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Metal Taste from Soup Pot


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Hello All,


Well I wasn't sure where else to ask this or to find an answer so figured I would try here.

I have this soup pot that I use all the time and have had a year and a half now, but in the  most recent batch of soup I made ended up with this metallic taste and I had to throw it out.  So I guess my question is what could cause it to have this taste?  My only guess is the pot, but what would make it start to have this taste now and not the previous times?  Is it from overcooking or cooking to long?  And does this mean the pot has reached the end of its usefullness and I will need a new one now, or do you think it is a one time thing and it will be ok to use again? 


I have never had anything like this happen before so any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

17 Replies (last)

What is the pot made of?  If it's not stainless steel or enameled, then the metal might be reacting to any acidic ingredients (such as tomatoes) in the soup.  Aluminum pots are especially susceptible.  I don't know about pots with anodized or non stick surfaces though.

I use an enameled soup pot that I've had for years. 

Those were my first thoughts as well. An aluminum pan can definitely react with acidic ingredients and give off a metalic taste. If the pan is anodized or non-stick, maybe the coating is wearing thin. You've only had the pot for 1 1/2 years so if this is the case, then you have a bum pan.

I'd give the pot another try, maybe with a smaller batch of something that is definitlely non-acidic such as chicken noodle soup and see what happens.

Which soup caused the taste?

Thanks for the ideas!


I am not entirely sure what kind of pot it is, but its not alluminum (to heavy) so i think its a steel of some kind.  It might be anodized though.  Also, the soup I was making was not acidic, it was a simple chicken vegetable soup (whole roasting chicken, carrots, onions, celery, frozen spinach, lima beans, corn, green beans) but did not put any tomatoes in this batch.  Also, I noticed the broth got this grayish tint to it which I had also never seen before which I presume was from the pot as well.  After washing it though I didn't notice any places it seemed worn down or anything like that so I dunno. 


Perhaps the best bet would be to just try again and see if it happens, and if it does move on to a new pot.  Its a shame though, these pots aren't cheap. 

Original Post by obigmcveyo:

Thanks for the ideas!


I am not entirely sure what kind of pot it is, but its not alluminum (to heavy) so i think its a steel of some kind.  It might be anodized though.  Also, the soup I was making was not acidic, it was a simple chicken vegetable soup (whole roasting chicken, carrots, onions, celery, frozen spinach, lima beans, corn, green beans) but did not put any tomatoes in this batch.  Also, I noticed the broth got this grayish tint to it which I had also never seen before which I presume was from the pot as well.  After washing it though I didn't notice any places it seemed worn down or anything like that so I dunno. 


Perhaps the best bet would be to just try again and see if it happens, and if it does move on to a new pot.  Its a shame though, these pots aren't cheap. 

 Your description of the pan makes it sound like a cast iron pot.  If that is the case, then you should definitely not be making soup in it.  However, if my take is wrong, then it may be something else. 

Soup pots are not terribly expensive these days - you can get a decent 4 quart stainless steel soup pot for $40.   

Good luck!  Sorry that you had to throw away the soup!

 

There are cast alluminum pots which are very heavy.

If you do buy a new soup pan, buy a stainless steel one with a thick bottom, a least a 1/4"thick.  They last forever.

A cast iron pot would be black and obviously cast iron. There's no mistaking them. There are some very heavy anondized aluminum pots. Aluminum conducts heat very well so many pots are aluminum. A lot of them have aluminum bottoms.

The grayish tint to the broth makes me very suspicious. I've seen this in foods exposed to aluminum or tin cans. Did you use any canned veggies or broth?

Take a look at your pot and see if you see a brand name and then look that name up on the internet to determine what it's made from. If another batch of soup comes out this way from this pot perhaps you can contact the manufacturer, explain you've only had the pot 1 1/2 years and they'll offer a reduced price replacement. If it's a good pot, they might.

Well it isn't black, but it could be alluminum I suppose.  My friend has an alluminum and it is much lighter than mine so thought all alluminum ones would be like that.  And its a 12 qt one so I tend to make a lot of soup in it.  And all the veggies I used were either fresh or frozen, so yea the coloring of it really through me off as well.  I did let it simmer a little longer and on a little higher heat than usual so i thought that may have something to do with it, but wasn't sure. 

I will definitely have to look into it though, but from I remember there isn't a name on the pot at all.  So I may have to just go and find myself a good stainless steel one. 


