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White flecks on peach pits?


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Hi all,

I LOVE peaches and have been eating up a storm of them since they've been in season.  It occurred to me to turn here though to ask a question I have long wondered... 

About half the time I notice that there are these little white flecks scattered among the folds in the pit.  They almost look like sea salt grains.  I tend to eat my peaches by cutting them in half, removing the pit, and then slicing them.  (Most of the time I then add some cottage cheese & granola... it's my favorite summer lunch!)  When I remove the pit, some remain stuck to the pit, some are stuck to the bits of peach that were previously tucked into the folds.  My best guess would be that it's mold.. but the peaches taste fine, don't smell funky, aren't bruised, aren't overripe, etc. 

I usually just cut off the bits that have the little flakes to them and eat the rest.. I've never gotten sick.  But what the heck is it!?  Anyone know?

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It's definitely not mold. I always assumed it to be similiar in nature to the white part of an orange, like it helps hold the pit to the fruit the way in an orange it helps hold the fruit to the peel.

Huh, hadn't thought of it that way.  Makes sense. 

Any idea why it would be on/in some peaches and not others?  (I don't mean white vs. yellow.. I've seen it in both, it just doesn't seem to be a consistent phenomenon from day to day as I have my daily summer peach.  Weird.)

Cling vs loose? I'm not sure. I actually don't each peaches with terrible frequency, though they are delish!

I've been looking on the net for about 30 minutes. And went on the first few pages of about.com, google and yahoo.serach.  However, I found a great recipe for I WON'T MENTION  and I learned how they bake a checkerboard cake. I never had a clue. Really quite interesting. Thanks for this thread. I now know how they do the checkerboard.

#5  
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Just based on experience, I think the white flecks are generally associated with freestone peaches.  I don't think I've ever seen them on clingstone peaches.

I think they might be a residual part of whatever loosely connected the stone to the peach as it grew and ripened.

moreninhaboy- glad I could help lol :)

amh042- I had no idea there were different varieties, though it makes complete sense when I think about how some pits come out so easily and others are practically superglued to the damn fruit.  I must just be buying some of one, and some of another and not knowing the difference.  I know yellow vs. white, I guess now I'll know to ask about what type of "stone" variety it is, too. :)  Thanks!

Besides finding that great recipe for (I WON'T MENTION) and the checkerboard cake, did learn that peaches never ripen.  When you buy them, that is it.  They will get softer as they deteriorate, but they will never get sweeter.  That must be why I have mostly chosen nectarines over peaches, when offered an option.  

Also of interest is the preferred way that Italians eat peaches.  Quite continental actually.  Slice the peach and place in a wine glass, adding some sugar to taste and EITHER red or white wine. They then skewer the sliced peach sections with the pointy end of a knife. I have a great friend who lives in Veneza, Massimo, that I'll have to ask about this. But then Venetians are quite different. They do live on top of a sewer. Maybe they might prefer not to skewer.

#8  
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Original Post by iamacommitmentto:

moreninhaboy- glad I could help lol :)

amh042- I had no idea there were different varieties, though it makes complete sense when I think about how some pits come out so easily and others are practically superglued to the damn fruit.  I must just be buying some of one, and some of another and not knowing the difference.  I know yellow vs. white, I guess now I'll know to ask about what type of "stone" variety it is, too. :)  Thanks!

 I learned about the different types because I do canning.  Trying to quarter and can clingstone peaches would be a nightmare!  They all taste just as good though.  :)

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