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Stevia!! - all natural sugar replacement


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Hey Everyone,
Stevia is a 0 calorie, natural sugar replacement. I found a conversion chart, because Stevia is super potent and sweet. This chart is based on a stevia brand with 90% stevioids.

Sugar ******** Stevia Blends Bulk ******** Stevia Clear Liquid
2 tsp  ************ ½ tsp ******************* ¼ tsp
¼ cup ************ 3 tsp ******************* ½ tsp
?? cup ************ 4 tsp ******************* ¾ tsp
½ cup ************ 6 tsp ****************** 1 ¼ tsp
¾ cup ************ 9 tsp ****************** 1 ¾ tsp
1 cup ************ 12 tsp ****************** 2 ½ tsp 
2 cups *********** 24 tsp ****************** 5 ¼ tsp

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I tried it before its pretty good.  I think you have to go to GNC to get it?  I don't know, someone gave some to me.
Hi kari,

Just a heads up for anyone out there considering using stevia.  The conversion differs greatly depending on the form and brand of stevia used.

I've always used Stevita brand stevia, which is almost pure stevia. The conversion for brand I use, both the powdered form and the liquid form, conforms to this conversion chart which is 1 teaspoon = 1 cup of sugar.  Your conversion chart is 1/4 cup = 1 cup of sugar.  That would be way, Way, WAY too much of the form I use. 

I use a packet form for sweetening my morning oatmeal, also stevita brand, and use 1 packet, which is more than I would use of the straight powdered form.

And this conversion chart is different than both of ours!

So, unfortunately, a little trial is necessary.  Start with what your brand recommends, and if that's not available, err on the side of too little (I love stevia, I use it all the time, but too much stevia is NOT a good thing!).

I don't know... I'm wary of all the artificial sweeteners.  In fact, just yesterday, I read an article about what each can potentially cause, and that it's best to stick with natural sweeteners.

I just use sugar (brown, whenever possible), syrup, agave nectar, etc., but in moderation.  Aspartame, splenda, stevia, etc. all are unsettling to me...
nicole, I'll jump in here to say I'm sure someone will be along to tell you that stevia is "all natural." Well, so are poisonous mushrooms, hemlock, and belladonna. "All natural" does not automatically mean "safe."

Stevia is an herb, so IS different from true artificial sweeteners. Stevia is generally thought to be safe... in small amounts. But the US, Canada, and EU have not approved it for use as a food additive (much to the disappointment of the stevia lobby). There is concern about one of the metabolites of stevia being a carcinogen. Only Brazil and Japan have approved stevia as a food additive, and only in a few products.

So that's why this herbal "all natural" sweetener is not found in sodas, baked goods, cereals, and the bazillions of other foods on our supermarket shelves. It is available from "health" food stores; it can be sold in the US as a supplement, so that's how it's marketed.
Oh... did not know it was an herb; thanks, Athena...  in the article I read, it was listed as not-so-safe, along with the artificial ones, so I assumed it was as well...  And what you just said is basically exactly what I had read

Either way, sounds kinda bogus to me...
I use Stevia, like it, no chemicals.

I can buy mine at Fred Meyers as well.
I use stevia in my iced herbal teas.  It comes in both liquid and granulated form and can even be used in cooking and baking.  I use the liquid in my teas and get it from a local herbal store.  Mind you, I have been studying and researching the medicinal uses for herbs for the last 5 years and hope to go to school to be certified in herbal medicine in the future (finances willing).
? Is it available in Canada....
yes, canadianchick, it is. as a dietary supplement, the same classification it has in the US. 

It hasn't been said yet, so I'm going to be the one who says stevia is all natural.  A member of the Chrysanthemum family (hardly hemlock! c'mon!).  It's been used for centuries as a sweetener in South America, and has about 40% of the sweetener market in Japan, has had for decades. The Japanese have tested it extensively and found it without health risk and millions of Japanese have been using it for the past 30 years with no reported negative effects. 

Before a food can be approved as a food additive in the US, it must prove itself to be safe.  To date the FDA has said the information presented is inadequate to meet their burden of proof. 

The FDA can't ban a product, however, unless they can prove it's unsafe.  They cannot.  Which is why stevia can be sold as a dietary supplement.

