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Homeschooling... Pro or no?


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Just curious on everyone's opinions.

Personally, I think it really depends on the parents and how well they can teach their child. The parent must be able to balance being a teacher and parent if they want their child to succeed. Its extremely easy for the parent to become too strict- too much of a teacher- so the child obeys and is hesitant to speak up about personal issues. On the other hand, its also easy for the parent to become too much of a best friend with the child to the point the child doesn't learn anything. Either case often leads to social isolation... its up to the parent to make sure the child has social outlets and "real world" experience. 

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I'm a school teacher so of course I dont' support homeschooling. We have homeschooled kids come to our schools to take the end of year tests required by the state. Most of the kids I've met that are home schooedl are lacking in social skills. There are communities groups that offer homeschooing and social outlets for the kids, it depends on how much you put into to it. Following a  schedule and knowing what you need to teach. The school district where I live helps with this, I dont' know how it works since I'm not involved in it.

Anyone that I've had an interaction with that's been home schooled is a little bit socially retarded. They seem to lack basic social skills that most kids develop in elementary school.

I'm not sure what type of an education someone has to have to home school their kids, but I hope it's more than just a high school education. If a teacher has to go to school for at least 4 years and then do some sort of in class training, why should a parent with no real training be able to teach their kids at home?

I just think it's wrong to keep your kids out of public school because of your personal fears or out of a desire to have complete control over your children. I don't think that parents usually home school their kids to benefit their children, they usually do it because they're getting something out of it or it makes them feel better. They should be looking out for the best interests of their children.

If a child is home schooled, they should be in many different programs with many kids their age-kids of different religions, different races and backgrounds, different interests, etc. They need to be exposed to all types of people that they'll have to interact with as adults.

I was "home schooled" for a few years. I can say that I did much better in a traditional public school setting.

My mom was really lazy. I don't even know why she wanted to home school us. We had no formal lesson plans or curriculum and there were lots of days that we had no learning time at all. I actually never learned to do fractions. I was being "home schooled" during the grade that everyone else was learning fractions, and my mom didn't teach me. When I got back into school, it was obvious to me that I was supposed to know and I was too embarrassed to admit I didn't. So I faked fractions from about sixth grade to graduation

Its a lot of work for the parent or home tutor. And I think it does deprive the kids of needed social interaction. But I know it works for some people.

7 of the 9 home-schooled kids I personally knew were very well educated, had good manner, and had very polished and graceful social skills. The other two were OK and yes they were a bit awkward socially. They grew out of it once they attended college. All in all they were a good bunch of kids from 3 separate families that I know.

Home-schooling requires strong committment from competent parents. I considered it but changed my mind. As it was I already spent at least 2 hrs/day after school with my kids. I could not have spent enough time to home-school my kids.

I support a parent's right to home school their child 100%.

I think, that if done right, home schooling is way better...less distractions, more one to one.

Original Post by cajunrider:

7 of the 9 home-schooled kids I personally knew were very well educated, had good manner, and had very polished and graceful social skills. The other two were OK and yes they were a bit awkward socially. They grew out of it once they attended college. All in all they were a good bunch of kids from 3 separate families that I know.

Home-schooling requires strong committment from competent parents. I considered it but changed my mind. As it was I already spent at least 2 hrs/day after school with my kids. I could not have spent enough time to home-school my kids.

I was homeschooled for a few years.

When I went back to public school (high school) I was, academically, way ahead of all my peers. Homework and tests were no problem. Dressing (I didn't dress sloppy... but very clean and casual) and on a visual basis, I fit in with all my classmates as well. My parents had drilled me to be a perfect little girl.

I wasn't awkward in the sense that I spoke funny or didn't know how to make eye contact... I just didn't know what to say with my peers. I couldn't hold a "non-professional" conversation or let myself have fun. I still can't. Personally, I couldn't see myself homeschooling my kids (if I ever have any) just because I don't think I could do a good job, at least not by myself. Maybe if my husband helped but definitely could not do it alone. 

Just curious to what everyone else thinks.  

I support a person's right to homeschool their children.

