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How much do you spend on groceries per week on 1 person?


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I just came back from my grocery shopping... and I spent like 65 dollars... darm (yes darm is a word! LOL jk)... Usually one grocery shopping lasts me a week although I do have piles of food in my pantry as well...

 

But I can't just not go grocery shopping every week because I run out of fruits and vegetables! and when I'm there i just grab things like "OOH this looks good" "this looks healthy lets check it out!" "I wanted to cook with this before!" etc.

Also I rotate between two grocery stores (one's cheap the other one has more choices) when I goto the cheap one I can get away with like $20-40 dollars a week...

the more expensive one that I visit every two weeks or so... costs me like 60 dollars.

I'm stocking food for this semester (like cheese, hummus, more cheese, etc... I only eat one container/one package of these things a semester and once I run out I run out) but 65... urgh;

I don't eat out much though.. I take food to my internship and eat out like once or twice a week with friends. but still...

how much do you spend on food per week guys?

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I typically spend £50-60  ($70-80?) on food & other groceries each week for two of us.  That covers packed lunches and all meals because we rarely eat out.  Some tips that might help you spend less...

  • Plan your meals a day or two ahead trying to use up some of your cupboard contents rather than stockpiling things you already have.
  • Shop with a list..... or shop online if you have that service available to you.  This cuts down impulse buying
  • Only go into a supermarket once a week... keep vegetables in the fridge so that they last longer.   The more often you pop into a supermarket for a couple of items the more often you come out having spent £20 on things you probably didn't need anyway
  • Set aside your food budget in cash and use that when you go shopping or eating out.  When the cash runs out you know to eat the food in your cupboards and not go buying yet more.
  • Buy basic 'ingredients' rather than ready-made or packaged food - especially 'diet' or '100 cal packs'.  e.g. rolled oats rather than fancy breakfast cereals.  It's much cheaper
  • Buy own-brands or brand-free foods rather than branded....  All you're paying for often is a fat advertising budget and fancy packaging.
  • Eat less meat and more beans and other vegetarian foods.... Make meat a 'treat'

Already do most of these except planning my meals and cash part... I did the cash thing before but I just take out money and dont care about how much I take out. URgh. I might do it again with more careful planning.

I usually plan out my meals after my shopping.. haha.. bad idea... I have rest of the semester to finish of my cabinet though, might as start now. i don't eat out and usually pack my lunches as well :/ oh well~ I'm sure this week's food will last me a bit longer than usual...

As an experiment once, I decided not to go grocery shopping in favour of using up all the things in the cupboards & freezer.  With a few exceptions like fresh milk I managed to go a full two and a half weeks just by creating meals out of food I already had available.  Wasn't always the most exciting menu, admittedly.  Expect some households could go even longer than that.

 

Original Post by gi-jane:

As an experiment once, I decided not to go grocery shopping in favour of using up all the things in the cupboards & freezer.  With a few exceptions like fresh milk I managed to go a full two and a half weeks just by creating meals out of food I already had available.  Wasn't always the most exciting menu, admittedly.  Expect some households could go even longer than that.

 

I do this regularly, and am always surprised how long I can go (sometimes about 2 weeks!) before I really HAVE to go to the store.  Of course I'm not eating fresh, raw vegetables by that point, but I have plenty of frozen veg & protein as well as staples like beans, lentils, brown rice.

Hubby and I have a $250/month grocery shopping budget, which comes out to approximately $65/week for two people.  When I lived alone, I stuck to a $150/month budget.  Yes, we like simple, staple meals, and don't usually go for the "trendy" veggies/meats - which are usually more expensive.  We have just figured out what works for us and stick to those items...which helps stick to our budget.

gi-jane already gave you some good tips.  I'll just add that if I'm "running low" on things close to that last week of the month, I will hold off on going to the store as much as possible - the only exception is if we need milk, or if an item that is typically really expensive (Kashi cereal, for example) has come on sale and will go back to its regular price by the next budget cycle.  

It really helps me stick to our grocery budget if I stock up on things when they come on sale (frozen veggies, chicken breast, cereal, coffee, etc).  Typically sales happen on a cycle, so if you plan it well enough and stock up, you can usually make it to the next sale.  Of course, that means having enough space to store things ;)  And the funds to be able to spend a whole bunch in one fell swoop!  The savings do add up, though, if you are able to do it.

Anyway, sorry for rambling.  Hope some of this helped.

edited to add a few more thoughts.

I think I spend about £30 a week on average. Some weeks it's more like 20, some weeks more like 40. But I too could probably go for a week or two without groceries because of all the canned/frozen foods, lentils, grain, etc I have.

Wow.  I definitely spend more than you guys.  $65 - $100 a week.  Mind you, I don't look at prices.  I've decided I'm going to eat well, so that's what I'll do.  I buy fresh blueberries and strawberries all year round, and I always opt for organic produce when it's an option.  And also, because I can't cook, there are certain convenience foods that I pay a premium for - frozen seasoned chicken breasts or salmon fillets for example, are $10-15 per package.  I probably shop more often because my office is in a mall, and there's a Metro grocery store right upstairs.  Yes, Metro is probably one of the more expensive grocery stores around, but the only option in my town is Wal-Mart and No-Frills.  I've found Wal-Mart's produce to be less than consistant (although there's nothing like finding freeze dried caterpillers in your broccoli to kill your appetite!), and the local No Frills is just the most disgusting, rodent infested old store you cound imagine!

