Foods
Moderators: chrissy1988, sun123


Move Over Butter


Quote  |  Reply

Today I baked a mango cake in which I added two cups of finely diced fresh mangos to the following, with substitutions: whole wheat flour for white; maple syrup for granulated sugar; 1 cup of Move Over Butter (600 calories) for 1 cup of butter (1628)  or 12 tbs. of olive oil (1440); 2 teaspoons baking powder for 1 and 1/2 teaspoons of baking soda; 1 teapoon of vanilla extract; and 3 whole eggs.

Despite what it looked like as I mixed the MOB with the maple syrup and eggs before adding to the dry mixture, the cake turned out marvelous.  I have been using MOB for several things, but had not realized that it can work quite well in baking, too.

Here are the basics for Move Over Butter:

One tablespoon has:

  • 1g. of saturated fat
  • 0g. of trans fat
  • 3g. of poly. fat
  • 1.5g. of mono.fat
  • 0% cholesterol
  • 75mg. sodium
  • 50 calories

It is a 65% vegetable spread.

I am wondering if any of you have tried MOB and if you have tried vegetable spreads that you like better than using butter, for whatever reasons.

20 Replies (last)

Hey shane,

I checked a site that listed the MOB serving size as One tablespoon and 50 calories, so you might want to recheck on that.

I've used Smart Balance as a spread for a couple of years and like the taste more than butter (on a slice of fresh baked bread from the oven for instance). It has a pretty good fat profile, with lots of Omega 3's. I haven't cooked with it much though.

 

 

Original Post by oldguysrule:

Hey shane,

I checked a site that listed the MOB serving size as One tablespoon and 50 calories, so you might want to recheck on that.

I've used Smart Balance as a spread for a couple of years and like the taste more than butter (on a slice of fresh baked bread from the oven for instance). It has a pretty good fat profile, with lots of Omega 3's. I haven't cooked with it much though.

Thanks!  I will Edit-in the correction.  I should have caught that.  My evoo is 120 per tablespoon and butter is 102 per tablespoon.  So I am still ahead of the game with MOB at 50 per tablespoon.

I agree with you about Smart Balance.  I like their spread and their peanut butter.

Move Over Butter Ingredients:Liquid Soybean Oil, Water, Sweet Cream Buttermilk, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Vegetable Mono- and Diglycerides and Soy Lecithin (Emulsifiers), Potassium Sorbate and Sodium Benzoate (to Preserve Freshness), Hydrogenated Colored With Beta Caroten ...

 

Butter Ingredients: Cream

 

Sorry regardless of calories I'll take real butter over refined soybean oil any day. Hopefully you know what partially hydrogenated soybean oil is.

 


Yes, I did some research on it.  I also did some research on what some doctors have said about butter and diet. It would seem to me that you are correct in suggesting that hydrogenated soybean oil is not something one wants to consume a lot of.  However, your simplistic listing of butter as "cream" leaves a bit out about certain drawbacks to it. Butter contains high levels of saturated fat (which I agree not everybody is agreement about the dangers of) and high levels of cholesterol (which for some people is definitely not good). 

An interesting sidelight that I came across is that a person who eats butter should eat butter made from milk from cattle who are grass fed. (Which is what I think we should do concerning bison, beef, and elk.)

I believe that you are correct that a bit of butter would be better than eating most margarine type spreads.  What I found most of all is that neither is really recommended by many health experts and doctors.

I shall have to figure out what I want to put in my baking in place of butter or vegetable spread:  I suppose I will go back to using olive oil at times.  Thanks.

It seems like the way that they make all these lower-fat spreads is to add water to the butter.   All of them have water as the 2nd ingredient it seems.... Maybe if you have some spare time and are overly worried about soybeans, you could try the same recipe and use 50 percent butter, 25 percent apple sauce, and 25 percent water cupwise.

Since we are trying to lose weight, baking cakes or cookies isn't something we do much, right?  On the rare instances that I bake I  always use real unsweatened butter.  There is nothing better for baking.   For daily use I like MOB or Smart Balance. I don't use much of either. 

