Motivation
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Why can't I stick to a diet?


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I'm so confused, I'm usually a very logical person and if I see something that needs to be done I figure out how and I do it. I thought weight loss would just be another bump in the road but it's not it's the **** Everest in the middle of my road. Why can't I just get over it?

So I found what works for me - calorie restriction, it's simple math, not too strict, not starving, just losing weight in a sensible speed. The first couple of days are always awesome, I don't think about food excessively, I don't starve myself, I drink plenty of water and everything seems to be going great. But then comes a moment when I just don't feel like continuing like this and I eat something, then something more, and something more. And I can never seem to control myself even if I know it's coming. And if this continued for one day it would be fine but it goes on like this for at least a week, the next day I wake up feeling fat, which makes me depressed and not stick to my diet. I don't feel left out or deprived or anything like that I just stop dieting.

What is this? I know what I want to do, I know how to do it, so why can't I? Any advice on how to deal with this would be greatly appreciated.

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Lose the word DIET from your vocabulary. Diets mean deprivation, denial, and depression. Instead, view it as a different way of eating that you are going to continue for life. Work some of those things into your eating plan each day that you enjoy, and don't ever allow yourself to get too hungry.

When I get the urge to grab something that is not part of what I plan to eat, I do something else for just ten minutes, and usually those urges leave. I also delay rather than deny myself -- if I want candy, I plan for it and look forward to it. I think I actually enjoy foods more than I used to.

Don't try to make any changes in your eating plan that you can't do for life. If that means slowing your weight loss, so be it. 

Also, you seem to understand your patterns pretty well. If it is Day 3 that always trips you up, plan to do something that day that keeps you from the food temptation. 

I'm sure that you've heard all of these things before -- most of us are have spent our lives reading any weight loss advice that comes down the pike.  When you're feeling weak, come here and read some of the success stories. . . anything to get over the rough patch.  If you can get through the first week or two, it really does get much easier.  

I totally understand what you mean. I always start out with the best intentions and stick to my exercise/eating plan. Then a few days or even weeks go by and I lose a little weight, then I hit Mt Everest and snack too much, too many times, and the rest is history.

I found  a suggestion from Dr. Oz that I'm trying and so far, so good. Breathstrips. They satisfy that feeling of opening a package and putting something in my mouth. Then the taste is SO strong that I don't have the urge to eat anything. Good luck to you!!!

My quit mark is around day twenty, but I know exactly what you are thinking and feeling. My best advice for you is passing along what others have given me.

i. When you get the urge for the junk, brush your teeth. Nothing tastes good with mint-mouth.
ii. Do not keep junk around, especially items you are weakest against. You are less likely to buy it if you have to make a special trip for it.
iii. If you must have it, remove it from packaging and eat half a portion, but only after drinking an entire glass of water.
iv. Make one day a week a time that you are a little less strict about your adherence, such as allow yourself an extra 200 or 300 calories that day. It will lengthen the time until you reach your goal, but you may prove more successful by less chance of "going crazy".
v. Never skip a meal, and try real hard to always make sure your dinner is three hours (or more) before you sleep.
vi. Drink more water than you think is even humanly possible. I've noticed half my hunger cravings are actually thirst cravings.
vii. Going back to allowing extra calories, maybe you personally can do that every three days for a couple weeks, then lengthen to every four days, etc. Again, longer time to success but probably more likely to get that success.
viii. Patience is a great virtue. We don't see results fast, so try weighing and measuring only once a week.
ix. This is very important. Stop telling yourself you don't have the willpower. Yes you do. If you tell yourself you don't have the power, then you don't and it's a self-fulfilling prophecy.
x. Come onto the boards often, especially in those weak moments. We are all in this together, whether it is 15 pounds or 150 pounds.

Make sure your expectations are realistic.  If you're impatient and are restricting your calories too much, you'll be hungry and resentful and more likely to bail.

Get out of the diet mindset.  Diets are temporary, which is why we gain it all back when we go off of them.  Aim to move more, eat more sensibly, and not deprive yourself.

Be patient.

Create a no-fail environment.  Stop buying foods that tempt you to overeat, and stock your kitchen with healthy foods that are easy to grab and eat (bananas, apples, carrot sticks) so you'll be less likely to grab junk when you're in a hurry.

This won't be painless, especially at first.  We all feel fat sometimes.  It will pass.  The trick is that you have to push yourself on intellectually even when you don't feel like doing so emotionally. 

Find a support network. 

Original Post by pkwiers:

Lose the word DIET from your vocabulary. Diets mean deprivation, denial, and depression. Instead, view it as a different way of eating that you are going to continue for life.

I completely agree with this ^^.

You need to adjust your eating to a way you can be comfortable continuing for the rest of your life. That means not cutting out every food you love, not severely limiting calories, and not having ridiculous expectations.

