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saturated fat in nuts bad??


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hii!! just curious, r the saturated fats in plain nuts (no salt added or seasonings, just plain) bad for you??

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Uh... there's like no saturated fat in nuts. Nuts have lots of unsaturated fats, which are very healthy. :)

Uh, nuts do have saturated fats in them....  However, they are an outstanding source of unsaturated fats, which makes them an ideal food -- just not one you should go overboard on.  Try to eat raw nuts where possible -- not oil roasted

Original Post by coach_k:

Uh, nuts do have saturated fats in them.... However, they are an outstanding source of unsaturated fats, which makes them an ideal food -- just not one you should go overboard on. Try to eat raw nuts where possible -- not oil roasted

Well I knew they had very little, but they're way outweighed by the unsaturated oils. It's a pretty small amount if you eat just a handful (so I just ignore it). :) Sorry for the misconception.

I hear you should have some amount of saturated fat in your diet, so don't worry too much about the amount in nuts =]

ok =D i just dont have a big appetite so i rely on foods like nuts and peanutbutter (only the 100% natural kind, tho!) to give me my calories for the day.  plus, theyre so tasty!

people today need to seroiusly rethink thier view of saturated fats, they have been part of tradition and healthy peoples diets for centrurys, and no degenerative illnesses struck those populations.

no heart diesese, etc...

Only recently with the advent of refined vegatable oils ( like canola, soy, etc.) and hydronenated oils have we started to get sick. butter is acutally a healthfood , and margarine is the devil

look up the weston a price foundation, they can tell ya more.

saturated fat also makes up a good amount of your cells membranes, and of course, you do still need healthy monounsaturated fats, but many americans get wayyyyy too many polyunsaturated fats ( like soy, safflower and cottonseed oils)
Nuts are very good for you and full of mostly unsaturated fats.. but I think they should really be consumed raw. I'm not 100% sure that roasting and cooking and heating all that unsaturated fat is a good idea because unsaturated fats are generally less stable and oxidize more rapidly when heated, and that's really what's bad for your heart and arteries.

So yeah.. don't sweat the "sat fat" in nuts. But DO count them because the calories can still get you.

dartrinton, whats wrong with too much polyunsaturated fat??

"dartrinton, whats wrong with too much polyunsaturated fat??"

Because:

"Polyunsaturated fats (PUFs) are greatly immunosuppressive, and anything that suppresses the immune system is likely to cause cancer. The first person to suggest that polyunsaturated fats cause cancer was Dr R A Newsholme of Oxford University, England"

'In 1989 there was a report of a ten-year trial at a Veterans' Administration Hospital in Los Angeles. In this trial half the patients were fed a diet which had double the amount of PUFs (Polyunsaturated fats) as compared to saturated fats. In the half of the patients on the high PUF diet there was a fifteen percent increase in cancer deaths compared to the saturated fat group."

"Since 1974, the increase of polyunsaturated fats has been blamed for the alarming increase in malignant melanoma (skin cancer) in Australia.  Polyunsaturated oils are oxidised readily by ultra-violet radiation from the sun and form harmful 'free radicals'. These are known to damage the cell's DNA and this can lead to the deregulation we call cancer. Saturated fats are stable. They do not oxidise and form free radicals. '

http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/fats_and_can cer.html
Original Post by dartrinton:

people today need to seroiusly rethink thier view of saturated fats, they have been part of tradition and healthy peoples diets for centrurys, and no degenerative illnesses struck those populations.

 

Yes, but up until the last century the average life span was about 40 years max.  Not much chance to develop heart disease...  and not many doctors to diagnose it if you did. 

hmmm. i never knew that about poly unsat fat

Original Post by karozel:

Original Post by dartrinton:

people today need to seroiusly rethink thier view of saturated fats, they have been part of tradition and healthy peoples diets for centrurys, and no degenerative illnesses struck those populations.

 

Yes, but up until the last century the average life span was about 40 years max.  Not much chance to develop heart disease...  and not many doctors to diagnose it if you did. 

