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I can't get a job


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So for those of you that don't know. I went to a job interview a week ago. I thought it went really well. At the end of the interview they said they'd call me back. And... no call back. Now on to new stuff.

I went for an interview yesterday morning. At the end she wanted to move forward. I did an online assessment and filled in an application. She seemed really interested in me. Late yesterday afternoon I noticed she had just reposted the job on craigslist. I am not anticipating a call back now.

I'm now thinking that my ex-employer may be talking crap about me. My employment there was great until the last month when we started having issues. After I left, I thought we had worked it out. We had a long talk about what happened. I visited them a couple months later and my supervisor was saying she wanted me to come back.

So, is it appropriate to ask the interviewer why they didn't hire me? If it turns out this former employer is prohibiting me from getting a job, what should/can I do about it?

29 Replies (last)

I don't know the answers to your questions, but are you providing your former employer as a reference?

I think it is perfectly appropriate to ask an interviewer for feedback. However, I would not question the information about your last job if it doesn't come up.

If the last job is, in fact, the reason you are not being hired I would try to get some other references. Point them out in your interviews so that the interviewer has the opportunity to speak with someone who has a positive view of your work. Also, you could explain during the interview what happened at your last job and what you learned from it and how you might handle it better in the future.

good luck.

I don't see the harm on asking why you were not selected

You always have the right to list your former employer but ask them to not contact them, also most states have a rule that when a potential employer checks a reference the previous employer is only allowed to provide that you were employed by them and what your dates of employment were .

 

Good luck on your job hunt

What is unemployment like in your area? If it's high, it's probably not your former employer, it's probably a dearth of jobs.

The places that aren't calling you back...are you calling them back?  Sometimes showing extra interest post-interview is just the kick they need to hire you.  Invest in each interview...this includes follow-up on your part.

#7  
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My references are people I have worked with that I have no doubt would speak well of me. I know on both applications they asked for the phone number of former employers. And the only thing I could think of is that the interviewer called my last place of employment.

I will ask the interviewer. Thanks guys!!

 

ETA: Kathy, with the first job there was lots of people there for an interview so I didn't think anything of it. The one yesterday though was very different. It's only part time and she mentioned they were having a hard time filling the position.

Oh, and I did call back and send a friendly email to the first interviewer. :)

I would not blame your former employer; at least yet. You've only been on 2 interviews, and in this market that's like none at all.

You might want to brush up on interview skills, update job skills, check your body language during the interview and how you're presenting yourself.

I don't think former employers can give much information beyond so and so was an employee and worked for us between these dates.

I wouldn't put to not contact your former employer either; that sends up a big red flag right there. It's like you have something to hide.

Good luck, the more interviews you go on the better you'll get. It's tough out there right now.

2nd clg1 x 100.

Also: please try not to take any of it personally. Definitely absorb information about your interviewing style, definitely work to get the job. But feeling you've made a connection with an interviewer is no guarantee of anything. You just don't know what's going in a hiring manager's head, or in the back room, and can't guess... improve what you can about your presentation and carry on.

What Wilson put is true. A previous employer is only allowed to give dates of employment. The former employer can be sued if they give any other info.

It's appropriate if you ask for the feedback correctly. I.E. not "why didn't you hire me?" (not that you were planning on saying it that way) But, what is appropriate is saying something along the lines of "I appreciate the opportunity to interview with you, and I would appreciate any constructive criticism you could provide me about my interview and experience. I appreciate your time." This is a completely normal practice and could help you get valuable information on what your weaknesses might be.

 

BTW: I am currently unemployed and searching so I feel your pain. It's awful! I left a job to move to a new state with zero anticipation that months later I would still be unemployed. I mistakenly thought my successful career history and recent masters degree would make me very marketable. I was wrong and I am struggling financially. Very stressful!!

also looking. not a freaking easy time, at all.