That said, I've felt sorry for every homeschooled person I've ever encountered. There was one girl in my speech class during my first year of college who cried NON-STOP because she missed her dad and couldn't believe that people were telling her that the things that her daddy told her weren't true (he was uber-religious). Literally, everytime I saw her, she was either crying or had just stopped crying. I don't think she could have functioned without her fiance (that her dad picked for her) being there to shelter her. Aside from that, she was a sweet girl.

I think there's a way to homeschool kids without making them an even easier target for the real world. Unfortunately, not every parent is able accomplish that.

No, I don't think it's such a good idea. There is a reason why a teacher specializes in their subject, and undergoes teaching classes on top of that. They also accumulate experience in how to teach.

I think a biology teacher should teach biology, but I wouldn't want to learn literature from them, even if they do take some time to read the manual. Not everyone is suited by temperament and ability to be a teacher either. And most likely you wouldn't know before doing it so why experiment on your kid.

I also thought school is a good thing to go through. Because all the difficulties you will face in school are simply going to be the issues you will deal with in the rest of your life. Interacting with people, competition, the bull that comes with popularity, gossip, bullying. Exactly because it's not such a nice experience is why I think it's why kids should go through it. Because they need the thicker skin once the parents can't protect them any better.

no

Original Post by suzushii:

No, I don't think it's such a good idea. There is a reason why a teacher specializes in their subject, and undergoes teaching classes on top of that. They also accumulate experience in how to teach.

I think a biology teacher should teach biology, but I wouldn't want to learn literature from them, even if they do take some time to read the manual. Not everyone is suited by temperament and ability to be a teacher either. And most likely you wouldn't know before doing it so why experiment on your kid.

I also thought school is a good thing to go through. Because all the difficulties you will face in school are simply going to be the issues you will deal with in the rest of your life. Interacting with people, competition, the bull that comes with popularity, gossip, bullying. Exactly because it's not such a nice experience is why I think it's why kids should go through it. Because they need the thicker skin once the parents can't protect them any better.

The bolded part was precisely the reason I sent my children to public schools, the part about the teachers not so much. Some of the teachers were great but there were few of them. The rest of them either lacked knowledge/skills or didn't put in the effort. I spent hours and hours with my children going over what the teachers missed and teaching my children to do their research and learn on their own.

Original Post by melodic:

Original Post by cajunrider:

7 of the 9 home-schooled kids I personally knew were very well educated, had good manner, and had very polished and graceful social skills. The other two were OK and yes they were a bit awkward socially. They grew out of it once they attended college. All in all they were a good bunch of kids from 3 separate families that I know.

Home-schooling requires strong committment from competent parents. I considered it but changed my mind. As it was I already spent at least 2 hrs/day after school with my kids. I could not have spent enough time to home-school my kids.

I was homeschooled for a few years.

When I went back to public school (high school) I was, academically, way ahead of all my peers. Homework and tests were no problem. Dressing (I didn't dress sloppy... but very clean and casual) and on a visual basis, I fit in with all my classmates as well. My parents had drilled me to be a perfect little girl.

I wasn't awkward in the sense that I spoke funny or didn't know how to make eye contact... I just didn't know what to say with my peers. I couldn't hold a "non-professional" conversation or let myself have fun. I still can't. Personally, I couldn't see myself homeschooling my kids (if I ever have any) just because I don't think I could do a good job, at least not by myself. Maybe if my husband helped but definitely could not do it alone. 

Just curious to what everyone else thinks.  

The bolded is the socially retarded part people spoke about. That part that you struggle with is a learned behavior during childhood that occurs with other children (who are also learning too). Now that you were older, you experience the awkwardness and the inability to let go that comes naturally for children.

I wasn't homeschooled but I had extremely overprotective parents, so as a result I missed out on social behavioral cues and stuff and I am exact way you are, although I've been getting better. You still learn this stuff as an adult, it's just harder.

Oh, and I am anti-homeschooling. I was bullied and raped and I still wouldn't have wanted to be homeschooled.

Public schools (or even private I'm assuming) prepare you for the environments you're gonna have to deal with for the rest of your life.

Original Post by cptbunny:

Original Post by melodic:

Original Post by cajunrider:

7 of the 9 home-schooled kids I personally knew were very well educated, had good manner, and had very polished and graceful social skills. The other two were OK and yes they were a bit awkward socially. They grew out of it once they attended college. All in all they were a good bunch of kids from 3 separate families that I know.

