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Renee Williams>Heaviest woman in the world to undergo gastric bypass surgery


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Did anyone see the show on TLC about her? She lost 67 lbs from 914 lbs and then she died of a massive heart attack. I'm morbidly obese, not as much as her but this just hit home with me. I don't ever want to get that big and I know that's where i'm headed if I don't get ahold of this now.

She was a mother and her daughter said she wanted to let other people know to keep fighting to get help. She tried so many times to get someone to help her and to get a Doctor to perform gastric bypass surgery on her but being so obese no one wanted to do the surgery. I can understand why because at that weight it's very risky and she did die of a massive heart attack after losing 67 lbs. It was just too much for her body.

I know we need to 'help ourselves' but she had a disease that was way past needing to lose a few lbs.  

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I don't understand why she needed the surgery? Why not simply ...eat less?

But yea, it seems in her case it was too little too late.

Original Post by loriklorik:

I don't understand why she needed the surgery? Why not simply ...eat less?

Obviously it is not that simple for someone so large - she must have had an eating disorder. But in the end, yes it was up to her to do something about it (not just try and find a doctor to perform surgery), and she didn't. Very sad.

I don't know what she did or didnt try. Maybe she did try on her own. Someone who is that large is not just sick from being obese but they are sick inside their head, there is something going on that makes them want to over eat.

Sometimes it's not as simple as eating less for those people with an eating disorder. It's much like a disease or addiciton to alcohol or heroin.

I have to agree though if she chose not to try and do something about it while waiting for a doctor then she should have.

Original Post by kindal:

Sometimes it's not as simple as eating less for those people with an eating disorder.

 It's always that easy :P You just have to actually want to do it and put a little effort into it.

You don't have to stop eating to do it, just need to make better choices (like no mayo on sandwiches, or eating a little less during a meal and spreading out the snacks a little bit more). I love eating out...but when I start to gain weight, I have to start making my own food so I can track calories better... I don't stop eating, I just get a little smarter about what I am eating.

Surgery is just wanting a magic bullet to do if for you... instead of getting up, learning about it, and taking the matter into your own hands. Some people just like playing the victim I guess....

 

Not everyone is as educated in weight loss as you are, Lorik. Undecided

Thats the first step...getting up and starting to learn about it...thats why people come to this site.... thats why I came to this site.

Did you see the 1000lb+ guy after?  See his family horking down McDonalds before he was to arrive back home?  Jesus.

Overcoming addictions aren't easy, especially when it's food that you absolutely must have everyday.  You're not able to go cold turkey - pardon the pun.  Doesn't matter how much you educate yourself.  If you don't have the willpower, or want, to change it's not going to happen.

Lorik, please. Do you really believe that cutting out mayo on the sandwich of a person who is more than 900 lb will make the difference? For someone who can't move anymore? Someone who has bleeding open wounds of laying in bed all day? Have you ever been obese? Have you ever had an eating disorder? 

 

Addictions are not only about willpower. Addictions are glitches in the system. If I am a heroine user I can't just stop by pure willpower. If I am an alcoholic I don't just stop drinking. 

If it was that easy we wouldnt have so many self support groups, medication and doctors specializing in these fields.

I agree with Jewels. Its not as simple as just watching what you eat. And its not just about willpower, its actually about taking care of yourself. As touchy feely as it is, you have to love yourself enough to want to take care of yourself. If for some reason or another you don't think you are worth it (even subconsciously), then all the willpower really won't help.

It's kind of the same thing as when someone takes drugs, and puts themselves in so much debt in credit cards by spending on trivial things.  It's basically like a self destruction thing once you get to a certain point.

EDIT: and what Mermaid said.

And I can probably see a little of myself in a person like that. My behaivour certain times, could lead me down that path as well. I don't fool myself. Which is why I have to pay attention to taking care of myself. 

Original Post by mermaid3011:

Addictions are not only about willpower. Addictions are glitches in the system. If I am a heroine user I can't just stop by pure willpower. If I am an alcoholic I don't just stop drinking. 

If it was that easy we wouldnt have so many self support groups, medication and doctors specializing in these fields.

 Yes. This is very much true. Coming from someone who works with people like this every day, (I am a Reg. Dietitian in a hospital that performs bariatric surgery) morbid obesity is just as much a mental disorder as it is a physical one. The "addiction" to food often does not end after the surgery is performed. I see many, many patients 1-2 years out from surgery who are regaining weight, and/or have not ever met their goal weight because they continue to force food into their bodies.

I saw a woman on TV who had had weight loss surgery, and she knew exactly how many hours she had to wait before she could eat another Snickers.

She was one of many who are regaining after the surgery, and at a much worse risk to their health.

It's not magic.