However, OP, childcare is in demand; you're pretty flexible in terms of acceptable salary; you've got luck on your side.

@strangefire - if you've just finished a masters, consider an internship, if you can manage.

Original Post by janelovesjam:

also looking. not a freaking easy time, at all.

However, OP, childcare is in demand; you're pretty flexible in terms of acceptable salary; you've got luck on your side.

@strangefire - if you've just finished a masters, consider an internship, if you can manage.

Thanks for the advice! It's hard because I got masters late in life/career so I have many years of work behind me and my last full time position before going back to school was as a 10 state regional director. During school I taught oral communication at the university and had several internships. One of which turned into the job I left to move. (moved to be near dying relative) I am not proud though! I am taking babysitting jobs, hourly jobs doing odd tasks at local bed & breakfasts, tutoring, pet sitting...whatever...I just need to make a living before I completely blow through all my savings! I would love to get a job anywhere near the level I left off; however, it's just not happening. Unfortunately, many jobs I apply for give me the "overqualified" rejection. OMG, I need to work! I do communication consulting but not near enough to live on. I use to make 85K/year and now I can't get a steady, full-time $10/hour gig. And I have excellent references. Sorry I am ranting now. It's just hard b/c I have such a strong work ethic and have always been successful as a result and now I feel like such a loser. It's a very emotional situation.

#14  
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Original Post by strangefire1:

Original Post by janelovesjam:

also looking. not a freaking easy time, at all.

However, OP, childcare is in demand; you're pretty flexible in terms of acceptable salary; you've got luck on your side.

@strangefire - if you've just finished a masters, consider an internship, if you can manage.

Thanks for the advice! It's hard because I got masters late in life/career so I have many years of work behind me and my last full time position before going back to school was as a 10 state regional director. During school I taught oral communication at the university and had several internships. One of which turned into the job I left to move. (moved to be near dying relative) I am not proud though! I am taking babysitting jobs, hourly jobs doing odd tasks at local bed & breakfasts, tutoring, pet sitting...whatever...I just need to make a living before I completely blow through all my savings! I would love to get a job anywhere near the level I left off; however, it's just not happening. Unfortunately, many jobs I apply for give me the "overqualified" rejection. OMG, I need to work! I do communication consulting but not near enough to live on. I use to make 85K/year and now I can't get a steady, full-time $10/hour gig. And I have excellent references. Sorry I am ranting now. It's just hard b/c I have such a strong work ethic and have always been successful as a result and now I feel like such a loser. It's a very emotional situation.

I got an email rejection today for setting tables at a banquet center. I don't look like the type of person who can set tables? I would take ANY job. I have applied for any job I might have the qualifications for. I'd clean up poo if I could get paid for it. I have no shame.  

I think you and I are in the same boat! Poo cleaners unite!

.

here's what i think for you guys, though... apols if you've already tried these (i know how annoying advice like this is)

@strangefire: headhunters & boutique temp agencies (some specialize in 'creative staffing' for marketing & comms jobs)

@luvs2eat: entrepreneurship, like i suggested in your other thread, via exploitation of friends & everyone you know

survival: office temping, p/t retail. waitressing at a decent restaurant is actually hard to get into :/ but franchises (eg sports bars) are more open.

eta: strangefire - drop the MA & some of your other accomplishments from your survival job resume. play up customer service aspects (spin them if you must) of your previous jobs. 

#18  
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Thanks Jane. I was thinking that I hadn't gone to any staffing places yet. Thanks for reminding me.

I emailed the first interviewer this morning does anybody want to start a pool on how long/if ever she gets back to me?

Thanks Jane. Great advice. I too struggle with some pretty dark thoughts around this. Your advice and support is greatly appreciated. :-)

It's illegal for a former employer to give a bad review.  I have worked in human resources and it's the same everywhere I have ever worked, we can give the dates that the person was employed with the company and nothing more.  Nothing good and nothing bad. 

29 Replies (last)
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