Home-schooling requires strong committment from competent parents. I considered it but changed my mind. As it was I already spent at least 2 hrs/day after school with my kids. I could not have spent enough time to home-school my kids.

I was homeschooled for a few years.

When I went back to public school (high school) I was, academically, way ahead of all my peers. Homework and tests were no problem. Dressing (I didn't dress sloppy... but very clean and casual) and on a visual basis, I fit in with all my classmates as well. My parents had drilled me to be a perfect little girl.

I wasn't awkward in the sense that I spoke funny or didn't know how to make eye contact... I just didn't know what to say with my peers. I couldn't hold a "non-professional" conversation or let myself have fun. I still can't. Personally, I couldn't see myself homeschooling my kids (if I ever have any) just because I don't think I could do a good job, at least not by myself. Maybe if my husband helped but definitely could not do it alone. 

Just curious to what everyone else thinks.  

The bolded is the socially retarded part people spoke about. That part that you struggle with is a learned behavior during childhood that occurs with other children (who are also learning too). Now that you were older, you experience the awkwardness and the inability to let go that comes naturally for children.

I wasn't homeschooled but I had extremely overprotective parents, so as a result I missed out on social behavioral cues and stuff and I am exact way you are, although I've been getting better. You still learn this stuff as an adult, it's just harder.

Oh, and I am anti-homeschooling. I was bullied and raped and I still wouldn't have wanted to be homeschooled.

Public schools (or even private I'm assuming) prepare you for the environments you're gonna have to deal with for the rest of your life.

I have the same problem.  I was neither sheltered nor home schooled.  People just like to blame it on the home schooling because it's easier.  Heck, many of my friends have the same problem, seem perfectly normal, have no idea how to have random conversations that serve no purpose, all went to public school, few of them were highly sheltered growing up.

On topic:  Home schooling gives kids a higher chance to succeed at studies and university.  It's also a lot of work that most people aren't capable of or willing to do appropriately.  You have to go out of your way to give your children plenty of time with other appropriate age children (preferably outside of your own family), and you have to make sure that you're still teaching the things on standardized tests in your state.  I'm all for home-schooling, when it is done right and not lazily.

There are socially inept people coming from public/private school educations.  There are socially inept people coming from homeschooled educations.  It is unfair to assume that either type of education will automatically produce an adult that is better equipped to handle life situations.

I support a parent's right to choose how to educate their own children.  I also believe that if a parent does not provide an education for their child/children, they are guilty of abuse/neglect.  There are, however, children that will go through an educational system and remain uneducated.  A child's chance to succeed in either system will be greatly enhanced by their parents' work and diligence.

I homeschool our 5 children.  The youngest is 3, and still learning his letters.  The oldest is in her Junior year and will be taking college credits her Senior year for dual credit towards her high school diploma.  She is in a homeschool program that offers assistance as needed, monitors progress, and will result in a diploma.  She did take a class in a public school last year, but was unimpressed with the social atmosphere.  She has also taken classes with an online high school- and loved the social atmosphere.  They did meet in person, as well as online.

My kids are all involved in a variety of sports, Scouts, Church, service, and 4-H activities.  They have taken various classes from other teachers throughout the years, and all have some decision making abilities in their yearly curriculum.  One is socially outgoing, one is uncomfortable in new situations, all are different.  Homeschooling has not shaped them- instead- they are allowed to shape their homeschooling.  They are pushed, sheltered, exposed to uncomfortable truths- as needed- because I can see their needs much more clearly than a teacher can with 40 students per class, with several classes per day.

I have met many successful kids from public/private schools, and many from homeschooling situations.  Generalizations are unfair.

Totally against homeschooling here. It's not legal in my country and I'm glad about it. I do understand that there are areas of wilderness where kids go to school online but I don't think it should be the parents decision what their child should or should not learn.

Unless they live on the moon, of course, plan to stay there and their children have no chance to ever leave.

Okay, I guess I'll chime in here.

I was homeschooled K-12. 

