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Getting an MBA/masters/advanced degree while working full time


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I'm considering getting an MBA or masters degree. I work full time and also my commute is far (over an hour).  I want to see if maybe I can do this strictly online or maybe even a university/program that meets only on the weekends.  I am concerned about my ability to dedicate to my studies.  Has anybody else delt with classes plus working full time? any advice?

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oops double

Thats what I'm doing now.

Depending on your program, if its offered on Troy Ecampus I would do that. Troy is a college thats main campus, and 2 others ,are in ALabama (where I'm from), and they have an EXCELLANT ecampus, mostly advertised towards military but anyone can use it.


Instead of taking 5 classes at a time, which is difficult while work, or 4 classes, whatever..they seperate semesters into terms, so while your in the Fall semester you have term 1 and term 2, and you can take 2 classes in term 1 (9 weeks) and 2 classes in term 2(another 9 weeks) which equals 4 classes in a whole semester, which is full time. Troy is accredited, and a very well known college/online college. Their main campus is well known enough that they have played LSU, Georgia, Nebraska, and Oklahoma in football. Check it out.

http://www.troy.edu/ecampus/

 

p.s. 250 dollars a credit.

i know lots of people who've done it, but i know that i personally couldn't have. i needed to focus on just my master's and get through it as fast as possible.

i have many friends who've gone to grad school while working part or full-time and raising kids. they've done it, but it's taken five, six, seven years. i also have friends who've finished all their course work and then gone back to work while writing their theses. most of them haven't finished, and many never will.

I'm in vet school (not exactly an "advanced degree", but it's roughly the same thing) and I work/intern around 35-60 hours a week. I'm actually at work right now (9:45PM) and I'll get home a little after midnight so that I can get up and drive to school (almost two-hour commute) at 8:00. It's rough and it's taxing physically and mentally. There are times (sometimes pretty long stretches) where I'm so exhausted that I can barely function--not only that, but I lose sight of my goals and start thinking that it's not worth the hell I go through. My point is that it's difficult. But it's most definitely doable.

My best advice...don't spend a lot of time thinking about what you have to get done in a day. Just do it. I make myself miserable worrying about being too tired throughout the day and a million other little things, so I've stopped thinking about them altogether. It's made my life a lot easier.

My husband got his MBA while working full-time in finance.  It's do-able, but takes a lot of drive.  You have to be willing to give up your free time in favor of going to class, doing your reading, writing papers, etc.  You could probably put in less energy and still pass, but not get the full benefit of the MBA education ... so I guess the question there is whether the degree or the education is the point.  He did it working days and attending evening classes and doing homework on the weekends.  It can be done if you want it.  Good luck!

I work in the graduate admissions office at my college and they are paying for me to get my MBA. I also have a hour drive to and from school. While I only work 20 hours a week, I am in class with so many full-time working men and women. You might want to consider something like that or just getting a graduate business certificate. Either way more education never hurt anyone and you never want to look back on your life and go "what if". Just my advice. Good luck!

I work full-time and am getting my Master's. However, I don't have the commute you do. For me, that would make it hard. For the first two months of my first semester of grad school I was commuting an hour each way everyday on top of the time it took me to get from my uni to my job. It was really hard and by the time I got home and ate dinner I had to go to bed. Then I was left cramming all of my homework into the weekend. I took a financial loss and moved next to campus and it's been easier. 

If you can find an online program it'd probably be easier for you because of your travel time. I will finish within two years but I will spend this summer getting my thesis written so I have two months at the start of next semester to prepare for my thesis defense.

My hubby did it and also had 4 kids.  Go for it! Best of luck!

#9  
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I am doing it now.  I am two classes from finishing the on-line MBA program at University of Phoenix while working full time with an hour + commute.  I also have a family.

It is difficult.  Do-able, but tough.  Expect to not have a life for the next couple years.  The program at UoP is one class at a time, but they are only six weeks long, so they are VERY condensed.  They take massive amounts of work and the entrance counselors don't really convey that very well.

If you decide to do it, make sure you have LOTS and LOTS of time to devote to it.  This is not something you can do halfway.  There have been many times that I just wanted to curl up and quit.  It takes huge amounts of motivation and drive.  Only do it if you really have the time and energy.  It's not easy or quick.  Don't let anyone sell you that line.

My dad got an MBA working full time and my brother got his Masters (either finance or accounting) working full time.  I think it took each about 3 years.

If you can find a program that's close to work and can save on driving time that way I'd do it.  Online degrees probably won't be viewed as highly by a lot of employers.

I'd really like to start this within the next couple of years, so this thread is really helpful.

Original Post by floggingsully:

If you can find a program that's close to work and can save on driving time that way I'd do it.  Online degrees probably won't be viewed as highly by a lot of employers.

 This used to be the case, but not so much any more.  As long is the program is accredited, the school choice doesn't matter as much as it once did.  Especially with the number of people who want to further their education on their own time, the online option is a good one.  So much so that my employer actually pays for my MBA program... and it is completely online.

Original Post by joriel16:

Original Post by floggingsully:

If you can find a program that's close to work and can save on driving time that way I'd do it.  Online degrees probably won't be viewed as highly by a lot of employers.

 This used to be the case, but not so much any more.  As long is the program is accredited, the school choice doesn't matter as much as it once did.  Especially with the number of people who want to further their education on their own time, the online option is a good one.  So much so that my employer actually pays for my MBA program... and it is completely online.

that may well be true, but i learned more from discussions in class than i did from readings and assignments. i had to take two classes on-line and they both sucked.

PG, I get a lot from the on-line discussions.  It is in a forum format similar to CC.  It allows the conversation to continue beyond a set time in the classroom.

I think it really depends on the kind of program and the personality of the student.  I would venture to say that the person has to really understand how they work and their motivations before researching and choosing the program that is best for them.  Get in the wrong kind of program and it can be a couple years of nails-on-chalkboard.  I wouldn't recommend that for anyone.

I had planned to do this then Life Events sent me off in other directions. Now no time, no money, no energy.  Perhaps later but then again I may just let go of this goal given everythign that has happened with me the past few years.  I just don't think I would have the stamina.

Try to look at schools that would allow you to do your degree part-time. I did my Master online and part-time. It meant that I only had to go to the university to take my exams (2 x 1 week) and I only did 1 semester per year - which really cut the workload.

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