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rinsing off sodium from canned veggies


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Does anyone know if rinsing off canned veggies gets much of the sodium off or has it soaked into the product?

I liked canned beans for '3 bean salad', for the convenience, but am trying to get away from sodium.

thanks
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 Yes, by rinsing off canned vegetables you can get rid of 40% of the sodium. 

From what I've seen online, caitling is correct.

If canned vegetables are used, rinse them under running water for two to three minutes prior to cooking. Rinsing canned vegetables will decrease the sodium content by approximately 40 percent.

(They also recommend rinsing canned tuna!)

=^..^= MOLLY

Do yourself one better.  Get the kind without added salt, and then rinse it.  ;)
If you buy the kind without sodium it will end up costing you more.
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Original Post by ornellanicole2007:

If you buy the kind without sodium it will end up costing you more.
Around here it's the same price.
Original Post by dm84:

Original Post by ornellanicole2007:

If you buy the kind without sodium it will end up costing you more.
Around here it's the same price.

well not everyone lives "Around here" now do they?

nopey I dont think so.... [=

thanks everyone.  Those were the answers I was hoping for.

Also, with winter and lack of freezer space, sometimes it's nice to stock up on a few canned foods.

molly:  I didn't know 2-3 minutes was how long to rinse.  My rinsing has been a quick swish under water, not nearly that long.  Glad to know this.
Original Post by ohio45:

molly:  I didn't know 2-3 minutes was how long to rinse.  My rinsing has been a quick squish under water, not nearly that long.  Glad to know this.

I didn't know it until I poked around the Internet .... what a great question!

=^..^= MOLLY

cellulitedelight gave my suggestion - just buy the kind that doesn't have salt added.  Or go yourself one better and if you can't buy everything fresh (which of course we can't, especially in the off-season), buy frozen.  Particularly for green beans and peas (sweet peas, limas, etc.) they are SO much better tasting than canned.

(and for the record, "around here" - where I also happen to live, the no-salt-added are the same price.  and at the "around here" where I lived BEFORE, they were, too.)

"No sodium" canned items are still pretty hard to find in our local grocery stores (MD) -- but when found are the same price as the others.  Thanks for posting that hint, Molly -- like Ohio, I was only giving them a quick rinse
Am I ignorant to think every state, city, town has a Kroger in it?  If you're near one, seriously, look in the canned vegetable aisle.  You'll see a bunch of their canned vegetables are now "no salt added" and they're the same price as the regular cans.  And right now, actually, they're about fifty cents a can.  Thirty cents if you go absolute generic, which still has "no salt added" stuff.

Geez.  I'm going to petition Kroger now to open a few more stores.  There's only.. oh.. three down one street, two down the other, and one on the next block. :|
Original Post by cellulitedelight:

Am I ignorant to think every state, city, town has a Kroger in it? Geez.  I'm going to petition Kroger now to open a few more stores.  There's only.. oh.. three down one street, two down the other, and one on the next block. :|

Nope, no Krogers here. In fact, I don't think I've ever SEEN a Krogers. And we don't have a SuperWalmart here, either. Or a Raph's. Or a Raleys. Or a Piggly-Wiggly. Or an Aldi's.

But we have a Whole Foods and a Trader Joe's, so life is good. Cool

=^..^= MOLLY (living in Kroger-deprived California)

no Kroger's in MD, either.  No Publix, no Pig, no Harris-Teeter, no Bilo, or a bunch of others and, wow -- no $.50 cans of non-generic veggies, either -- I think I need to move...
i was just thinking about this this morning : it amazes me that people who comment online so often regard their experience as universal. no, there aren't krogers everywhere. we have HEB stores, which i don't think everyone else has everywhere. the point is : some stores charge more for some things in some areas, others do not. you're all right relative to your own experience. but be careful not to dismiss something just based on your experience - recognize that things may be different elsewhere.

it's not a given that anyone (or everyone) will have to pay more just because you do. they should check their local stores & find out for themselves. if you tell them it will cost more, which motivates them not to even check, then (especially if you are wrong) you're doing that person a disservice by spreading bad information on the superhighway.

i'm sure i'm guilty of it too, so i say let's all be a little more thoughtful & respectful of the fact that our experience may not be the last word on a matter, whether it be something small like the price of a can of no-salt veggies or something more significant.
I know that not everywhere has a kind of stores, but WalMarts and Krogers I thought were staples.  As will others who don't do a lot of travel.  Until a few years ago I'd never even heard of a WalMart because there wasn't one 'round these parts either.

But there are variations of these stores.  WalMart, KMart, Meijer, same thing to me.  They carry clothes, pets, and food.  And like WalMart, KMart and Meijer both have canned vegetables for decent prices, and have a low-sodium version that doesn't cost a penny more.

I've had those moments where I wonder what the heck a GMC is, and why everyone talked about it like it was the most popular store in the universe.  Eventually I realised a GMC, at least where I'm at, is just the produce part of a Rite Aid.  Which is pretty horrible when it comes to selection and prices, but people rave about it.

I assumed when I mentioned stores, people would have their own major chains similar to them.  If my Kroger is your Piggy-Wiggy doohickey, then at least you've got an idea as to what I'm talking about and can easily substitute the store name when you read through the comments.

And for those of you without a Kroger nearby, if I could give you one I would.  'Cause, like I said, I've got about six within walking distance.
Ive never heard of Krogers...there are Publixs here and albertsons, walmart, target, shoprite,c-town....lol
I'd be lost without Kroger, and now that I know they aren't everywhere, where ever Alex and I choose to move to I'm making sure they have one. 

Unless they have a store with dollar-seventy-six Hot Pockets and seventy-seven cent TV dinners.

FYI - Krogers = Fred Meyers in some places.  They also have a lot of other store names...however, around here I typically avoid Fred Meyers for food because its more expensive than Walmart (aka Sam's Club) or WinCo (only in Washington).  I think this is mainly because they focus more on electronics and household items instead of food.

Typically, in most areas you can find something that's a low cost food store...it may just have a different name.

i think all of our albertson's except 1 are gone now, and we have HEB and whole foods, and super targets & walmarts... i think there are krogers in houston.
It might work by soaking the veggies in a lot of water for a few minutes. After all soaking in water is how they get rid of salt in highly salted meat and fish that is salt preserved.  A way of conserving water too when you think of how much of your tap water will not touch the canned veggies in 3 minutes.  (three mins of a running tap could easily fill a bucket).    the other problem with rinsing is possible loss of nutrients - you will have to balance that with your need for lower salt. Everywhere it says steaming is preferable to boiling because the water leaches nutrients out of cut up vegetables..
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