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Breastfeeding tell me exactly how many calories!!!


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I am breastfeeding my 3 month old. I plan to breastfeed for at least until she is 6 months but my original goal was the whole first year. I love breastfeeding her. The only down side is that I am not losing the extra 15 pounds of baby weight that everyone claimed would magically come off while breastfeeding. before I got pregnant I was eating 1200-1500 calories a day and I was seriously fine with that. I wish I could go back to counting but everyone says that when you are nursing you need to eat at least 2000 calories to keep up your milk supply. I want to go back to actually looking good and feeling good with my body but I'm terrified of losing my milk supply because I also really want to keep breastfeeding. How many calories can I eat to lose while nursing?

I'm 23 years old 5'4" and 130 pounds. before I had my baby I was 115 pounds, I want to get back to that. Please help me out.

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Well, there's no way to tell you exactly how many calories you need to eat. Everything's an estimate.

Is this your first child? Personally, I never went back to the weight I was after the birth of my first child (5'2" and 107 pounds) as I decided that was far too small. My body changed with my first pregnancy--my hips were wider mostly. I still looked great at 118 pounds so I wasn't worried about it.

Since you're already smack in the middle of a healthy weight range, it will be more difficult to lose weight, especially when your body is having to produce milk as well. Here's a calculator that will factor in the extra calories needed to produce breast milk:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/tools/calories- burned

And you were eating 1200-1500 calories to maintain? If so, that's far to few but that's beside the point. You need more calories than you think while nursing an infant (about 2,500 if you're lightly active with your stats using the calculator above). Remember that it took more than 3 months to gain the weight and you're off to a fantastic start!

Good luck!

No I was eating 1300-1500 to lose weight. After I reached 115 to maintain that weight calorie count told me I should eat like 1565. Anyway. No this is actually my second baby. I didn't breastfeed my first but because I counted my calories I lost all the baby weight from my last baby plus some. But I wasn't breastfeeding my first. I haven't been counting since I have been pregnant with my second because I don't see any point if I already need to eat 2000 to nurse. But right now I am pretty much maintaining 130-132 pounds. It bothers me that I am not losing because I know that if I wasn't breastfeeding I would already be close to my pre-baby weight by now. But I really want to continue breastfeeding without ruining my supply.  It's probably a lost cause until after I stop breastfeeding. I am just not comfortable with my weight right now and it's been bothering me. I hate not doing anything about it.

This is the first thread I have responded to, but I feel like I should since I was in your boat not too long ago  (my daughter is 12 months now).  When my daughter was six months old, I was at my heaviest of 139 (also 5 "4 and pre-pregnancy weight of 130).  After doing a lot of reading online, I felt like it was fine and healthy (as many sites and doctors say), that I could start eating about 1650 calories and not have it affect my milk supply.  I ate about 1650 calories every day (never going less than 1600), and I was completely healthy and had a good, healthy milk supply (keep in mind my baby was on solids as well at that point, but still breastfeeding quite a bit too).  However----PLEASE take this information with a grain of salt.  I know everyone and every body is different.  Some women surely cannot go less than 2000 calories, but many can.  I dropped lots of weight (at a healthy rate), and am at my lowest adult weight of 112-116.  I am not a doctor, and I suggest you keep looking at advice online from multiple sites.  But you could try dropping your calories a bit if you like (maybe to 1800 or 1700), and see if it affects milk supply.  But you obviously are at a great weight (especially for 3 months after your second kid!!!), and don't feel like you need to fit back into your same size anytime soon.  When your baby goes to solids in a few months, I am sure you could cut back then too.  I was ravishingly hungry in the first several months, and I don't think you should ignore any signs from your body.  Listen to your own body signals.  You may be fine going to a few less calories (if you like).  Hope that helps!

Here is one site that recommends that you can eat between 1500-1800 (while breastfeeding).  Never less, and I would think since you are still breastfeeding exclusively you should definitely be on the high end of that--maybe 1800?