It all reeks of the FDA protecting big pharma, who has quite a financial interest in making sure no cheap natural sweetener bumps aspartame and sucrolose off our shelves.
Stevia can be found now in Walmart and other stores..
If you look in drug stores or health food stores you can find Stevia (poweder or liquid) with the supplements since it can't be sold as an artificial sweetner in Canada.
Thank you so much for posting all this info about Stevia. It has answered many of my questions.  I've tagged it.
Stevia is an all natural sweetener. It's a plant that contains stevoids. So it's not artificial like splenda, etc.
Original Post by athena_tavener:

nicole, I'll jump in here to say I'm sure someone will be along to tell you that stevia is "all natural." Well, so are poisonous mushrooms, hemlock, and belladonna. "All natural" does not automatically mean "safe."

Stevia is an herb, so IS different from true artificial sweeteners. Stevia is generally thought to be safe... in small amounts. But the US, Canada, and EU have not approved it for use as a food additive (much to the disappointment of the stevia lobby). There is concern about one of the metabolites of stevia being a carcinogen. Only Brazil and Japan have approved stevia as a food additive, and only in a few products.

So that's why this herbal "all natural" sweetener is not found in sodas, baked goods, cereals, and the bazillions of other foods on our supermarket shelves. It is available from "health" food stores; it can be sold in the US as a supplement, so that's how it's marketed.

This sounds very slightly like scare-mongering... not an accusation, that's just how it comes off.  Newer studies related to Stevia show absolutely no negative side effects, including the supposed metabolism of stevioside and rebaudioside into mutagens. A quote from Wikipedia (which cites its source), "this finding has been criticized on procedural grounds that the data were mishandled in such a way that even distilled water would appear mutagenic."  So, I think with the newer research that it is a safe and effective alternative to sugar and other artificial sweeteners.  In addition to the lack of negative effects, other studies have shown a possible connection between the consumption of stevia and increased insulin sensitivity, though more research would have to be done on stevia to ensure that the results of those studies were accurate.  Overall, Stevia is great, and the FDA should definitely consider changing its status from supplement to additive.

I enjoy Stevia in my tea, but would love to find the flavoured kind for my water.  Does anyone know where I could find this?  (I'm in Canada btw)

I'm growing some Stevia this year. I found the herb at my local greenhouse. I haven't looked into how to use it yet as an herb. The suggestion on the label was to use the leaves fresh and crushed in teas and lemonade to add sweetness. It also said dried powdered leaves could be added to drinks/teas and fruit salads as a natural sweetener.

Anyone have more info about it?

i'm in canada, and i found it at the great canadian superstore.

unfortunately, i thought it tasted gross.

Meima, you'll find some flavored stevia-based mixes here:

http://steviasmart.com/stevitastevia.html

but I prefer to keep things as close to nature as possible, so I make my own stevia lemonade simply by combining stevia with fresh lemon juice and water (I use either liquid stevia or mix the powdered with some warm water firm to dissolve it since it doesn't dissolve easily in cold water). Stevia is also great in herbal and rooibos teas. My local Teavana has me hooked on several herbal concoctions, caribbean breeze combined with apple lemon pomegranate, wow that's good stuff!

#19  
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All stevia products are different, it all depends on the company, where the stevia is grown, how it is extracted, and how it is processed. There are pure and blended products, always read the label to know what you are getting! I recommend trying samples, most companies send these out. Currently, Stevita Co. is sampling their pure powder (Simply-Stevia) and a granulated blend (Spoonable Stevia). They are also sending samples of their fruit flavored powder mixes, which are great mixed in water. To request samples, go to www.stevitastevia.com. Unfortunately, this offer is available only in the US.

Stevia can be used in beverages and foods without raising blood sugar. The flavors (both in powder & liquid form) is great in oatmeal, gelatin (make your own!) Cool Whip, yogurt - it has been beneficial in satisfying my sweet tooth without causing spikes in blood sugar!

Stevia is plant based and should not be put in the same category with the non-nutritive sugar substitutes.  One can even dry the leaves of the stevia plant and use them; however, the processed brands are much easier to use.

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