I've gone on "diets" countless times and they've never worked. You need to find what exactly is going to work for you...losing weight isn't a one size fits all type thing. Some people might cut out all sweets from their eating and be able to stick to that for the rest of their life besides a few times a year....I know that would never work for me. I have a huge sweet tooth and I eat a treat every night and still lose weight.

What works for me is trying to eat pretty healthy the entire day and then in the evening I allow myself to have air popped popcorn with fake butter spray on it (it has 0 calories) and some salt. I also have one treat each night. But I always measure it out (like half a cup of frozen yogurt with 1 TBS of chocolate sauce or something) and I plan for that in my calories. Doing this prevents me from feeling deprived and punished, which is exactly how I would feel if I tried to cut out all sweets and snacks from my eating. Maybe this is something that will work for you.

Original Post by pkwiers:

Lose the word DIET from your vocabulary.

 this

I have cut out the word "diet" from my vocabulary. I have realized that I had to change my lifestyle, which includes a daily meal plan and exercise - but it is also a mind set.

I prepare myself a daily meal plan which I can stick with. (That works for me: Low calorie, low fat, low carbohydrates, low sodium and sugar free). On 2 days a week I eat whatever else I fancy, but I do make sure that my daily calorie count stays within the suggested C C calorie consumption. I do make sure that I add a little more exercise after I those days. I try NOT to think about next month, the next holidays - I take it week by week, from weigh in to weigh in. (Every Monday, so I watch what I am eating on Sunday). I have started on 169 kg - 372 pounds and so far have lost 73 pounds - I am now just under 300 pounds.

You can do it!

Im currently having the same problem, I do good for a week or 2 and then I eat one thing I know I shouldnt and just keep eatting bad stuff. Sometimes I just want something sweet or want a snack, and even if im within my calories I feel horrible, but them am like f*** it and keep eatting it because I already a few bites, might as well finish. But then other times Im completly fine and resist any urge to eat something and I dont know why it keeps happening. Should I just not keep any of those foods around and not eat them? or what? Its very frustrating to have worked so hard and then pick up with bad eatting habits when for a week or 2 or 3, im completly fine?!

me too.........and i'm hungry all the time.  i've lost almost 100 pounds but need to lose at least 50 more and it seems to have become IMPOSSIBLE.  I don't know what to eat anymore and nothing LOW cal or Healthy tastes good!!!!

It's easier to stick to a lifestyle than a diet...

Original Post by lkjohnston:

me too.........and i'm hungry all the time.  i've lost almost 100 pounds but need to lose at least 50 more and it seems to have become IMPOSSIBLE.  I don't know what to eat anymore and nothing LOW cal or Healthy tastes good!!!!

Well you have to remember that at the beginning you burned more calories because you were chugging around another 100 pounds. You could get very similar results by loading a backpack with 100 pounds of weight and lugging it around all day long.

Are you measuring your arms, thighs, etc.? The scale doesn't know the difference between fat and muscle. You could still be losing the fat but gaining muscle.

I think that there are tons of options of healthy foods that are very enjoyable, just not any prepared, ready-to-eat ones (blargh!). If you look around here on CC and ask for recipes and whatnot, you will get lots of help with meal ideas that will work for you. If you think you're on a diet, it is a terrible experience. Think of it as changing your bad habits for good ones.

Original Post by lkjohnston:
nothing LOW cal or Healthy tastes good!!!!

Time to expand your food horizons.

For one: Sweet and/or salty junk foods make it harder to taste healthy foods (that haven't been enhanced with sugar and salt), so fruit, vegetables, etc. won't tastes as good to you until you've broken the junk-food habit.  That part is a steep hill to climb, I know, but it's worth it.

For two: Experiment.  I had a friend who "hated fruit".  Turns out, she didn't like apples because her mother only ever bought cheap, flavorless, Red Delicious in the bulk bags.  Once she started buying other cultivars that had more flavor, she learned to like them.  Also, because she didn't like it, she wasn't in the habit of eating it and it was hard for her to figure out how to fit fruit into her daily food routine.  It can take practice.  But it's worth it.

Original Post by ootek:
For one: Sweet and/or salty junk foods make it harder to taste healthy foods (that haven't been enhanced with sugar and salt), so fruit, vegetables, etc. won't tastes as good to you until you've broken the junk-food habit.  That part is a steep hill to climb, I know, but it's worth it.

This is very true. I had to put lots and lots of sugar into my tea to make it taste good. When I stopped drinking soda, I cut the amount of sugar by half and then some. The same is true for the salty stuff too. The bottom line is the good stuff is more "mild" than the extremes and until we break the addiction we can't be happy. I guess it is sort of like someone who like being on drugs; the normal highs of life aren't enough until the drugs are out of their systems.

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