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Can I get into graduate school with a 2.4 undergrad GPA?


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I am an undergrad student at Hunter College, New York, majoring in Psychology. Right now, I have a 2.45 cumulative GPA. I earned 93 credits. I messed up during my freshman and sophomore years because I was immature. I watched movies and listened to music instead of studying. I am working as a lab technician at a neuroscience lab. I am planning to get a Masters degree in social work or counseling. I will try to raise my GPA to a 3.0 by the time I graduate. If I will end up with a 2.4 GPA, would it be impossible to get into a graduate school? Could I get a good job with only a Bachelors degree in Psychology? 

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directly from undergrad?  probably not.  if you work for a few years, volunteer, build your resumé, work on your writing and research skills, keep doing course work, get some real experience under your belt, definitely.

you can get a job with a psych degree, but don't expect to get rich.

Original Post by pgeorgian:

directly from undergrad?  probably not.  if you work for a few years, volunteer, build your resumé, work on your writing and research skills, keep doing course work, get some real experience under your belt, definitely.

you can get a job with a psych degree, but don't expect to get rich.

I agree with this.

Why don't you consult with an academic advisor at your university?  They might give you a better indication of whether you can expect to get into graduate school with less than 3.0 GPA.

If you start working right after obtaining your undergraduate degree, I think you will likely end up in a field that doesn't specifically require a psychology degree.

My ex-fiance is a social worker--he only has a Bachelor's in Psychology. If he had a Master's, he would get paid more for the same job. He makes a decent living, though. He brought home around $3,600 a month after taxes.

I'd work on raising the GPA. I was shocked when one of my friends got into grad school--she had something like a 2.0! And her degree was in buisness management, lol. She dropped out a couple months ago, though. *rolls eyes*

You don't stand a good chance with that GPA, especially if there are a lot of other applicants in your field. I actually had to have a conference with the VAO board regarding a Bio grade from my Freshman year (I failed because I skipped too much and had to re-take it)! If there are a lot of people clamoring to get in, they nitpick like crazy. Then again, there may be a different system in place where you live.

Can you get in some volunteer work or anything? If you want to be a social worker, substitue teaching, helping out at homeless shelters, umpiring or coaching little league, etc. are all things that would help--it's what my ex did.

#4  
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Not sure how far the bachelors in Psych goes.

My GPA was about a 2.3 in undergrad. I worked as a bartender for a couple of years before taking and doing pretty well on the LSATs. Most schools I applied to rejected me. A couple accepted me.

I went to a law school that gave people a chance, but you had to make the cut. The mantra there was "74 or out the door". This meant that if you did not maintain at least a 74 average, or if your average fell below 74 in consecutive semesters you'd be either washed out or compelled to repeat some or all of your classes. Darwininan. I did well, grading on to law review, Amjurring a couple of classes, having my law review article published and graduating in the top 10% of my class.

I think stepping away from school for a couple of years made me appreciate the second chance at education. There probably is a school that will take a chance on you as long as you can show them something (relevant experience, an upward trend, good standardized score . .. something). YMMV.

I was in a similar situation prior to graduating and here is the advice I got. Once you have any grad school credit, other graduate schools will look more at your grad 'transfer' gpa instead of your undergraduate gpa. So take some graduate level courses as a non-degree seeking student, a transient, or on 'probation' at a smaller school and then use that grad gpa to apply to other grad schools.

Otherwise, if the rest of your resume is strong (good junior/senior gpa because most grad schools will look at that, research experience/awards, good recommendations) you may still be accepted.

I have a job with my Psyc BA. I'm a behavioral tutor for children with autism. I was also offered a job as a research assistant at a local hospital requiring the degree. I'll start grad level courses in July to get the assistant certification for my job, and then begin applying to masters programs sometime next year.

Hello sweetheart,

I just graduated Friday with a 3.14 GPA for a BA in psychology and I'm unsure with even that if I can make it to grad school. I right now have 6 months of experience at the Mental Health Association (there may be one near Hunter College - that's Downstate, right?). Back in high school I successfully began a suicide intervention program in my home town. I participated in research experience courses and did an independent study. But I didn't get called up every three minutes for an award. No summa, magna, or regular **** laude.

I say at least get your 3.0. A lot of graduate schools care much more about your psychology GPA than your overall GPA. Find out if your school does grade-replacement. Your worst courses you can take again and have the grade replaced. Take an extra semester or two of ALL easy classes. Do psychology club and be active in it. Psychology is an extremely competitive field because undergraduate courses in psychology are on the easy side.

And with a BA you can do a few things - teach, do some social work, prison jobs. It is best to get your 3.0 or more and go on to graduate school. Apply everywhere and be open to going to grad school outside of New York. If they want you they will find a way to make it work for you.

I hope this helps!

You could always do an online graduate program.  They seem to take just about anyone.

Yeah I would agree with doing other classes. I've known of students who their gpa gets lower from doing bad in a class they take some sort of elective they like to raise the gpa.  Like if you love singing or playing an instrument or art etc.  In a sociology class of mine two terms ago there was a girl who was an art major taking the class just because she was interested.  So maybe your adviser can help you take courses like that.

Original Post by leopardrayne:

Hello sweetheart,

I just graduated Friday with a 3.14 GPA for a BA in psychology and I'm unsure with even that if I can make it to grad school. I right now have 6 months of experience at the Mental Health Association (there may be one near Hunter College - that's Downstate, right?). Back in high school I successfully began a suicide intervention program in my home town. I participated in research experience courses and did an independent study. But I didn't get called up every three minutes for an award. No summa, magna, or regular **** laude.

I say at least get your 3.0. A lot of graduate schools care much more about your psychology GPA than your overall GPA. Find out if your school does grade-replacement. Your worst courses you can take again and have the grade replaced. Take an extra semester or two of ALL easy classes. Do psychology club and be active in it. Psychology is an extremely competitive field because undergraduate courses in psychology are on the easy side.

And with a BA you can do a few things - teach, do some social work, prison jobs. It is best to get your 3.0 or more and go on to graduate school. Apply everywhere and be open to going to grad school outside of New York. If they want you they will find a way to make it work for you.

I hope this helps!

 

Yep I'm getting a b.s. in criminal justice and my prof/adviser has told me that they mostly look at how you do in classes dealing with the major which is good for me because mostly I do just alright in other classes depending on what it is.

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