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Gluten free vegan?


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I recently found out I'm allergic to gluten, and I'm concerned I won't be able to keep up a gluten free and vegan diet, especially when eating out. I don't want to stop being vegan, though. Is anyone else in this position? Do you think it's possible to do and still be healthy?
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I'm not gf, but I know there're TONS of vegans who don't eat gluten!

Especially within the raw food movement- no gluten in that. 

 

Try going on here for some recipes:

http://www.findingvegan.com/tagged/glutenfree

 

It'll be tough eating out, but it's tough eating out no matter what when you're gluten free. Though, vegan restaurants tend to be more sensitive to gluten-free people, so that right there is a plus :)

You'll definitely be able to do both. It's very difficult, and your dining out option will mostly be salad but it is possible.  And if you live in a city they might have some more GF vegan options. I live in DC and there are definitely places here.

How are you faring so far?

http://freefoodfreedom.com/2012/04/04/gluten- free-vegan-cauliflower-pizza-crust/ <- delicious pizza crust from a Gluten Free Vegan.

 

A lot of folks will go vegan based on allergies alone! There are tons of gluten free vegans, so many that an omnivore friend of mine assumed gluten was some sort of vegan thing, not an intolerance to wheat protein.

You've made/ had that pizza crust? How was the experience, both making it and the taste? 

Hi! Check out Oh She Glows, Happy Herbivore, and Post Punk Kitchen (all blogs)! :-)

#6  
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It won't be easy, but it's possible. For example, you can go to Chipotle (if you have one where you live). Get a burrito bowl with brown rice, black beans (pinto are not vegan), guacamole, salsa and lettuce. There are many websites you can go to. Type "gluten-free vegan blogs" in google. You will find a lot.
I've recently (past two weeks) have completely eliminated all gluten and dairy from my diet, because I was convinced I had lactose an gluten intolerance. I feel tons better not eating the stuff. It's hard to resist bread, and cheese and ice cream, but I'm doing it. I'm hoping it'll help me get back to the weight i want too.

What are you doing to supplement this change? literature? food planning? That sounds like so much change. The GF thing just seems tricky to me.

Gluten IS NOT healthy. Why would you think that removing it would make you any less healthy?

Gluten intolerance is a BLESSING in disguise. 

I have been a vegetarian for almost a year and realized I was lactose intolerant about 10 months ago. A month ago I stopped eating gluten and have felt great. It is definitely hard though! I'm not technically vegan because I eat eggs, butter, and Greek yogurt but no other dairy and meat as well as no gluten! I've found myself having a hard time recently to feel full off of a normal portioned meal. Anyone have any tips?

If you want to eliminate your allergy, you can do what I did and go through NAET treatments.  It's holistic and there are no needles or medicines.  It has saved me!!!  Go to www.naet.com to check it out.  Good luck!

I follow a gluten-free vegan diet, and I exercise 6-7 times a week, and I am really healthy. I have a recipe blog which mainly revolve around tasty, healthy, vegan recipes, most of which are also gluten-free. I avoid cooking with highly processed food, sugar, white carbs, saturated fat, etc., yet I don't want to sacrifice good taste. For inspiration you can check out the link to my recipe blog on my profile.

Best of luck to you :)

I've been doing gluten free vegan for about 4 months now. It definitely is not easy eating out but at home is no big deal. I recommend reading The Starch Solution by Dr. McDougall for ideas but just don't eat anything that contains gluten. Or you could just go the raw route which can be more challenging. I recently learned that whole oat groats do not contain gluten because they have not been processed, just rinse them really well and cook in the crockpot over night 4:1 water: oat ratio. Then I've been doing quinoa with veggies for lunch and home made baked beans with a salad for dinner. There is a lot of really good information out there. Go to www.drritamarie.com she has some really good info on avoiding gluten and a very thorough list of hidden sources depending on how sensitive you are. Good luck I know you can do it!

Dried pinto beans contain no animal by products.  Therefore, they can be eaten as a vegan food.

Yup.  I've done it for Lent several years now, and I always feel great when I do it.  Remember that several vegetable sources besides beans have a bit of protein - dark leafy greens, pumpkin, butternut squash.  It does add up. 

I second the motion about trying quinoa! http://www.celiac.com/articles/21825/1/Quinoa -the-Amazing-Gluten-Free-Grain/Page1.html

A grain with a nice amount of protein, gluten-free, tasty!

A general heads-up - you will be prone to lose lots of weight quickly this way without even trying, so be careful to track your actual intake.  Weight loss is great.  Scary-fast weight loss is not.

Original Post by ellemk7:

It won't be easy, but it's possible. For example, you can go to Chipotle (if you have one where you live). Get a burrito bowl with brown rice, black beans (pinto are not vegan), guacamole, salsa and lettuce. There are many websites you can go to. Type "gluten-free vegan blogs" in google. You will find a lot.