No problem shane, I'm glad I could shed some light. I'm also in the camp that believes natural saturated fat is perfectly fine when consumed in a balanced natural and unprocessed diet. Cholesterol again, is perfectly fine to consume. Most if not all of the negative health information for both saturated fat and cholesterol are based on a theory that started almost 50 years ago that says LDL cholesterol was the cause of heart disease and because saturated fat increased LDL that it too, must be elimanated........nobody has been able to prove any such thing, nobody........ on the contrary the foods that we've been told to replace saturated fat and cholesterol with like "Move Over Butter" are one of the main contributors to heart disease. Unfortunately it takes a lot of investigation to find this out. I'm from Canada and we don't have a daily restriction on cholesterol as do a lot of other countries, you might start there and ask yourself why.

thhq
Jan 31 2010 20:32
Member posts
Send message
#8  
Quote  |  Reply

Whichever fat you choose, portion size is far more important than source.  All of them are healthy in moderation.  Butter, lard, olive, canola, soy, fish, linseed (flax), etc.  

Like neanderthin, I'm still looking for the controlled clinical study that proves that monounsaturated fats lower LDL. Until I find it the only thing I can rely on is

Heart Healthy = Count the Calories 

"the foods that we've been told to replace saturated fat and cholesterol with like "Move Over Butter" are one of the main contributors to heart disease. Unfortunately it takes a lot of investigation to find this out. I'm from Canada and we don't have a daily restriction on cholesterol as do a lot of other countries, you might start there and ask yourself why"

Good information, everyone.  Thanks.

Original Post by thhq:
Like neanderthin, I'm still looking for the controlled clinical study that proves that monounsaturated fats lower LDL. Until I find it the only thing I can rely on is

 

Fill me in. Are you saying that mono fats don't lower LDL and further, that unsaturated fats don't lower LDL.............this is pretty contrary to the research I've done. Of course this doesn't mean I go along with the theory that lowering LDL does anything to prevent arterial plaque.......that is relegated to the size of the LDL.

Hey Shane I recently tried a new butter substitute from Whole Foods that actually has virgin coconut oil in it. Studies have shown that virgin coconut oil can increase energy levels, as well as your metabolism. You will have to try it and let me know what you think. It is called Melt, and is only available in select health food stores. I have tried both baking and putting it on vegetables, and everything has turned out delicious. It's also 70% organic, 100% kosher... so I actually feel good about eating it!

alexisghoyt:  Thanks.  I shall look for it, probably at a mall.  We don't have any Whole Foods anywhere remotely close to us.  Nor do we have a Trader Joe's anywhere close.  I have written it down and will do some search and research.  Thanks, again.

Original Post by alexisghoyt:

Hey Shane I recently tried a new butter substitute from Whole Foods that actually has virgin coconut oil in it. Studies have shown that virgin coconut oil can increase energy levels, as well as your metabolism. You will have to try it and let me know what you think. It is called Melt, and is only available in select health food stores. I have tried both baking and putting it on vegetables, and everything has turned out delicious. It's also 70% organic, 100% kosher... so I actually feel good about eating it!

Any oil can increase energy levels, as fats are high in energy....

thhq
Feb 05 2010 02:43
Member posts
Send message
#14  
Quote  |  Reply

neanderthin, sorry if I was presumptuous.  It sounds like you've found studies that link lower LDL with consumption of monounsaturated fat, but I've never seen one and I'd appreciate a reference.  I'm looking for the size of the effect expected from the fat substitution only. In my own casual attempts to control high LDL I've seen that statins work the best for me, and they have lowered my LDL by about 40 mg/dL.  I've seen no benefit from raising dietary fiber consumption. [But that was while taking statins, and maybe there isn't an additive effect.] I also tried a reduced fat diet for several months and saw very little effect on my LDL.  Over a period of 15 years I've come to the conclusion that I have high LDL no matter what, how much, or how little I eat, or what I weigh.  I've found it possible to double my HDL with exercise, but have not found an effective non-drug method to hold my LDL at or near 100 mg/dL.

