The Lounge
Moderators: spoiled_candy, nomoreexcuses, peaches0405, Mollybygolly


How to make a dog gain weight?


Quote  |  Reply

What can you add to a dog's food that is easy on the stomach and calorie dense (small in bulk but has lots of calories)? Also, it must be cheap.

When I volunteer at my animal shelter, I always see a few skinny dogs. People never want to adopt them. I have asked the staff there if they do anything to help the skinny dogs gain weight. They say that they try giving them more food, but they usually can't even stomach it.

I know there are dry foods that are higher in calories, but they are pretty expensive. Can you add something high in fat, like oil or peanut butter? Or will that be hard on their stomach?

I hope you all have ideas, because I would buy it and bring it in myself. I hate seeing this. :/

55 Replies (last)

Egg yolks!  And peanut butter is a great idea too.

Yes, the egg yolks are a definite win. When I baked and only required the whites I would always make our little one egg yolk scrambles. I don't know if you eat meat mutt, but another great one is skin. We roast whole chickens frequently, and when scruffy was dying (and significantly underweight), we would feed him the greasy chicken skins which would have otherwise been discarded.

Original Post by lysistrata:

Egg yolks!  And peanut butter is a great idea too.

Are there any foods that I have to worry about the dog having an allergic reaction to? And thanks! :)

Raw bones have a good amount of fat on them too, plus it gives the dog something to do in the enclosure.  You can usually get soup bones at the grocery store pretty inexpensively; they're like $1.50/pound.

what about a gravy made of flour and canned milk with a chicken bullion for flavor? Very Cheap and high in calories

That is if you are using a dry food.

Full fat hotdogs

Original Post by muttlover:

Original Post by lysistrata:

Egg yolks!  And peanut butter is a great idea too.

Are there any foods that I have to worry about the dog having an allergic reaction to? And thanks! :)

I found this from the tubes:

Several studies have shown that some ingredients are more likely to cause food allergies than others. In order of the most common offenders in dogs are beef, dairy products, chicken, lamb, fish, chicken eggs, corn, wheat, and soy.

Original Post by r4eboxer:

what about a gravy made of flour and canned milk with a chicken bullion for flavor? Very Cheap and high in calories

That is if you are using a dry food.

Yes! They love the gravies. You could also add rice or spuds to this (with plenty of gravy on top) - our dog also got "meaty taties" to help him along.

Original Post by cptbunny:

Full fat hotdogs

Dog eat dog Surprised

Seriously though mutt, I feel so bad for those babies. Good on you for helping them!

Thanks for all the ideas and info everyone. :)

I haven't talked to the staff about it yet, but I think they would be more leniant in letting me bring something in if it was made in a can or container - not home made. So I will ask if I can bring in (high calorie) canned gravies, peanut butter, raw bones, or hot dogs.

You can give the doggies raw egg over their dry food too.

Original Post by cptbunny:

You can give the doggies raw egg over their dry food too.

There's no risk of salmonella?

See, I have no idea what is okay and not okay for dogs to eat... Except for chocolate and coffee. :D

Rice, eggs and gravy would work fairly well.

I would think you'd know which dogs were having allergic reactions to wheat, eggs, etc. because most shelters are using fairly cheap food which contains these products. I understand why they have to, and I'm not complaining. They reserve the more expensive good food for dogs who truly can't digest the cheap stuff.

Original Post by muttlover:

Original Post by cptbunny:

You can give the doggies raw egg over their dry food too.

There's no risk of salmonella?

See, I have no idea what is okay and not okay for dogs to eat... Except for chocolate and coffee. :D

 There is actually very little risk of salmonella for people who eat raw eggs. It can and does happen. It usually happens to the immune suppressed and fragile, like small children and the elderly.

Original Post by cptbunny:

You can give the doggies raw egg over their dry food too.

when dog #1 got sick, eggs were the only thing she would go for.

Original Post by muttlover:

Thanks for all the ideas and info everyone. :)

I haven't talked to the staff about it yet, but I think they would be more leniant in letting me bring something in if it was made in a can or container - not home made. So I will ask if I can bring in (high calorie) canned gravies, peanut butter, raw bones, or hot dogs.

