pretty much taste the same. I'm weird... I don't like the taste of regular mustard, or even dijon, but I loveee honey mustard. I know there is no fat in mustard, as it's basically just like mustard seed, vinegar and something else.. but I've seen some ingredients on the honey sauces that include egg and other ingredients that bring the fat content way up. Unfortunately, those are always the best tasting and creamiest! Frown

I like making honey mustard with a mix of spicy brown mustard and coarse dijon rather than plain yellow mustard.  I then mix it with honey and a bit of lemon juice (I think this is the secret!) until I get the consistency/flavor I'm looking for .  Generally, it ends up being 1/3 honey, 2/3 mustard - I like my honey mustard more spicy than sweet.  The mix of spicy brown & dijon mustard makes it taste pretty darn close to the one you get at restaurants.  Good luck!

edited to add: If you like your honey mustard a little more on the creamy side, have you thought of replacing the mayo in those recipes with something like fat free or low fat greek yogurt? 

#4  
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Restaurant honey mustard is mostly mayo - hence the fat, creamy taste and texture. Mixing any kind of mustard with honey won't get you close without something sweet and creamy.

I'd recommend adding your mustard/honey mixture to some lowfat yogurt or light mayo. You may still find that it's not sweet enough, or (especially if you use yogurt) is too sour, but it'll be closer than what you described earlier.

Also, at least in my opinion, there's nothing good about plain yellow mustard. I find it very sour and unpleasant, whereas the stone ground mustard has interesting flavor. That'd be my recommendation for a mustard to use for something like this.

Although it doesn't taste at all like typical honey mustard dressing, I make a vinaigrette that contains both ingredients that I absolutely love:

1 part coarse ground mustard

slightly less honey

enough poppy seeds to give it some texture

a little olive oil

a good sized dab of crushed garlic (but definitely less than the mustard or honey)

salt and pepper to taste

enough cider vinegar to make it a pourable consistency.

Sorry about the imprecise recipe - I never measure. Mix the mustard and honey together first, then add everything else and whisk with a fork to combine.

Thanks for the ideas, guys. I think I'll try it using some fat free mayo and see what turns out. I generally don't like my sauces spicy at all, I have low tolerance. I am in LOVE with Whole Foods' peanut sauce that they make in-store, cuz it's not spicy at all and it's very sweet. But when I buy the bottled kind it's always got too much "kick". MEHHH... one day I'll figure out how to make my own of that too. lmao

Gotcher peanut sauce here:

  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • shallot
  • 3-4 tbsp lime juice
  • red curry paste to taste (if not available, just use a small amount of red pepper flakes)
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp white miso (skip if you don't have it, but it's good)
  • 4 oz silken tofu (to thicken - you could probably also use plain yogurt)

Put everything in the blender, add water for consistency, and enjoy.  Cut down on the coconut milk if you want to make it less fatty.

I make honey mustard like this:

1.5 tbsp fat free mayo

1 tbsp dijon mustard

1.5 tsp honey

Its low-cal and sooo good.  I love to bake chicken fingers and dip them- yummo :)

Using dijon mustard is the key. I take 1 tbsp of dijon and start with about 1/2 tsp of amber-coloured honey, then I whisk it together. If it's not sweet enough, I add more honey, a few drops at a time, until it tastes right.

Try this with pure maple syrup too... it's good!

#9  
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Original Post by lysistrata:

Gotcher peanut sauce here:

  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • shallot
  • 3-4 tbsp lime juice
  • red curry paste to taste (if not available, just use a small amount of red pepper flakes)
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 3 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp white miso (skip if you don't have it, but it's good)
  • 4 oz silken tofu (to thicken - you could probably also use plain yogurt)

Put everything in the blender, add water for consistency, and enjoy.  Cut down on the coconut milk if you want to make it less fatty.

I make a similar sauce (although I love spicy foods, so I add lots of curry paste!). But it'll taste more like satay sauce that you get at Thai restaurants if you use peanuts instead of peanut butter, and fish sauce instead of soy sauce. I've never added miso, and I also don't add the tofu.

OOO Thanks for the sauce recipes! I might have to omit the curry powder though. lol Think regular skim or evaporated milk would work in place of coconut?

Original Post by ezzied:

OOO Thanks for the sauce recipes! I might have to omit the curry powder though. lol Think regular skim or evaporated milk would work in place of coconut?

 Skim milk wouldn't work. It would thin out the sauce too much and you wouldn't get the right flavour. Coconut milk adds a lot to a peanut sauce. Evaporated milk might not interfere with the texture too much but again, the flavour won't be as good. You can buy small cans of light coconut milk.

#12  
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Original Post by ezzied:

OOO Thanks for the sauce recipes! I might have to omit the curry powder though.

Note that curry powder is very different from curry paste. Curry powder is made from dry spices, typically cumin, turmeric, fenugreek and others. It's typically an Indian spice. Curry paste, on the other hand, is a Thai ingredient. It has ground fresh garlic, onions, chilis and lemongrass (among other things), is definitely pasty, not dry, and tastes very different from Indian curry. They're both really good, but most peanut sauces I know of are based on/similar to satay sauce, which is more Thai than Indian.

On the other hand, curry paste is usually spicy, but curry powder doesn't tend to be (although if you're very sensitive, I'd check first). Who knows, maybe curry powder would be a tasty, if different, substitute!

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