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carbs make me TIRED


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i just noticed this- [starchy] carbs make me really tired!  aren't you supposed to have lots of energy after eating carbs?  for example, this morning i had lots of crackers (whole grain kashi TLCs and spelt flat breads) and broccoli for breakfast and went about my usual activities and after a bout 45 minutes (i was just playing piano), i just couldn't keep my eyes open!  so i took a nap... had to force myself to get up after about an hour and 20 min.  is this normal?  i wasn't stuffed after i ate- just full (so its not like i was tired from overeating).  could this possibly point to a gluten sensitivity?    

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when you say a lot of crakers? what do you mean? did you eat the whole box? 

I have the same problem and I feel  very tired and sluggish after eating a lot of refined carbs and sugar. simply your blood sugar goes up then drops down so you feel tired.

Gluten senstivty could be a possibilty. You have to check with your doc. But I have to tell you that even if you are not senstive to gluten, you would still feel tired after eating a lot of refined carbs and sugar. I am not senstive to glutin and I feel very tired after I eat lots of carbs.

Change your breakfast. There are tons of ideas on this website to give you examples.

Good luck:) 

i personally think its because you had just carbs and nothing else for breakfast; no protein or healthy fats.

i personally think its because you had just carbs and nothing else for breakfast; no protein or healthy fats.

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thanks for the replies

safina1- i ate like... 550 calories worth i would guess.  like 2 servings of the TLCs and 3 servings of the flatbreads.  they were whole grain, so refined carbs doesn't really apply..

ktjo- hmm... maybe ill try adding guacamole tom.  i don't wanna add protein cuz i find i feel much better when i follow the "one concentrated food type per meal" rule (i.e. no mixing carbs with protein, no mixing fruit with anything [with the exception of a small amount of constipating fruit after the meal to seal off ur stomach- small apple, half a banana...], and veggies go with anything).  i know people say this makes no sense, but i tried it for a while, felt great, went off of it cuz i have such terrible sugar cravings that i didn't know what to do with myself if i couldn't eat carbs after eating protein, and even when i managed to stay off of sugar for days at a time, i still didn't feel as good as i did when i was eating one concentrated food type per meal.  so now i have recently gotten rid of ALL that tempting refined sugar and also nuts (because i found that if i couldn't have sugar, i'd start eating ridiculous amounts of nuts... so until i'm over the sugar addiction, im staying away from nuts too) and im starting that way of eating again... fats like oil and avocado are allowed to be mixed with carbs so ill try doing that and see what happens

watch for the sodium intake in these crakers. 

why don't you have oatmeal and avocado for breakfast?? I used to that for a while and it was good.

 

http://caloriecount.about.com/metabolic-types -eating-ft93247

check that link out if you haven't already. hope this helps!

Original Post by homesick18:

safina1- i ate like... 550 calories worth i would guess.  like 2 servings of the TLCs and 3 servings of the flatbreads.  they were whole grain, so refined carbs doesn't really apply..

... maybe ill try adding guacamole tom.  i don't wanna add protein cuz i find i feel much better when i follow the "one concentrated food type per meal" rule (i.e. no mixing carbs with protein, no mixing fruit with anything [with the exception of a small amount of constipating fruit after the meal to seal off ur stomach- small apple, half a banana...], and veggies go with anything).  i know people say this makes no sense...

You're at least right that it makes no sense. The idea of separating macronutrients began as a diet idea much like the low-carb craze. By having rules about what you can and can't eat, participants lost weight because they were eating less overall (eg, skipping the carbs when having dinner). However, there's no logic to the actual rules themselves.

Very few foods contain only one food group. Most dairy contains fat, carbs and protein. Crackers usually contain fat as well as carbs. Beans, chickpeas, lentils: carbs and protein, sometimes fat (eg edamame beans). Meat: protein and fat. Check out the nutrition panels of whatever you're eating - I doubt you've actually succeeded in separating the macronutrient groups. In addition, you would have to wait several hours between each meal to ensure you weren't eating one macronutrient while another was still digesting. And if fats and carbs can be mixed, why not protein? Most protein sources also contain fat. I suspect the fat-mixing rule was broken because it's pretty hard to eat fat on its own. And if vegetables (mostly carbs) can be eaten with anything, why not other carbs?

Your intended way of eating is not actually impossible. But even if it were, it's the definition of unbalanced. A balanced meal contains a good mix of protein, good carbs and fat. If you are planning on eating guacamole with your crackers, bear in mind that a cup of avocado contains 22g fat, 13g carbs and 3g protein. Avocado is a great nutritious food - I'm just pointing out that it hardly contains only fat.

Eating crackers without fat or protein means they would have been digested a lot faster. This would cause a blood sugar spike, followed by a slump which made you feel tired. Kashi crackers may be advertised as "wholegrain" but they are still pretty processed and refined foods, and not exactly an ideal breakfast. If you are looking for better carbs to eat for breakfast, try muesli (baked rolled oats with seeds, bran flakes and fruit, sort of like granola with less fat and sugar) or steel-cut oatmeal. I'd recommend adding some yoghurt or milk to the oatmeal for protein, but even if you don't, it'd still be much more sustaining and less likely to make you tired. Wholegrain breads (especially sprouted grain breads) would also be much healthier and less refined than crackers. Be wary of foods that come in packets which claim they're wholegrain; it means they contain some wholegrains, not that they are unprocessed and unrefined. Start reading ingredient lists.

If you want sustaining energy, research low-gi eating. It's much healthier and more logical than trying to separate nutrients that usually occur together in nature anyway.

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