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recipe analyzer


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Hi

I was wondering what your guys do with the recipe analyzer, i've noticed that it calculates the ingrediants gives a final weight/ calorie content and splits it bettween the number of portions.

Now this works fine for some recipes where the ingredients you add are pre-cooked or recipes where there isn't a great deal of cooking.

But in most recipes you lose alot of water and the food reduces so the final product weighs much much less than the ingredients used to make it.

BlaH!! am i even making sence??

for example ... today ive made a beef moussaka

According to the analzer i have 1700g of food, but i don't ... 1700g's worth of ingredients went into my pot but now im guessing there is about 1000g of finnished food because of the water loss during preperation.

i always split a finnish meal by as many servings as i need to to result in a gram weight that is easily managable... for example 17 servings in this case 100g, with each serving having 98 calories

This way i can add 2 servings to my food log and use my scales to weigh out 200g on to my plate ....

 the problem is i know for a fact there is not 17servings worth in that bowl and i know there is now caloreis in 1 serving than the 98 calories the recipe analyzer proclaims and i think this is causing me some major issues as im eating more calories than the calculator is figureing and im not sure how to make it more accurate without wieghing the finnished food and that just gets messy and my scales can't handle it

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I always just set the portions so that one portion is the smallest amount I would eat. For something like mousakka, I would make the number of portions equal to the number of slices in the entire dish. Then you can just add one portion for each slice you eat.

I know that it would be more accurate to be able to weigh out portions, but I don't think there is any way the recipe analyzer could do that kind of calculation (accounting for water loss or gain, etc), so this is the best option.

Good luck!

It doesn't make any difference. Water doesn't have any calories so it doesn't affect the portion information. 1/8 of the uncooked recipe will have exactly the same number of calories as 1/8 of the cooked one.

One way to do it is to figure the volume of your finished recipe in cups... if I'm making soup, I'll make the soup up, then ladle it out into a bowl by the cup and just count how many it takes, then one cup is a serve. Easy to calculate, easy to dish up, and not too much to eat at a time... or if you're making something that will be assembled in a baking dish, assume that one portion is a certain percentage of the dish (say, 1/8 of the pan) and the recipe has that many portions.

Leiela- I was planning to make dinner, and some of the ingredients in it weren't in the Foods list so I was debating whether or not to make it. Well I made it after posting and asking for help because I was sure someone on here had encountered that at least once before. I wasn't quite sure how to use the recipe analyzer either, but I went to it and it gave instructions on how to enter all of your ingredients, and if they weren't entered right you could go back and change them. What I did was this: (i made stir fry steak) I know anytime I usually make this, how many meals we get out of it, so I just estimated! And I imagined smaller portions than I would normally eat. If you're off a few calories I don't think it'll make much of a difference one time. (am I right anyone?) LOL well I'll take my chances.

Sometimes you can just mentally divide it up and guess how many portions your going to get out of it, and for thinkings that can be visably split its not too hard.

However i find it really hard with things like soup, stew or sauces ... i have a massive pan i use to make soups and went i have a soup in it its almost impossible to work out how many servings are in it by eye ... not only that i can dish out a portion and weigh that but there could be 10 or 12 portions left who knows ...

tbh the pan is really deciving and because it doens't visably split it's hard to know what percentage of it you took out ... the water level go's down as it where but that not a great deal of help to work out how much is left and i can't realistically sit there scooping it all out while it go's cold to wiegh it all, besides other than this one big pan i don't think i have anything big enough to hold it all.

Original Post by leiela:

Sometimes you can just mentally divide it up and guess how many portions your going to get out of it, and for thinkings that can be visably split its not too hard.

However i find it really hard with things like soup, stew or sauces ... i have a massive pan i use to make soups and went i have a soup in it its almost impossible to work out how many servings are in it by eye ... not only that i can dish out a portion and weigh that but there could be 10 or 12 portions left who knows ...

tbh the pan is really deciving and because it doens't visably split it's hard to know what percentage of it you took out ... the water level go's down as it where but that not a great deal of help to work out how much is left and i can't realistically sit there scooping it all out while it go's cold to wiegh it all, besides other than this one big pan i don't think i have anything big enough to hold it all.

With a large pot like that, one day fill it with water, cup by cup, until it gets to the top of where you would fill it for cooking. Count as you go. Then you will know approximately how many servings (ie. cups) are in your large pot. Then all you need to do is determine, do you eat 1 cup, 1 1/2 cups, etc. as a serving.

For example: if it holds 20 cups of water, it will also hold 20 cups of stew or soup. When you use the recipe analyzer, put "20" in as the number of servings if you generally eat 1 cup size. If you eat 2 cups worth, put in "10" as the number of servings.