 Actually, I did my degree in archaeology, and its a total myth that up until the last century the average life span was 40 years max. Go look at the tombstones in any old cemetery and you'll see plenty of tombstones for people who died in the early 1800's etc at ripe old ages. Obviously people didn't live as old, but they lived far beyond the age where the effects of a diet full of unhealthy fats would become apparent. Though of course, they had plenty of other health problems associated with diet and nutrition.

"Yes, but up until the last century the average life span was about 40 years max.  Not much chance to develop heart disease...  and not many doctors to diagnose it if you did" 

also, is living to 100 today really living? Many people live to ripe old age with plenty of illnesses, they are dependent on medication and medical aid. my grandfather lived to 84, he had parkinsans for at least 15 years before he died, he could barley walk.

(and yeah, i know i can barely spell)

granted, people back then still had major health problems, and agian, some of these were relatated to food/nutrition.

but of the reports from medical doctors of the time, even as far back as the roman doctor Cladius Galen. Very few people had the heart problems assosaited with foods today. Granted there was pallegra, malnutrition, scurvy, rickets, etc. But one would assume that if heart diesese existed in a large scale, they would have seen some reason why its happening. remember, the ancients weartn stupid, they were probably smarter than us.
Original Post by dartrinton:

people today need to seroiusly rethink thier view of saturated fats, they have been part of tradition and healthy peoples diets for centrurys, and no degenerative illnesses struck those populations.

no heart diesese, etc...

Only recently with the advent of refined vegatable oils ( like canola, soy, etc.) and hydronenated oils have we started to get sick. butter is acutally a healthfood , and margarine is the devil

look up the weston a price foundation, they can tell ya more.

saturated fat also makes up a good amount of your cells membranes, and of course, you do still need healthy monounsaturated fats, but many americans get wayyyyy too many polyunsaturated fats ( like soy, safflower and cottonseed oils)

it's true. you NEED saturated fats. just not as much as people usually get and not from the sources people usually get them from. nuts are healthy just don't go crazy. a small handful is usually a decent portion.

health sources of saturated fat, thats very good for you include cold water fish, coconut, nut butter/nuts, grass fed meat, dairy and butter, olive oil, etc....

there are plenty.
Sat fats are called this because they have all of their hydrogens and stack on top of each other.  This causes plaqe (sticky substanc) to form on your arterial walls eventually narrowing the flow of blood.  If plaque breaks off and blocks the blood flow the result is heart attack or stroke. Our bodies do produce enzymes to break down sat fats but it is very slow process.  Sat fat should be limited to no more than 10% of your total calories and this is a high estimate. 

Trans fats also stack like sat fats with the same result.  The difference between the two- in addition to trans being hydorgenated- we do not produce enzymes to metabolize them- hence they stick around (pun intended).  Trans came along in the 70s when it was all the rage to rid ourselves from sat fats.  Isn't it ironic- we will now see sat fats coming back to replace the trans- neither of them is a good option. 

The fats listed in dartrinton's post are good because of their omega 3 fatty acids- a type of polyunsat that is heart healthy.  However, I would argue that it's not the sat fat in those foods that are healthy but rather the polyunsat omega 3s.  They just happen to be a good source with a limited amount of sat fats.  Unless meat is lean- whether grass fed or otherwise- red meat typically has a lot of sat fat and should be limited. 
saturated fats are generally made of short and medium chain fatty acids, they are easier to digest and usually go to your liver to be used for energy, much faster than the long chain fatty acids of olive oil, etc.

Acutally most of the plague found in peoples viens is polyunsaturated, only about 20 percent is acutally saturated fat.
Sat fats are metabolized in the liver as LDL cholesterol (low density lipoproteins-sticky and artery clogging).  Omega 3s (Polyunsats) are metabolized as HDL (high density lipoproteins- these are known to help lower LDL.  Unless my physiogical, organic and biochemistry professors were all wrong. 
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