 I think the canned gravy is a great idea.  I worry about dogs getting too much extra salt from things like hot dogs but the canned gravy will have high soduim too so it is a trade off to getting them fattened up.  Tofu might be a good thing to add with the gravy for extra protein and easy on the stomach.  Would be great if you could find a store willing to donate a few cans etc. extra to the kennel on a monthly basis.  If you get the go ahead it might be worth the extra time.

Dogs can eat all kinds of stuff humans can't.  They can eat raw meat, eggs, heck even road kill (blech) without getting sick.  So I wouldn't worry about raw eggs.  Besides, even people frequently eat raw eggs - I have heard in order to get enough salmonella to get sick, you would have to eat like 20 raw eggs.  Not sure if that is true or not, as I am sure you could get one egg that had a lot in it, but on average most eggs aren't going to have that much.

#18  
Quote  |  Reply
Oil, corn oil, olive oil . Very calorie dense and will help skin and coat. Any kind of vegetable oil about a tablespoon over their food for each meal. I didn't read whole post but assume they have been checked for worms. Also fatty cooked hamburger and potatoes. You're a saint for taking care of furry critters. Good luck and God bless.

I would not recommend giving dogs gravy made with flour, my dog is allergic to gluten and it makes him very sick. We have to buy him special grain free dog food that has wild fish, sweet potatoes, veggies and seeds in it... he eats better then 99% of people do!

I can't see most dogs stomaching grains too well either since it is not a natural food (or healthy) for them.... and unless you have an evil plan that involves the employees cleaning up the kennels with a mop from digestive issues, i would stay away from feeding the dogs grain products.

I do know that most dog foods already have lots of gluten-this and corn starch-that in it... which i definitely do not agree with. But its probably best not to add even more starches to the diet.

Eggs and egg yolks are a great idea, fatty poultry and meat (and their drippings), salmon fat/skin, nuts and nut butters, bone marrow.. etc. It will be best for the dogs to eat something that is most natural for them (meat and fats). Brown rice, sweet potatoes and other gluten free carbs will work with most dogs digestive systems and are quite calorie dense.

 

Hello, I am glad you are looking to help these dogs, it is a very noble thing. However, as a liscenced veterinary technician, i must express my GRAVE concern here. You should NEVER, and i do mean NEVER ask and take advice given over the internet, unless it is credible, documented, research-based information. calorie count is NONE OF THE ABOVE.

     fist of all, i believe it is likely out of the shelter's protocol (i would HOPE it would be) for ANYTHING to be fed to the dog's outside of the selected food provided by the medical staff at the shelter. I DOUBT they will allow you to feed them anything outsie of their normal diet.

    secondly, consider the REASON the dogs are underweight. if they are not being fed enough, this should be pointed out to the mangerial staff and the problem corrected. if the dog has a medical condition (such as Giardia, Parvo, etc) it MUST BE TAKEN CARE OF ASAP!

     i beg you, on behalf of all the animals there DO NOT feed ANY of the dogs ANYTHING else without consulting the leading veterinarian. most of the above suggestions are NOT good choices for ANY pet.  RAW BONES?!?!?! are you kidding me?!?!?! good way to KILL all of the dogs in short order.  hot dogs?!? they should not ever be fed to dogs (or people in my opinion). rice and potatoes are not good carbohydrate choices for dogs and offer little to no nutritional value for them. and YES raw eggs will cause salmonella, amongst a host of other probems (gastro-torosion anyone?!?!). fuzzy_a, I pray for the heslth of your dogs......

  i appologize, as i realize this will come of as hoitey-toitey to some of you. but for the SAKE OF THE ANIMALS i cannot remain silent. PLEASE contant the lead veterinarian if you feel you MUST bring some kind of outside food for them. dog food (especially high quality premium foods) are FORMULATED FOR DOGS!!!! people food is not. it is as simple as that. regardless of the nutritional value (or lack thereof) of the food you bring in, it most likely will cause intestinal upset, and at BEST you will be spending yournext week cleaning up projectilevomit and liquid diahrrea from all of those poor animals.

    if they are underweight, it DOES need to be addressed. clinical and medical problems need to be ruled out, and if the dog is foud to be healthy, a dietary plan can be ade up at that point. im glad you are trying to help them, believe me, i am only trying to steer you in the direction BEST for the animal. PLEASE do NOT take any of the so called "advice" you have found here about cheap things to feed dogs. a cheap diet only leads to expensive medical problems in the future.

55 Replies (last)
Advertisement
Advertisement