My wife and I spend as low as $120 and up to over $200 a week.  Most of our meat and fresh veggies come from the farmers market, milk, eggs, cheese, cereal, beans, etc from the grocery store, we get some specialty stuff from Trader Joe's or Whole foods every once in a while.

For us, groceries & personal care products (soap, shampoo, etc.) amount to about 500-550 per month (2 people).

Please note:

  • We eat a lot of meat.
  • About 40$ is from bottled water.
  • About 50$ is from dog food & treats.
  • We invite people over for dinner about 2 times a month.
  • We eat out 1-2 times a week (mostly lunches).

 

Living on my own, and being a poor university student, I spend about $20 max. a week on groceries; that's assuming that my pantry or is stocked with the staples (rice, potatoes, flour, pasta, canned veg, chinese noodles, sauces, dry cereal, frozen meats). I normally buy non-perishables and frozen foods when they're super cheap, and then I'll keep them in my pantry/freezer for later use. Then, each week I spend my money on perishable goods (eggs, milk, yogurt, fresh vegetables and fruits) if they're on sale. Having to work with what I have"stocked-up" at home + my weekly cheap perishable finds makes for some pretty creative meal combinations :P

i probably average around $60/week for myself.  big ticket items include dog food ($50 every 6 weeks) and coffee ($12-16 every 3 weeks). 

i make about 90% of my meals, and take my lunch to work.

I can spend between $20-$60 for myself depending on where I shop and what I need to buy. It always seems like I run out of everything at once, and then I'm out stocking up on lots of items... but then other weeks, I just need to pick up some more fruits and veggies and eggs and such.

I recently started going to a cheaper market nearby, though, and I am so thrilled by it. The last time I went there to buy food for a dinner, and got 5 steaks, and other fruits and veggies for $12. And it was delicious.

I average about 55/week on groceries. And I eat pretty well. If I needed to save money, I could cut it to 40/week pretty easily. Funny, I always thought "eating healthy" would be wayyy more expensive than just eating out....

i spend about 70-100 bucks a week for just me. that doesn't include the 100or so bucks i spend on ice cream a month. 

I spend $30 - $40 dollars a week, though that includes dog food. I typically buy Eggs, Milk, Veggies, and Cereal - Meats if I have money left. Once every 3-4months, I spend closer to $100 (or more) buying grains, seasonings, canned goods, condiments, etc.

I feel like I spend a lot here. Produce is 2-4x times the price that it is in the US so I try to keep it simple and buy in-season stuff as much as I can. Some things, though, never change in price though (i.e. Avocados-- 2 for $8). I usually spend about $30-40 at the supermarket and farmer's market (total) plus the occasional eating out. Luckily, eating Korean food is cheap so I never spend more than $8-15 total on eating meals out. 

Original Post by gi-jane:

As an experiment once, I decided not to go grocery shopping in favour of using up all the things in the cupboards & freezer.  With a few exceptions like fresh milk I managed to go a full two and a half weeks just by creating meals out of food I already had available.  Wasn't always the most exciting menu, admittedly.  Expect some households could go even longer than that.

 

I do this. I do a lot of preserving of my food during the harvest so I've got an entire year worth of canned and frozen food. We purchase a side of beef from one of our friends every year. This year we are raising our own beef so we won't have to purchase that any more. So I spend about 30.00 a week for a family of 7. This is just for bread and milk and the other essentials we need. If hubby goes he spends more, but he just buys junk food.

I've put a dent in my freezers, I opened them up this weekend and thought, wow were starting to go through the stash. lol

Original Post by gi-jane:

As an experiment once, I decided not to go grocery shopping in favour of using up all the things in the cupboards & freezer.  With a few exceptions like fresh milk I managed to go a full two and a half weeks just by creating meals out of food I already had available.  Wasn't always the most exciting menu, admittedly.  Expect some households could go even longer than that.

 

In the winter of '08-'09, we got snowed in and couldn't get to the highway for 20 days. It took several days to dig down to our root cellar door, and then we were fine until we ran out of bread. We had yeast and books though, so learned how to make our own bread. We have been making our own bread ever since.

We spend between 30 and 60 a week for the two of us, and we eat really well but not a ton of meat. It would be nearly half that if we didn't get our meat, eggs, cheese, and veggies from Farm to City. (A buying club that gets goods from local farms and artisans)

If you really want to put a dent in your bill, plan meals around sale circulars. You can usually get coupons online to make those deals even better. I track this blog, and she keeps me up to date on freebies and good sales etc. http://networkedblogs.com/p27235299

I am jealous that she can get her groceries down to like 1/3 her price. But in good conscience I can't support CAFO meat. /climbs off soapbox

I shop for 4 people, but I'm sure my teenage son eats $1,465.87 worth of groceries every week.

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