Does anyone have a particular brand they like or think is of particularly good quality?  Thanks again for everyones input, I figured someone here would have the answer since you guys always do :)

I have a stainless steel soup pot by Tools of the Trade.   I believe this is first time I have used it, but I was stunned by the metallic taste when I made banana pudding in it (milk, bananas, sugar, cornstarch).  Fortunately, only the pudding adhering to the sides tasted bad.

It was a gift from a year ago, I believe.  I have never had this experience before with any cookware.  Turns out to be not so "stainless" either.  Some water splashing onto the inside appears dark, so I presume it is rust.

Does a stainless steel/aluminum pot need any special care?  Macy's website said I could use metal utensils and clean with a dishwasher.

Any ideas?  Can this be remedied or should just dump it?

I clean my pots with dish detergent and a sponge.  I use a plastic scrubbie to get off anything that's stuck.  You can get a nice shine by polishing with a baking soda paste and rinsing well.

If the pot is discolored, then it's not stainless steel.  In my opinion, I wouldn't keep it.  I have so little space there's no room for pots that don't earn their keep.  For soup and anything else that cooks for along time, I like enameled pots.  These can be heavy because often they are cast iron with an enamel coating, like La Crueset.  The heaviness keeps the heat even for long slow cooking, and the enamel is very clean and doesn't impart flavors.

I love this pot and have it in cobalt blue.

Sometimes you're supposed to cure new pots & pans before you use them. You may also have to cure them after washing in a dishwasher.

To cure, you heat the pot on the stove while it is empty. Then you take a small amount of oil and rub it around the inside of the hot pot with a papertowel. Small amount is just a few drops.

You must do this with plain cast iron pots after washing to prevent rust. I've had a couple of pans I was supposed to cure if I placed in dishwasher.

Original Post by christinavt:

I have a stainless steel soup pot by Tools of the Trade.   I believe this is first time I have used it, but I was stunned by the metallic taste when I made banana pudding in it (milk, bananas, sugar, cornstarch).  Fortunately, only the pudding adhering to the sides tasted bad.

It was a gift from a year ago, I believe.  I have never had this experience before with any cookware.  Turns out to be not so "stainless" either.  Some water splashing onto the inside appears dark, so I presume it is rust.

Does a stainless steel/aluminum pot need any special care?  Macy's website said I could use metal utensils and clean with a dishwasher.

Any ideas?  Can this be remedied or should just dump it?

 Rust would be redish. Some pans will turn darker after a few uses. Try curing it as I described above. I don't like putting pans in the dishwasher because the dishwasher soap is much harsher than regular dish soap and it can affect certain finishes.

Is it your spoon?

Is it possible that any of your ingrediants were bad?  I've had chicken that is a little old and tasted metallic before.

Or

Maybe boil water in the empty (clean) pot for a while, and see if the water tastes like metal, it may just be that whatever coating it came with has worn off and you need a new pot.

Original Post by obigmcveyo:

Does anyone have a particular brand they like or think is of particularly good quality?  Thanks again for everyones input, I figured someone here would have the answer since you guys always do :)

 Well, I love Le Creuset stuff, including their dutch ovens (I actually prefer them to stock pots), but they are very pricy :(

Thanks for all the suggestions!  Well I use one of those black hard plastic type spoons because I have a lot of non-stick stuff so I don't have very many metal utensil (in fact only my grilling stuff is metal). 

I did do the just boil water test and let it boil for a couple of hours and it actually seemed to turn out alright, and didn't appear to have any of the greyish color or metalic smell to it like the soup did, so there may be hope yet!  I suppose it could have been the chicken since it was frozen for a while before I used it.  Why would chicken take on a metalic taste?  I plan on trying to make up a small batch of soup some time next week and seeing if the same thing happens.  If not I will deffinitely look into some other pots.  The reason I like this one is because its big (12 or 14qt i think) and lets me make a lot for when family or friends come to visit. 


Thanks again for all the suggestions!

 I suppose it could have been the chicken since it was frozen for a while before I used it.  Why would chicken take on a metalic taste? 

Was it frozen in foil? If so, that could be the reason.

Original Post by obigmcveyo:

I suppose it could have been the chicken since it was frozen for a while before I used it.  Why would chicken take on a metalic taste?  

That's interesting.  I always freeze chicken, sometimes for months, and it never has a metallic taste.  Hmmm. 

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