Original Post by gddrdld:
Yes. This is very much true. Coming from someone who works with people like this every day, (I am a Reg. Dietitian in a hospital that performs bariatric surgery) morbid obesity is just as much a mental disorder as it is a physical one. The "addiction" to food often does not end after the surgery is performed. I see many, many patients 1-2 years out from surgery who are regaining weight, and/or have not ever met their goal weight because they continue to force food into their bodies.

Something I have been wondering that you may be able to answer, since you work in a hospital that performs bariatric surgery is why bother to perform surgery?  I mean, if morbid obesity is a mental disorder, why search for a physical cure?  As a society, wouldn't we be better off to try to find another therapy that makes it possible for people to lose weight slowly and safely?

Original Post by loriklorik:

Original Post by kindal:

Sometimes it's not as simple as eating less for those people with an eating disorder.

 It's always that easy :P You just have to actually want to do it and put a little effort into it.

 Wow, that is a very dangerous thing to say and I highly recommend anyone with an eating disorder to disregard that comment. 

Original Post by dkenworthy:

Original Post by gddrdld:
Yes. This is very much true. Coming from someone who works with people like this every day, (I am a Reg. Dietitian in a hospital that performs bariatric surgery) morbid obesity is just as much a mental disorder as it is a physical one. The "addiction" to food often does not end after the surgery is performed. I see many, many patients 1-2 years out from surgery who are regaining weight, and/or have not ever met their goal weight because they continue to force food into their bodies.

Something I have been wondering that you may be able to answer, since you work in a hospital that performs bariatric surgery is why bother to perform surgery?  I mean, if morbid obesity is a mental disorder, why search for a physical cure?  As a society, wouldn't we be better off to try to find another therapy that makes it possible for people to lose weight slowly and safely?

 That's a good question. Morbid obesity is BOTH a mental disorder as well as a physical one. Ideally, bariatric surgery would be viewed as an "adjunct" therapy along with behavioral therapy, physical therapy and intensive Medical Nutrition Therapy performed by a team of a psychiatrist, a physical therapist and reg. dietitian that are sensitive to the needs of the morbidly obese patient. These people need more ongoing support than they generally get, both before and after the surgery. The sugery is not a "cure" for obesity, but simply a piece of the puzzle.

Once it's 900+ pounds, it's not just regular obese anymore. There's obviously something wrong where they just can't take the steps they need. I would really think it's an addiction, not just someone over indulging themselves. I'm sure it started that way, but it's changed into something they can't control. I've seen stories where the person will cause a huge fit if not fed, and fed a lot. It's like someone looking for their next fix.

But surgery isn't magic. It's more like...a big push in the right direction. I have two family members that have gone through the lap band surgery (not as drastic, but for the sake of argument) and they have both gained some of their weight back after the initial loss. Both are still obese (it's been...two, three years maybe). When someone that big gets a surgery, they're going to have to be in the right mind set to make drastic decisions with their lifestyle. The thought of it being a magic fix...doesn't get people very far. The stomach will stretch again and the person will regain the weight.

There was a man on Oprah who was 1000+ pounds, made his way down to 198 through dieting, and then went right back up and had to be fork-lifted out of the house. Even getting all that weight off, he just didn't have the knowledge to maintain. :(

I just imagine it's a very difficult situation for all involved.

I can only just imagine the degree of self-loathing experienced by this human being. I think she was completely living outside of her body. People need to recognise that this level of obesity is a form of self-harm: she was literally killing herself with food. Its like telling a cutter or an anorexic just to 'get a grip' and exercise some self-control. Don't underestimate the complusive urge that accompanies these psychological disorders.

I agree with lorik. We all have choices. For those of us on here to lose weight (like myself), we all chose to gain weight. Now, we have all made the choice to lose that weight. She could have seen a doctor wayyyyyy before she got to 900 pounds, but she chose to keep eating and ignore her health.

That is what sets us humans apart from most other animals, the recognition and knowledge that our choices have direct consequences, and the ability to do something about it, or ignore it.

Yes we all have choices - but the problem with addiction is that you no longer feel you have a choice,  You know its wrong and is killing you but you are compelled beyond your own reasoning to continue with the destructive behavior.  There is also a whole neurological component - the brain becomes rewired to experience  relief by engaging in those destructive behaviors.  Breaking the pattern means rewiring your brain yet again to finding a new neurological pathway.  Think of it like losing an arm and having to retrain yourself to do everything with your non-dominant hand.  Its very difficult and not at all about "will power".

There IS a point where will power is not enough and completely ineffective in dealing with addiction.  It does not matter if the addiction is food, gambling, sex, drugs, alcohol etc.  The very fact that people fail is an indication that will power is only one factor in the addiction.  You can not will away depression, you can not will away any mental disease, so why do people think you can will away eating disorder or addictions to substance?

I am surprised anyone would seriously entertain the idea that the morbidly obese can just "will" themeselves to make better choices.  I am quite certain that if this was the case they would not have allowed themselves to become morbidly obese in the first place.  Who would allow their lives to be so deeply effected if they could simply use "will power" to change what they are doing?

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