Original Post by justamom:

Original Post by leiela:

Sometimes you can just mentally divide it up and guess how many portions your going to get out of it, and for thinkings that can be visably split its not too hard.

However i find it really hard with things like soup, stew or sauces ... i have a massive pan i use to make soups and went i have a soup in it its almost impossible to work out how many servings are in it by eye ... not only that i can dish out a portion and weigh that but there could be 10 or 12 portions left who knows ...

tbh the pan is really deciving and because it doens't visably split it's hard to know what percentage of it you took out ... the water level go's down as it where but that not a great deal of help to work out how much is left and i can't realistically sit there scooping it all out while it go's cold to wiegh it all, besides other than this one big pan i don't think i have anything big enough to hold it all.

With a large pot like that, one day fill it with water, cup by cup, until it gets to the top of where you would fill it for cooking. Count as you go. Then you will know approximately how many servings (ie. cups) are in your large pot. Then all you need to do is determine, do you eat 1 cup, 1 1/2 cups, etc. as a serving.

For example: if it holds 20 cups of water, it will also hold 20 cups of stew or soup. When you use the recipe analyzer, put "20" in as the number of servings if you generally eat 1 cup size. If you eat 2 cups worth, put in "10" as the number of servings.

 Thanks thats a really good idea how do you measure where to fill it too though?? some days i might fill it half other days just a quarter and some days it's full right to the top.

Not to be mean or anything, but you seem to be making more problems for yourself. If you're eating soup and making it yourself, most likely it's pretty healthy.

All the suggestions here are excellent. I usually do the measuring out thing with the soup so I know how many serves there are. Then I'll go back and edit the original recipe servings so that it's compatible with the portion I'm eating. For example I come out with 8 cups of soup. I make the serving size 2 cups and edit the recipe down to 4 serves. If I only eat 1 cup of soup, I'll edit it up to 8 again before I add it to the food log.

Also I add in water as a recipe ingredient. Things do cook down and reduce but it makes everything a bit more accurate with the weight. The recipe analyzer isn't perfect, but it's a good way to be accountable. Don't stress too much about not having "exact" calorie amounts :)

I totally agree with figurethefat's post above. If you are watching the ingredients you are using, you are probably making a healthy meal, and if your serving sizes are a little different from one batch to the next, it really won't matter all that much.

As far as your question about where to fill it to - once you know what the pot holds, then a serving is a serving is a serving. For example: If you make 10 servings of soup which fills the pot about 1/2 full (just guessing) at 150 calories per cup, and the next day you double the recipe to make 20 servings, which fills the pot to the brim, each serving is still only 150 calories. Does that make sense? You are not measuring how many calories are in the pot, you are measuring how many calories are in a serving.

Hope that helps. take care - and don't stress over it too much.

I know i can be pretty obbsessive about these things and i also know you are probabally right i try and make healthy food but when some things when being half a cup out either way can make a big difference to the amount of calories to add to your log i do feel the need to be as exact as possible about it.

I've spent pretty much my entire life under eating and now im making an effort to get in shape im very aware i need to fix my metabalism which involved eating more, but at the same time my goal is to lose fat/weight.

I have this horrid tendancy to over estimate the food i eat .. if im not sure i tend to double what i think it is becase thats better in my (irrational) eye's than underestimating and heaven forbid putting some weight on by accident.

This is were my logical side comes to the rescue, although the scales i wiegh myself are my worst enemy the scales i weigh my food on are my best friend ... i can't overestimate/ubnderestimate and i can sit down and enjoy a meal i've wieghed without the worry and stress of wondering if i measured it right.

Unforunatly i have a very obbsessive personality type and as much is i know its irrational i can't seem to enjoy a meal which i'm not 100% sure of the calorie content which is why i haven't enjoyed a meal cooked by anyone but me since i started dieting .. which of course my husband loves because i won't let him cook anymore.

i just hate HATE!!! not knowing whats in it ... i can cope with eating a meal with 2000cals as long as i know its got 2000cals ... i can't deal with eating an unknown meal that probabally has 300 calories just incase it has 320.  

Hey I have a solution to this as it was bothering me too. Sorry to revive an old thread if there is a newer one with the solution.

1. Enter your recipe with all ingredients including water.

2. The recipe will give you the final weight as if no water evaporated.

3. Weight the final cooked product.

4. Determine the "evap factor". For example raw weight 1000g, cooked weight 800g, 1000/800 is 1.25

5. When you serve your food, weight it, but when you enter the weight into CC, multiply it by the "evap factor" ie 300g serving x 1.25 = 375g of raw products.

Hope this helps. I think it would be good if the recipe maker let you enter a final cooked weight and did this automatically!!

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