 

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/mom/mom-wei ghtloss.html

My reccomendation (from one who has breastfed two) is that if you are active, healthfully eating and are informing your doctor of your plans to "diet" you should be okay with no less than 1700-1800. I only lost ten pounds for the first two years after my oldest was born :( But, I also didn't care what I ate and I ate as much of it as I chose. With my son, who was a preemie, I did count calories and breastfed. I lost 40 pounds (and got smaller than I was before becoming pg with my oldest). I stayed around 1700 calories, but I was also working again as a waitress and I still did not deny myself anything.

In order to keep my milk supply up (totally unrelated to the calorie counting) I had to pump. So, if you find you are starting to lose some milk you might want to try pumping as well. If you have fair amount of fat on your body then you should be okay as long as you dont go too much lower than 1700 cals.

Good luck to you! And please talk to your doctor to see if there are any contraindications for you and your little one.

Original Post by thelwat:

Here is one site that recommends that you can eat between 1500-1800 (while breastfeeding).  Never less, and I would think since you are still breastfeeding exclusively you should definitely be on the high end of that--maybe 1800?

 

http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/mom/mom-wei ghtloss.html

I hate to be nit picky but directly quoting from the link you provided:

"While nursing, you should not consume less than 1500-1800 calories per day, and most women should stay at the high end of this range. Some mothers will require much more than this, but studies show that going below this number may put supply at risk."

It does not say that you should eat between 1500-1800 calories daily. It says you should eat no LESS than that and many mothers need to be at or much higher than the 1,800 number.

As it was said before, everyone is different. At 5'2" and 140 pounds post-pregnancy, my milk supply suffered when I restricted to 1,500 calories/day. The only way I was able to maintain my milk supply AND lose weight was to eat 2,000-2,100 calories per day and I wasn't even working out on a regular basis. I managed to be at my prepregnancy weight by about 4 months postpartum (after my second pregnancy).

The better way to create a deficit is probably with exercise instead of food. You know, don't eat fewer calories, move more. That way your body is getting the nutrients it needs to pass along to your daughter but you still have a deficit thanks to the exercise.

But, play around with your numbers. You can always drop a couple hundred calories for a while and see if it affects your milk supply. If it doesn't and you're still not losing weight, drop another hundred, etc.

By the way, if you know how much milk you're producing, a good estimate is 20 calories burned for every ounce of milk produced. As your baby gets older and starts eating solids, she won't need as much milk so you will be making less milk and burning fewer calories doing it. That's also a great time to cut your calories more.

Im having a similar concern right now too. my baby is 5 1/2 months old and I still have an extra 15lbs to lgo. (im 5'11'' 170) I know thats not much but it makes a big difference in my self esteem and what clothes fit - im either in my early pregnancy maternity clothes or my pre pregnancy "fat pants" . If that sounds a little mello dramatic please excuse, I was once on this website 3 years ago under a different handle recording my journey of being 265lbs and dropping over 100 lbs-  so being out of my target size is a big deal to me. Im really afraid to cut calories at all as Im constantly hungry but dont want to affect my milk supply at all. AND Im also exhausted so excersice sounds lovely but i dont have any extra energy for that.

Original Post by fierdancer33:

Im having a similar concern right now too. my baby is 5 1/2 months old and I still have an extra 15lbs to lgo. (im 5'11'' 170) I know thats not much but it makes a big difference in my self esteem and what clothes fit - im either in my early pregnancy maternity clothes or my pre pregnancy "fat pants" . If that sounds a little mello dramatic please excuse, I was once on this website 3 years ago under a different handle recording my journey of being 265lbs and dropping over 100 lbs-  so being out of my target size is a big deal to me. Im really afraid to cut calories at all as Im constantly hungry but dont want to affect my milk supply at all. AND Im also exhausted so excersice sounds lovely but i dont have any extra energy for that.

You will be successful in getting the remaining weight off.  Youve done it before and you will do it again.  remember the reason for the weight gain was to nourish your baby and you are on track with weight loss.  As for exercise just try  to make a point to walk a fast walk everyday with baby in stroller.  Shoot for 45minutes at a rapid pace.  you will get there just take care  of yourself and your bundle of joy.

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