 

Original Post by thhq:

neanderthin, sorry if I was presumptuous.  It sounds like you've found studies that link lower LDL with consumption of monounsaturated fat, but I've never seen one and I'd appreciate a reference.  I'm looking for the size of the effect expected from the fat substitution only. In my own casual attempts to control high LDL I've seen that statins work the best for me, and they have lowered my LDL by about 40 mg/dL.  I've seen no benefit from raising dietary fiber consumption. [But that was while taking statins, and maybe there isn't an additive effect.] I also tried a reduced fat diet for several months and saw very little effect on my LDL.  Over a period of 15 years I've come to the conclusion that I have high LDL no matter what, how much, or how little I eat, or what I weigh.  I've found it possible to double my HDL with exercise, but have not found an effective non-drug method to hold my LDL at or near 100 mg/dL.

 

You may find this useful:

http://www.metabolism.com/2008/08/22/heart-ma tter/

thhq
Feb 05 2010 11:56
Member posts
Send message
#16  
Quote  |  Reply

Thanks, oldguys. All of these sound like well controlled studies focused on the effects of fat type on LDL.  Unfortunately there are no specifics in the linked summary on the LDL reduction effect (only that it is statistically significant), nor any comparison with control of LDL using statins.  I'll have to find the reports, but at least I know where to look now.  

thhq
Feb 05 2010 21:48
Member posts
Send message
#17  
Quote  |  Reply

Bear with me all one more time....I'm writing this mostly for my own benefit...

I dug out the 1992 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition study on the effect of dietary fat on a small population of adult women.  The months-long study was carefully controlled to hold calories and % dietary fat nearly constant.  Comparison was made to a base diet.  Here are the LDL results from Table 3 (expressed as mmol/L), as well as saturated fat (as % of total diet calories) in each of the proscribed diets:

Dietary fat             Base   ;   Saturated   Monounsaturated   Polyunsaturated

LDL mmol/L______2.9______3.4__________2.8________ ____2.9

% Sat Fat_______14______18___________10____________ _10

The study concludes that there is a statistical difference between all-saturated and all-unsaturated diets on LDL.  Best to worst case in this study is 100 x (1-(2.8/3.4)) = 18% reduction in LDL.  If I convert this to the more familiar mg/dL units at a 140 base, that's a potential 25 mg/dL reduction.  This looks good, and approaches the effect of statin drugs. 

Unfortunately, that's only the effect you would expect in going from the all- saturated to the all-unsaturated  diet.  When comparing all-unsaturated to the women's base diet of mixed fats the difference is insignificant.  Based on this I would expect that a shift to an all monounsaturated fat diet would not have any measurable effect on my LDL, and I'll continue to use statins to keep LDL under 100.

And I'll continue to use real butter on my toast without obsessing over what it does to my LDL.  

thhq I think maybe you should do some research on the subpatterns of cholesterol including LDL, hopefully this will give you some additional depth of knowledge that is quite enlightening and required, especially given your concerns.

thhq
Feb 06 2010 11:39
Member posts
Send message
#19  
Quote  |  Reply

Thanks, neanderthin.  These studies interest me because I've worked as a research scientist for many years.  This isn't my field, but studies like these are similar to academia papers I deal with.  It's a lot easier to build up a decent-sized population to study when the objects are inanimate and individual experiments are simple and cheap.  I would pick at the AJCN study for having such a small population (the number of scientists cited in the paper is close to 1/4 the size of the population studied, a bad sign).  Because the group is so small, and splits about 50/50 pre and post menopausal (which in itself has a large effect on LDL), the standard deviations on the LDL's are very large.  

This objection aside, it's refreshing to read what appear to be indicators of a trend. Even if this is not done with even the precision of a GI test or a BMR model, it's better than listening to the pontifications of the latest Dr. Feelgood hawking his dietary supplement, or Farmer John trying to get me to eat his grass fed steer, or the olive oil industry slapping a red heart on their high calorie product. 

If I had to do it over again, nutrition looks like a more interesting and vital field of study than what I do for a living.  I'm not sure that digging into more of the literature would improve my personal, population of one, health.  The semicontrolled experiments I've run on myself take a long time to finish, and this study doesn't lead me to running any new ones.  I have one useful takeaway. I do not expect that eliminating saturated fat (ie butter and cheese) from my mixed fat, controlled calorie diet will measurably lower my LDL.    

I found Bestlife "buttery spread" with 0% hydrogenated oils or cholesterol in it.  I know, there may be something else bad in it, though.  60 calories per tablespoon. Also, contains extra virgin olive oil.

20 Replies
Advertisement
Advertisement