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So I am already beginning on planning for St. Paddy's day as it is my second favorite holiday.. only after Christmas. I want to go all out this year and try different traditional dishes that are healthy and low calorie which is hard since Irish food seems to be mostly huge servings of bacon and sasuage and bread.

Does anyone have great recipes for St. Patricks Day? Maybe some that involve cabbage or maybe just anything green?

Also does anyone have traditions they always do for this holiday? I'd love to hear about anything you do or anything you eat!

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How about a nice, bright green fresh pea soup?  I know it's maybe not traditional Irish fare, but it's so pretty.

Use frozen peas, thawed and cooked for just a minute.  Puree the peas with enough milk to make a soup.  Taste and season with salt and pepper, heat and serve,  and garnish with a swirl of low fat sour cream and a fresh mint leaf or sprig of parsley in each bowl as the finishing touch. 

i'm making cabbage, carrots and corned beef.  i just won't eat a ton of the corned beef:)

I loved these zucchini muffins!

My mom used to always make Cabbage and Beef. It was cabbage cooked with hamburger meat and apple cider vinegar.

Just so you know, the traditional Irish meal is Bacon (not corned beef!) & cabbage (and the cabbage has to be cooked in the bacon water) served with nice floury potatoes and veg (eg carrots & parsnips, turnip, etc)

 

Why not try Irish stew:

Serves 4 (divides in half or doubles easily)

Ingredients

1/2 kilo (250g) lamb, cut into 1 inch cubes
4 carrots, peeled and left whole
2 onions, sliced finely
Pearl barley - two handfuls
1 chicken or vegetable stock cube, made up in a pint of hot water
4 large potatoes, cut into 2 inch chunks
Salt and pepper


Directions

 

1. Sprinkle the lamb with salt and pepper.
2. Heat the oil, and fry the lamb until it is browned.
3. Take the lamb out onto a plate, and add the onions to the pan and fry until they are soft and translucent (add more oil if you need to, scraping up the bits off the bottom of the pan).
4. Put the lamb back in, with the rest of the ingredients except the potatoes.
5. Cook for half an hour, then add the potatoes. Top up with water if it needs it.
6. Cook until the potatoes and pearl barley are cooked and the meat is soft.
7. Serve in bowls with brown bread, sprinkled with chopped fresh parsley.

#6  
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Think before you indulge in corned beef and cabbage. Cabbage...good. Corned beef...bad. Corned beef has 3,629 mg of sodium ( 151% of daily value), 803 calories and 20.3 gm of saturated fat in a 3 ounce serving. It's like having a serving of high blood pressure and a serving of clogged arteries all in one!

Thats not how you make Irish stew.. you just bung it all in a pot and cook for a few hours... none of this frying the lamb lark before hand!! Us Irish are a simple bunch lol...  and most people wouldnt add barley.

On Paddys day we usually have Bacon and Cabbage with pots and veg maybe some parsley sauce or else a good aul Irish Breakfast... not exactly healthy but so worth it. Then thats followed by lots and lots of pints :) and maybe a bag of extra salty and vinegar chips o the way home from the pub!!!

 

You could also try coddle its similar to stew...

Carrot, parsnip, potato, onion, turnip, bacon bits and sausage..just just throw it all in the pot with water and seasoning and let cook for a few hours the potatoes break down and make it nice and thick like a stew .. my nanny makes the best coddle ever!!

Cabbage and potato cakes with bacon bits is a yummy irish lunch (we call it bubble and squeak lol)

 

Original Post by johamilton:

Think before you indulge in corned beef and cabbage. Cabbage...good. Corned beef...bad. Corned beef has 3,629 mg of sodium ( 151% of daily value), 803 calories and 20.3 gm of saturated fat in a 3 ounce serving. It's like having a serving of high blood pressure and a serving of clogged arteries all in one!

I think.

I think that eating it one day a year isn't going to kill me.

