Foods
Moderators: chrissy1988, sun123


I'm not an oatmeal person but we started eating it this week to increase my husband's good cholesterol number. It's not bad at all, I just don't know what else I can do with it other than heat it up with milk in the microwave.

I've seen several types on the grocery shelf and I'd like to know what you would rather eat - steel cut or rolled. In terms of nutrition and taste, which one is better? Also how do you prepare yours?

Thanks in advance.

14 Replies (last)

Steel cut taste a lot better to me. It's really about the texture.

I cook them on the stove, then add cinnamon and a little brown sugar. Delic.

Mix in some dried fruit (careful...too much is deadly) and sprinkle with cinnamon.  I sometimes mix in some chia seeds.

Well, there's a million ideas on how to prepare oats over here.

 I don't really eat oats anymore because they don't fill me up for long, no matter what I add to them but I used to cook them in water or unsweetened almond milk. I prefer rolled oats because I get to eat a larger portion (when cooked), they cook faster than steel cut and I like the mushiness of rolled vs. steel cut.

I prefer rolled oats simply because I have yet to try steel cut oats.

I usually soak them in water/milk/almond milk overnight then heat them up in the microwave the next morning. I then add some canned pumpkin, cinnamon and maple syrup.

I use quick oats and very occaisonally steel cut oats but I like the quick oats because I put them in the mircowave (2:20 minutes for a 1/3 cup serving) with water and 1/4 cup serving of mixed berries..the berries melt down a bit and it's a delicious natural sugar so it sweetens the oats then i top with cinnamon.

brackish_kitty:

I tried eating rolled oats years ago, but they were just too "globby" and "gummy" for my tastes.

Then one of my daughters sent me some steel-cut oats, and I absolutely "fell in love" with them (OK, "absolutely" is a bit strong LOL!). 

I loath the texture of cooked rolled oats, but the texture of steel-cut oats I find to be great.  I under cook mine a bit and simply add 1 tablespoon of maple syrup and 1/4th cup of skim milk to my cooked oats (1/2 cup uncooked in 2 cups of water).

My cooking time for steel-cut oats is around 12 minutes.

  • I bring 2 cups of water to boiling
  • Add 1/2 cup of uncooked steel cut oats
  • reduce the heat to medium
  • let cook for around 11-13 minutes
  • stir often enough to not let them stick to the bottom of the pan

I buy John McCann's Irish Oatmeal (steel-cut oats), but there are several good brands out there.

 

I prefer rolled oats.  I tried steel cut, but there was something about the texture that I didn't like.  They also take longer to cook, and since I usually cook mine in the microwave, I have to constantly monitor it.  My favorite way to eat oats is to mix in frozen berries (current favorite is blueberries) and fat-free vanilla yogurt.  Kind of looks a little funny, but it is soooo good!  Sometimes I'll do a combination like strawberry and banana.  It's a delicious breakfast that never fails to keep me full till lunch!

I love steel-cut oats. I was introduced to them last year by my best friend. I will usually cook a cup of oats to 4 cups water (the package says 3 cups, but 4 makes the calories stretch a bit more) on the stove until done, eat one serving, then put the rest in the fridge.  Steel-cut oats can be reheated with no problem.  

I like mine with 1 tsp of maple syurp, a few bits of pecans, a pinch of salt, splenda and almond milk.  

You do have to stir them a few times while cooking, and it does take 20 minutes, but it's worth it if you make a few batches at a time.

Neither. 

There are better ways to increase HDL and lower LDL

Thanks!

Original Post by carmenxox:

Neither. 

There are better ways to increase HDL and lower LDL

Such as...?

If you're not going to answer the question the OP was posing then perhaps you should actually contribute something useful.

steel cut! I like the texture
Original Post by bierorama:

Original Post by carmenxox:

Neither. 

There are better ways to increase HDL and lower LDL

Such as...?

If you're not going to answer the question the OP was posing then perhaps you should actually contribute something useful.

LDL (bad) cholesterol builds up in the arteries in response to inflammation. This is triggered by a diet high in trans fat and processed carbohydrates, NOT saturated fat or dietary cholesterol. 

Cutting grains (especially processed kinds), and sugar (including fruit juice) will do wonders for decreasing LDL. 

Eating MORE fish, flax, and eggs will improve HDL cholesterol levels while aiding the decrease in LDL cholesterol-- granted that you are monitoring processed food intake, especially from grains, sugars, and hydrogenated oils. Omega 3 containing foods reduce the amount of inflammation in the arteries, and thereby decreasing the amount of bad cholesterol in the blood. 

The reason oatmeal "works" to reduce cholesterol is because soluble fiber goes into the blood stream and helps to "sweep" cholesterol away. But any type of soluble fiber will have this effect, oatmeal is only special because of clever marketing from Quaker and Cheerios.. etc. that tell you that oat-fiber is the cure all to your cholesterol problems. What they fail to tell you is that this "special" fiber is available in other foods besides oats-- for example: apples, pears, flax seed, carrots, nut, and berries-- all which have more nutritional value than oatmeal and taste better too. 

 

 

Original Post by carmenxox:

Original Post by bierorama:

Original Post by carmenxox:

Neither. 

There are better ways to increase HDL and lower LDL

Such as...?

If you're not going to answer the question the OP was posing then perhaps you should actually contribute something useful.

LDL (bad) cholesterol builds up in the arteries in response to inflammation. This is triggered by a diet high in trans fat and processed carbohydrates, NOT saturated fat or dietary cholesterol. 

Cutting grains (especially processed kinds), and sugar (including fruit juice) will do wonders for decreasing LDL. 

Eating MORE fish, flax, and eggs will improve HDL cholesterol levels while aiding the decrease in LDL cholesterol-- granted that you are monitoring processed food intake, especially from grains, sugars, and hydrogenated oils. Omega 3 containing foods reduce the amount of inflammation in the arteries, and thereby decreasing the amount of bad cholesterol in the blood. 

The reason oatmeal "works" to reduce cholesterol is because soluble fiber goes into the blood stream and helps to "sweep" cholesterol away. But any type of soluble fiber will have this effect, oatmeal is only special because of clever marketing from Quaker and Cheerios.. etc. that tell you that oat-fiber is the cure all to your cholesterol problems. What they fail to tell you is that this "special" fiber is available in other foods besides oats-- for example: apples, pears, flax seed, carrots, nut, and berries-- all which have more nutritional value than oatmeal and taste better too. 

 

 

I appreciate your response. He already eats everything else that you mentioned. Also his LDL number is good based on the lab work 2 weeks ago. Our goal is to increase his HDL since it's quite low at the moment and we're aiming for 40, according to his doctor.

If you have a husband who's father died of pancreatitis at 50, 2 brothers suffering from pancreatitis themselves and him so close to having one due to genetics, you will do everything within your power - continuous research and numerous visits to specialists, to prolong his life and better his health condition so he does not end up like the rest of the family.

All I asked are people's opinion of which kind of oats they prefer to eat as this is not normally a part of our diet. We did not choose to eat oats because of these advertisements; we are doing this to have varieties in our meals.

14 Replies
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