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Would you eat cooking spray with Isobutane and Propane on the ingredient list?


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Its in Pam... I don't know what to think! Maybe I should just stick to oil...

I asked in the "food" section if anybody had any knowledge of this being safe, but got no response.

Edited Mar 26 2010 03:35 by nycgirl
Reason: Moved from WL to Health & Support
15 Replies (last)

I had no idea. I tend to use i can't believe its not butter spray. which ive never peeked at the ingredients of

Hmmmmmmmmmmm...you made me look at the evoo spray I use.  It has "propellant" as one of the ingredients.  So what is in that propellant?  Hmmmmmm...I shall research further.

It's probably safe.

But come on, it get's sprayed out of a can, how good for you can it be?

Ingredients in the "propellant"?

  • nitrous oxide
  • carbon dioxide
  • soy lecithin (not part of the propellant [?] but in the spray)

Maybe taking a teaspoon of evoo and rubbing it on would be better?

This is from the '99 report by the European Commission: Scientific Committee on Food:

"Conclusion

In view of the low residue level of propellant gases the SCF has no toxicological concerns about the use of water-based emulsion sprays and oil-based aerosol sprays for baking and frying purposes, which contain propane, butane or iso-butane."

 

 

Propane is a gas at room temperature.  It's in there so that the Pam comes out as a spray rather than a squirt.  Did that make any sense?  Probably not.  But the point is that you're not going to be consuming either the propane or the isobutane because they evaporate on their way out of the can.

That said, it's a lot cheaper to just put a little oil on a paper towel or cloth and rub down the pan with it.

I bought a Misto instead for ~$12 and some cheap store-brand olive oil for $8. I still have half the bottle of oil left. If I was using Pam, I'd have used 2 bottle by now. So the lesson: Invest in a Misto! You'll save money and you don't have to worry about propane in your spray!

Original Post by cellophane_star:

I bought a Misto instead for ~$12 and some cheap store-brand olive oil for $8. I still have half the bottle of oil left. If I was using Pam, I'd have used 2 bottle by now. So the lesson: Invest in a Misto! You'll save money and you don't have to worry about propane in your spray!

I shall look for it, buy it on line, or buy a similar product.  Thanks.

People eat cooking spray? Gotta love diet inventions.

Original Post by neanderthin:

People eat cooking spray?

I would think so.  At least in the same way people eat cooking oil when frying things in it.  I put cooking spray, for example, on my salmon before I pan fry it.  I put cooking spray on my sliced potatoes before I bake them.  I put cooking spray on my baking dishes before I bake whole wheat bread and cake in them.  So I am assuming that I end up eating some of the cooking spray.  

Thus, the reasons I am interested in the Misto are 1) not to get any propellant from them 2) save money 3) not put as much "vapor" into the air that the cooking spray causes.

I was being facetious shane. Of course people eat cooking spray......Try buying a pump and using that instead, you also get to pick the oil instead of leaving to proctor and gamble et al buying the cheapest refined oil that's available on the market.....pam = crap

Hmmm i'm no chm whiz but isn't butane just Carbon-Carbon-Carbon-Carbon with hydrogens stuck on all its other bond-points?  And propane just C-C-C with some more hydrogen?  I eat carbon and hydrogen all the time :)  I don't think I'm going to get too worked up over a few more carbons in my meal.  After all... what is butter but CH3(CH2)7CH=CH(CH2)7COOH?  Looks a lot scarier than CH3-CH2-CH3 propane.   :)

Original Post by neanderthin:

I was being facetious shane. Of course people eat cooking spray......Try buying a pump and using that instead, you also get to pick the oil instead of leaving to proctor and gamble et al buying the cheapest refined oil that's available on the market.....pam = crap

For being a jokester myself, I surely miss some of the humorous comments.  Sorry!

In any case, I, for whatever reason, had not thought about getting a Misto type device, so am looking forward to giving it a try.  I think I will get two -- one for evoo and one for peanut or sunflower.

Original Post by shane_paladin:

Original Post by neanderthin:

I was being facetious shane. Of course people eat cooking spray......Try buying a pump and using that instead, you also get to pick the oil instead of leaving to proctor and gamble et al buying the cheapest refined oil that's available on the market.....pam = crap

For being a jokester myself, I surely miss some of the humorous comments.  Sorry!

In any case, I, for whatever reason, had not thought about getting a Misto type device, so am looking forward to giving it a try.  I think I will get two -- one for evoo and one for peanut or sunflower.

Haha.......... no worries, my fault. I'm still trying to figure out how to delivery my sarcasm without an explanation, obviously I haven't succeeded yet.

Pam and other sprays are just expensive gimmicks selling to people that think fat is a bad nutrient and should be replaced with good nutrients. The problem is people are paying a lot of money for a very small amount of oil, and not a very good quality oil at that.......To get an actual litre of oil from pam I would think it would be in the 25.00 to 30.00 area.........My everyday EVOO which is a good spanish olive oil is 23.00 for a 3 litre container. just saying.

Two things that I have noticed about using a can of cooking spray are 1) that quite a bit of the "vapor" does go into the air and 2) also on the stove top, refrigerator side, etc.  I am guessing if I go to a manual pump-type device I will not be breathing the vapor or greasing up the kitchen as much.

htracy:I did give you a prompt answer in the food section, even tailored it to your background as a Ch Engineer. Essentially, propane and butane do not come from the distillation column as pure substances, and consider that the starting mixture for the separation is a petrochemical.

to the pump aficionados:  I tried a manual pump spray (with olive oil) at a friends house, and oil got all over my hand. Where they stored it in their cupboard looked pretty nasty too. Is this the case with many of the pumps, or was that an especially bad one?

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