Academically, I fared just fine.  I got good SAT scores, was accepted into every university I applied to, and graduated from undergrad summa **** laude (**** = c - u - m.  Stupid CC censoring...)  I did not find it difficult to adjust to a classroom setting.

Socially... I admit I can be a bit socially retarded.  I think part of that is due to anxiety.  I am an introvert.  I just prefer to be alone rather than interact with people.  The hardest thing about college for me was group projects.  I don't really blame this on home schooling though, since my brother was home schooled too, and he seems perfectly "normal" (whatever normal means).

Sexually, I am very insecure.  I have never been on a date, and I'm 22.  I hate my boobs.  I don't want the sex appeal.  I think this is partly what contributed to my ED.  Again, I don't really blame this on home schooling though.  My younger brother has a girlfriend.  Most of my other formerly home schooled friends seem perfectly "normal" in this regard.

Psychologically... I have my "issues".  Eating disorders, OCD, anxiety, self-harm, etc.  My high anxiety/OCD has been present to some extent for as long as I can remember, although they were only diagnosed when I was 20 or so (because before then I didn't seek help).  But then again... a lot of us on here have "issues." 

I don't know how many of my problems were contributed by being home schooled.  Conversely, I don't know how many of them would have been made worse by not being home schooled.  I know many people with similar mental illnesses that were public schooled through high school.  And I know many home schooled people who turned out perfectly "normal."

That's just my personal experience.

NO. Talk about social-development stunning for LIFE. D:

I just looked up the qualifications a parent must have to home school their children in Washington state and it seems a bit ridiculous. 45 college credits, attend a parent qualifying course, and have a teacher check in with the child for about 1 hour per week. 45 college credits is only about 9 classes which could be completed at a community college in only 2-4 quarters. And it doesn't at all specify what type of classes they need to be.

And there are specific course areas that need to be focused on, but I'm under the impression that the course areas can be taught however the parent sees fit. I've just seen a few too many shows where parents are home schooling their kids and the books being used are titled things like "English for the Christian Student" or "Biology for the Christian Student." Watching the Duggar mother homeschooling her 19 children and teaching them that evolution is made up really just rubs me the wrong way. I'm sure that there are plenty of parents that are educated enough to provide their children with a good education so I don't want to make generalizations, but I'm sure that there are also many parents that home school their children and aren't well qualified enough to replace a public school education.

I guess I just don't understand why you would want to home school your children...perhaps if I lived in an area where the public schools were horrible and the private schools were too expensive maybe I'd have a different opinion. But if you live in an area that have decent public schools, why home school? To have more control over your kids? To prevent them from making mistakes?...I guess I just don't understand why you wouldn't want to expose your children to the real world.

Home schooling is really popular among Adventists, so I know a lot of home schooled kids and home schooling parents.

Despite my own negative experience, there are benefits. In a home school setting, a kid can get more individual attention and a more detailed lesson plan. Because they are not in a classroom where everyone has to move at a similar pace and learn the same material all together, there is a lot of flexibility.

Also, a lot of home schooling parents create lesson plans that allow their kids (students) to apply the material to real life and put it into practice. They can take the time to teach them a little further than what is on the pages of a textbook.

Also, there is the advantage of living with your teacher.

Here in our community, there is a home school group. One of it's main purposes is to provide opportunities for socialization for the kids. They go on field trips and outings and the parents help each other. Those families are very close knit.

I think it is a lot of work. And there has to be structure and discipline. But it isn't the worst idea ever. Kids have been learning at home for a long time. One particular kid comes to mind...he passed his GED with absolutely flying colors and is now playing piano all over the country.

I 100% support a person's right to teach their child. 

I know if we lived in an area where the schools are lacking (there seem to be so many schools like this!), I would consider home schooling for sure.  I want my child to succeed, and with some of the schools out there, it would be difficult.  My only concern would be the social aspect.  However, I know of many homeschooling programs in my part of our city that offer much social interaction. 

I say the big factor is making sure the parents are truly serious about homeschooling offering a creative yet structured environment conducive for learning. 

My daughter will be ready for school in the fall.  We live in an area that has more than decent schools, but are likely going the private school route.  We are considering homeschooling her as well.  Still haven't decided 100%. 

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