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Ramen Noodles


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Quick Question:

I am thinking of eating ramen noodles more for dinner.  I don't have money to spend on healthy food, and the noodles are super cheap and 400 calories.  I usually have 400-500 calories saved for dinner so it seems to work out in my mind.... but it is starchy white noodles that are probably crap for my system...

Will eating ramen negatively affect my weight loss goal as long as I stay within my caloric needs?  Or can someone at least tell me what I want to hear?  :) jk 
18 Replies (last)
When I make ramen, I try to mix it with something healthy.  Like the other day I put some frozen broccoli in it.  I've also mixed in chicken and tuna.

That way you're at least getting some protein.
High in fat, saturated fat, sodium. Next to zero fiber. The carbs so processed it must flood your blood stream with sugars faster then, well, sugar.

Whats not to like? At least they have removed the trans fats out of most of them.

They will never be good for you but if you can really only spend $.50 a day on food and you only eat your intake and exercise you will lose weight.
What about a nice bag of brown rice?  Takes a little longer to cook, but at least some good fiber there.  8-) 
You could stretch them with lots of veggies and use low sodium chicken broth instead of the seasoning packet.

If you're on a budget, try this website

http://www.healthy.hillbillyhousewife.com/die tingonabudget.htm

It's a very practical approach
The noodles are bad enough alone, but then you add the heart attack by mixing in the packet. If I were you, I'd splurge on a bag of whole grain pasta (5lbs = $3 @ Sam's Club -- if you don't have a membership, find someone who does), and some low sodium, low fat broth. Way healthier, and just as cheap.

But, if you haven't noticed (which is tough around here) weigh loss is calories in and calories out, no matter how you get those calories. Not healthy, but if you take in less than you burn, you lose weight.
BTW the "proper" way to eat ramen is to cock and strain the noodles and add the packet to the damp noodles (thus making sure you get every milligram of sodium).
#7  
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Brown rice really is a great idea. I saw a 10lb "dog food" bag for only $3. Really good for you too. Cooking it in chicken/vegtable broth (you can use the cubes) really gives it good flavor, and you can also add tumeric. It also has fewer calories. With the leftovers, you can make rice pudding. Yum!
When I used to eat ramen al lot, I always threw out the seasoning packet (too much crap in there!) Instead

  • Invest in a bottle of Sesame Oil
  • Drain almost all the water before eating the noodles
  • Chop up some green onions, carrots, or maybe even a scrambled egg and add at the very end.
It CAN be healthy!
As a starving college student I eat ramen quite frequently. The sodium is insane but alot of that it the broth. I usually drain the broth before I eat the noodles. Putting some veggies in the noodles is a pretty good idea. I dont think ramen is good for you but sometimes you cant afford anything else. Just make sure you get fruits and veggies and protein through out the rest of the day and I dont think it's going hurt you too much.
Ramen noodles aren't dried before they're packaged; they're fried, hence the high fat/saturated fat content. If you rinse off the noodles after you cook them, it's supposed to help get rid of a lot of the fat.

Or try dried thai food noodles. They don't taste as good, but they also don't take up your entire saturated fat allowance for the day.
When I read the title of the post, I thought this is about the REAL Ramen Noodles .... not the crap package ones (that I also like btw lol - thats my comfort food!).

Anyway, if you do eat the package goods, add vegies to it (fresh or frozen) and replace the water you boiled it with with clean hot water. You wont get as much of the 'stuff' that got excreeted during the boiling process, and use less water & half of the seasoning first :) Enjoy!
Tip for storing whole grains and whole grain products - If you buy them in bulk, they may turn rancid before you can use them up.  Whole grains contain traces of healthy oils and fats, and that's what goes bad and produces the rancid smell. 

Make sure they are fresh when you buy them.  Store them in the refrigerator or freezer for longer shelf life. 
Tip for storing whole grains and whole grain products - If you buy them in bulk, they may turn rancid before you can use them up.  Whole grains contain traces of healthy oils and fats, and that's what goes bad and produces the rancid smell. 
Make sure they are fresh when you buy them.  Store them in the refrigerator or freezer for longer shelf life. 


??

That applies to Instant Noodles? o.0? Or is it a miss-post, claire?
Just an aside here, Momofuku Ando dies this week , he was the inventor of Ramen (instant noodles). Just a bit of irony "Ando gave a speech at the company's New Year ceremony and enjoyed Chicken Ramen for lunch with Nissin employees on Thursday before falling ill".

I have to say at least 10 of the pounds I lost have been Ramen. I have been eating them since the mid 70's. God I love 'em. In fact I miss them.
In case you weren't aware, the prepackaged cheapo ramen noodles are deep fried noodles. Even with out the packet o'sodium they are extremely high in fat and refinded carbs, with out a vitamin in site.

You are much better off with real pasta, but if you insist, use very little if any of the seasoning packet, drink lots of water and supplement it with a buch of fresh fruit and veggies.

I ama single mother with very little money, trust me there are many better options. Make up a large pot of sauce and whole grain or parttially whole grain pasta or rice, you can live off the left overs for days.

bagged salads are also great.

make large batches of soups or other healthy entrees and freeze tfhem in individual zipper bags or tupperware.

there are many great low cost options that are much healthier.
I use soba noodles all the time.  They are made from whole buckwheat and cook fast.  They end up being just as cheap as ramen if you use 2 ounces per serving, which is plenty.  I get mine at an Asian grocery store, but I've seen them in the supermarket and health food stores too.  The Asian market is cheaper.
#17  
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They're deep fried? Eew. I know they are loaded with MSG, too much of that isn't very good for you and can cause headaches.
#18  
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Does anybody  know how many calories you can save by draining the water?  I know it has to be significant... have you ever seen that stuff congeal?  ew.

Liz
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