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Weighing food- before or after cooking?


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Is there a "right" way to weigh food- should I measure before or after cooking?  Does anyone know what this site does?  i.e. CC says 4 oz of "fresh boneless, skinless chicken breast" is 112 calories- is that 4 oz raw or 4 oz cooked?  I know some foods are listed as cooked a certain way- boiled, baked, etc. but often the foods aren't listed the way I specifically cook them, so what's the most accurate choice on the list for me to chose?  I am trying to be as accurate as possible with tallying my calories.

TIA for your help!!

7 Replies (last)
I believe you are referring to this TYSON item which has that exact description.

On the Tyson site, it is listed HERE which is frozen, uncooked.
When I decide to weigh meats I weight it out fresh/raw.  I have to retrain my eye to see a portion of meat as 4-6 ounces as I have been known to wolf down a 20 ounce ribeye.  I figure if it is 4 ounces raw, it will be a prudent estimate of calories vs 4 ounces of cooked after the water weight is evaporated out of the meat.  I am surprised how 6 ounces of chicken meat is really quite a bit, and then all those veggies I'm eating now....damn filling meal i've created there.
#3  
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Original Post by mykanosdelight:

When I decide to weigh meats I weight it out fresh/raw.  I have to retrain my eye to see a portion of meat as 4-6 ounces as I have been known to wolf down a 20 ounce ribeye.  I figure if it is 4 ounces raw, it will be a prudent estimate of calories vs 4 ounces of cooked after the water weight is evaporated out of the meat.  I am surprised how 6 ounces of chicken meat is really quite a bit, and then all those veggies I'm eating now....damn filling meal i've created there.

 It's not accurate.

With meat, only the cooked weight is accurate, especially in the case of red meat, because fat will run out of the meat during the cooking process. The more fat that runs out, the fewer calories it has. 

#4  
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Original Post by dm84:

Original Post by mykanosdelight:

When I decide to weigh meats I weight it out fresh/raw.  I have to retrain my eye to see a portion of meat as 4-6 ounces as I have been known to wolf down a 20 ounce ribeye.  I figure if it is 4 ounces raw, it will be a prudent estimate of calories vs 4 ounces of cooked after the water weight is evaporated out of the meat.  I am surprised how 6 ounces of chicken meat is really quite a bit, and then all those veggies I'm eating now....damn filling meal i've created there.

 It's not accurate.

With meat, only the cooked weight is accurate, especially in the case of red meat, because fat will run out of the meat during the cooking process. The more fat that runs out, the fewer calories it has. 

 

This is exactly what I was thinking- clearly cooked meat will weigh less and have less fat, therefore fewer calories. So if a "serving" is considered 3 oz, I should assume that means 3 oz cooked, right? Thanks for all the replies.
#5  
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Yeah a "serving" is 4 oz raw, 3 oz cooked.
#6  
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I was on the Physician's Weight loss plan where all my food had to be weighed. They told me to weigh all meat after cooking.

Unless I'm eating steak or other plain grilled meat (easy to weigh out after cooking) I just weigh my meat before cooking and don't worry too much about a change in calorie content. I generally eat really lean meat, or it is cooked into stews and sauces and what little fat there is isn't going anywhere.

There's always a trade off between convenience and accuracy.  

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