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Recipes for a Broken Jaw


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My Rugby-playing teenage son just broke his jaw.  Amongst his other complications is the fact that for the next month he's not allowed, or indeed able, to chew his food.

So what the heck can I serve him?  He's bound to get tired of soup and mashed potato.

A few ideas I've come up with:

Mashed veggies (sweet potato, turnip, carrot, etc)

couscous

refried beans

And the aforementioned soup and mashed potatoes.

I can pour all kinds of sauces over his foods.  I can flavor the couscous.  I can mash things up.  But putting, for example, a salad in a blender is probably not the way to go.  

About the only real meals I've been able to come up with (other than soup) is meatballs and gravy mashed into mashed potato, and a refried beans, sour cream, guacamole and melted cheese "mexican casserole"

Of course there’s all kinds of desserts that are still available to him.  Ice cream, milkshakes, smoothies, pudding, jello, crème brulee, etc.  I’m just having trouble thinking up meals that can be eaten without chewing and also would be palatable to both him and my other two teenage sons, whose jaws are still unbroken.

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He can probably eat anything as long as it's cut up into small enough pieces that he doesn't need to chew the food.

 

Other than that sounds like an awful month for him.

Right now it's oatmeal, cream of wheat, or a "milkshake" for breakfast.  Lunch, since he has to bring it to school, is pretty much anything you can throw in a thermos.  Usually soup or a blenderized stew.  Scrambled eggs with mashed bologna is another possibility.

He's missing pasta, but I can't seem to think up a way to make it edible for him without throwing it in a blender, which makes it completely unpalatable.  Perhaps orzo?

Just for clarification, his mouth isn't wired shut, so it doesn't have to fit through a straw.  He just can't chew anything.

I just cooked some beef stew in the slow cooker. At the bottom were all kinds of tiny little pieces of stew meat and broth. You could probably slow cook some roast or stew beef with onion, salt, pepper and garlic until it's falling apart tender. Then put in blender or food processer to get rid of the chunks. Thicken the broth/meat combo with a bit of corn starch. You could then have a meatier gravy over the mashed potatoes.

Does he like potato soup. You could blend it so it doesn't have chunks. They make a variety of pastas that are very small.

Ouch! If he's missing pasta- what about orzo? It's small enough that you don't need to chew it and you can make it with any sauce and even put little mini meatballs in there. I recently made butternut squash soup in my crock pot and it was amazing! recipe was on the food network website.
I work in an ent departement where we have broken jaws and other issues that makes it impossible for the patients to chew, all the time. We get pureed food from the hospital kitchen, but thats usually just blended food with eggwhites or thickning agents. Most food can be put in a blendet and ecen though it takes some motivation to enjoy the texture, its not so bad. Mashed potatoes is a very good option for carbs. Make sure to blend in butter, milk or cream for extra cals in most things, because lots of people lose a considerable amouny of weight when they can only have soft food.

Porridges of different kinds, they can probably also be brought to school and blended out with a couple of tbls with milk and microwaved (they should have that available for him there).

Soups are great, and can be added most things.

Also, energy rich drinks are a good thing to make sure he gets enough cals.

Its going to be a hard this month, but it will be great when its over.

Please forgive any spelling errors, im on a phone and english is not my language:-)

Just in case someone else looks this up, here's a recipe that went down a treat last night.

 

Mexican Casserole

1.5 lb lean ground beef

Taco seasoning (or 3 parts paprika, 2 parts chili powder, 2 parts onion powder, 1 part garlic powder, and a bit of cumin)

1/4 cup water (or what the Taco seasoning calls for)

1 cup Guacamole

1 cup refried beans

1/2 cup light sour cream

1/2 cup herb and garlic flavored cream cheese dip

1/2 cup salsa (non-chunky, you may have to run it through the blender)

1 cup shredded nacho-flavored cheddar cheese.

refried beans (optional)

 

Brown the ground beef.  Drain the fat.  Add the taco seasoning and water.  Continue to cook until the water is absorbed.  Remove from heat and with a fork beat the ground beef until it is in very small pieces (small enough that it doesn't have to be chewed).

Pre-heat over to 350 F

Mix the sour cream and the cream cheese together.

In a loaf pan layer the ground beef, then the guacamole, then the cream cheese/sour cream mixture, then the salsa, then cover with cheese.

Bake in the oven for 30 min.

Serve with refried beans.  Alternately add the refried beans as a layer between the meat and the guacamole.

Makes enough for 6.  For those who can chew it can also be put in a taco shell or wrapped in a flour tortilla.

This was demolished by 2 adults and 3 hungry teenagers, one with a broken jaw.

He also really likes those small tins of flavored tuna, either on its own or mixed with couscous.

You can puree or grind up just about anything! I actually work in a clinic for children with feeding difficulties and we puree things I never thought could be pureed (ie. PBJ sandwiches, frozen burgers, chicken nuggets/breast, chef boyardee ravioli, hot dogs french fries, rice, etc). I'm not saying any of it is appetizing, but if your son is hungry enough and not super picky, you could maybe puree/grind up some of his favorite foods. I know this is kind of weird and gross, but if a puree just sounds awful to him, you could grind the food up in a food processor and add some kind of liquid (like water to proteins, veggies and fruits, milk to starches). If you have any questions, just let me know. I can share some of our "recipes". LOL!

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