 

PS - I just noticed you got your info completely wrong.  You're listing the stats for 320 grams.  A 3oz serving is 213 cals, 5.4g sat fat and 964mg sodium.  Not great for sure, but not at all what you're saying.

http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-beef-c ured-corned-brisket-cooked-i13347?size=2

 

Original Post by entersandlady:

Just so you know, the traditional Irish meal is Bacon (not corned beef!) & cabbage (and the cabbage has to be cooked in the bacon water) served with nice floury potatoes and veg (eg carrots & parsnips, turnip, etc)

 

 The Traditional Irish Dinner is Bacon, Similar to Canadian Bacon. BUT The Traditional Irish American Dinner is Corned Beef, Cabbage And  Potatoes. When Imigrants came to America They tried to Find something to their traditional Irish Dinner, and it was Corned Beef. Corned beef once a year is not going to Kill you.

Note: Why is everyone posting on a thread from a year ago? Who dug this up?

johamilton
Mar 12 2010 09:20
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Send message #6  
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Think before you indulge in corned beef and cabbage. Cabbage...good. Corned beef...bad. Corned beef has 3,629 mg of sodium ( 151% of daily value), 803 calories and 20.3 gm of saturated fat in a 3 ounce serving. It's like having a serving of high blood pressure and a serving of clogged arteries all in one!

WHAT???? I'm looking right now at my Cook's Corned Beef package and it's  160 calories for 4 oz.  10 g fat, 4 sat. fat and 1100mg sodium---yes the sodium is high but the other stats are not bad at all.  I do believe that St. Patty's day is once a year!  Enjoy!!  I know I will!!

you are right. I didn't click on the 3 oz. portion. a 3 oz. portion of corned beef brisket  has 213 cal. 5.4 gm. of sat fat, 83 mg  cholesterol and 964 mg sodium. (40% of daily value).  That was enough to keep me from buying one at the grocer. I guess if you have no blood pressure problems and have a healthy cholesterol level it might be worth it to enjoy this treat.

I've been enjoying baking Irish soda bread with buttermilk and raisins.

The recipe I use is* not * the healthiest (I;ve tried others but without the butter it just doesn;t make it for me!)

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Amazingly-Easy-I rish-Soda-Bread/Detail.aspx

 

It;s once a year, a *slice* of soda bread and *some* corned beef and cabbage is not going to destroy all your other good choices.

 

This is another recipe I'm trying to use up my leftover buttermilkSmile

 

http://homecooking.about.com/od/breadrecipes/ r/blbread89.htm

One thing I like about CC is that I can plan for special days and not feel guilty about them. My old pattern was to try to not eat treats at all, feel deprived and then binge out!

 

Laura

Have fun everyone!

#13  
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I am sorry...I just want to know HOW anyone can say St Paddy's is the next favorite holiday beside Christmas.   Over Thanksgiving.....Over New Year's or Easter or 4 of July.  

Here's an idea that I made for lunch today:

Steam chopped green cabbage and cook some green peas. Toss them together with a little butter and salt, pepper, dill, majoram, or your other favorite spices!

It was a little different, but good!

I am so looking forward to St. Patrick's Day. I had no idea my city even had a parade. My husband has already asked me to make corned beef and cabbage before we go out to have drinks. 

Salmon. My Father was born on the north western coast of Ireland in County Donegal, the area is known as the Bloody Foreland due to the heavy Kelp beds right off shore.  They ate a lot of fish when I visited.

Original Post by jrap30:

I am sorry...I just want to know HOW anyone can say St Paddy's is the next favorite holiday beside Christmas.   Over Thanksgiving.....Over New Year's or Easter or 4 of July.  

To Some people just like St Patrick's day better. Since I am Irish American I appreciate the Holiday not for the drinking and such, but reflecting on my heritage. I think it would be my 3rd favorite Holiday after Christmas and Easter.

You can easily burn off excess calories  by jigging to Clancy Brothers songs or Silly Wizard or The Chieftains.  I buy sliced deli corned beef instead of boiling fatty chunks of beef and make rye and sourcraut sandwiches.   

Curry Fries and Guiness! Magners for desert.

Seriously a lot of people boil the corned beef first and drain off the salt before putting it into the boiled dinner.  No dietician told'em to do it, they just do it.  Also as some have already found read the corned beef labels...here in the north east at least you can find leaner briskets..they are not created equal.

Erin go Bragh!

hi my names Daniel im just thinking something that we eat in my Family is Haystakes and soda bread soda im

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