Dried pinto beans contain no animal by products.  Therefore, they can be eaten as a vegan food.

personally, I'm grain sensitive so I understand the hardships in eatingout(though im only sensitive so i can get away with a sauce, or even a little bit of corn here and there; i also try to stay away from starchy things like beans and potatos, etc). nuts are really delicious, healthful, and helpful with diets, as are things like avocado etc. if you're vegan for ethical reasons(im assuming you are from the post), you might want to consider going vegetarian and just not eating anything that was living. tofu and other grains are always good options though if you really are reluctant to switch.

go to celiac.com and download your list - you will have to learn the sneaky things in processed foods - Most vegetarian foods include gluten - and that is why you need to learn all the additives that are not GF, including veg  burgers, turkey, etc You can still have qunuoa, brw rice, buckwheat groats, do sprouting, brown rice tortillas and bread (Rudi's is great).  You are going to need to monitor your diet well since you may be missing alot of nutrients  that you need for health being vegan and now GF - add more raw foods, protein shakes like Vega protein.  I have been GF, Dairy free and soy free for over 10 years. I find eggs helps my protein intake and drink protein shakes then the rest is veggies raw and steamed - light on the fruit.  hope this helps. 

IOriginal Post by AmyLizK:

You'll definitely be able to do both. It's very difficult, and your dining out option will mostly be salad but it is possible.  And if you live in a city they might have some more GF vegan options. I live in DC and there are definitely places here.

How are you faring so far?

I'm in MD and in the DC area too! As far as eating out- you can- and should be- able to tell the restaurant you have gluten intolerance, and you DO have the ability to make request. I do it any and every time. I am gluten intolerant, IBS, pescatarian, and avoid dairy- except whey-

It is more than possible after you do some (legitimate and sound) nutritional research, trial and error and food exploration when shopping.

#20  
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Original Post by OctopusRope:

I recently found out I'm allergic to gluten, and I'm concerned I won't be able to keep up a gluten free and vegan diet, especially when eating out. I don't want to stop being vegan, though. Is anyone else in this position? Do you think it's possible to do and still be healthy?

I've been veg or vegan for more than 20 years, but due to health reasons I've been a committed gluten free vegan for the past 6.  You are TOTALLY not alone!  I think there are ways to be a GFV that are very healthy and ways that are not.  Fortunately or unfortunately, there are a lot of gluten free options on the market now.  Just because something is gluten free doesn't necessarily mean it is a healthy choice.  The important thing, especially considering your allery to gluten, is to make nutrient dense, whole foods choices that support and nourish your body.  Lettuce/collard/kale as wrappers for spreads, sprouts, other goodies instead of gluten free bread (which is very high in calories, low in fiber and nutrients and usually contains eggs and/or dairy).  Quinoa, millet, chia, flax, hemp are all very nutrient dense choices.  Brown rice is okay.  Corn pasta, quinoa pasta and rice pasta are all okay in a pinch.  The key with the GF pastas is not to overcook them and not to try to reheat them (they break apart) -- a good use for leftovers is actually to use them as a binder in veggie burgers. 

Fresh veggies, fruits, seeds and some nuts are going to be your mainstay... just as they were when you were vegan before.  Depending on the severity of your allergy, your doc will advise you on what grains you need to avoid.  Some people can tolerate gluten free oats, some can't.  Some do better on no grains.  Quinoa, millet, chia, flax, hemp are seeds (even though you may see the first 2 listed as grains in places).

The big thing to consider while you are transitioning to the gluten free approach is that your gut is going to need some support to heal.  Choosing alkaline foods, getting a good dose of EPA/DHA omega 3 and a good probiotic are all steps to consider.  L-glutamine is another thing to consider for it's supportive properties in gut healing.  Check them out for yourselves.  Your gut will rebalance if you are vigilant.  Cheating, when you're gluten free for Celiac and allergy reasons, is really, really detrimental --- even though you may not feel bad with a small cheat, you will be inflicting harm to your intestinal lining by ingesting the gluten.  So, while I know there may be temptations, I encourage you to keep your eyes on the prize of balanced health!  It gets easier... automatic even!

The GFV Cauliflower Pizza Crust that was linked previously IS really delicious.  That's on my blog.  My kids enjoy it, my husband as well and it's made the rounds at cocktail parties and dinner parties alike to good reviews.  I write and share the way I eat because I think that putting it out there is the best way to inspire others in the GFV boat to get creative in the kitchen.

If you're looking for another great and versatile crust, check out this one --- it's totally a no-fair wonder that you can flavor to suit your tastes, it's ready in a flash and couldn't be easier!  http://freefoodfreedom.com/2011/12/13/polenta -pizza-gluten-free-vegan-yumminess/

Other posters have mentioned dining out.  From my experience, it's fairly simple and not very glamorous most times.  Salads are key.  Salad bars can make it easier to choose what you like and can eat.  Sides of veggies are sometimes vegan and gluten free... sometimes not.  For instance, Texas Roadhouse seems to douse all their sides (even the baked potato) in bacon fat and some of the seasonings they sprinkle on contain gluten.  So, even though I've only ever been in a TR once, I know that the salad greens and naked, fresh veggies are my only safe option.  As you get the hang of it, you'll have no issues asking the allergy questions and requesting to order making combos of things that are listed on the menu or requesting subs for things that are safe entrees with exceptions that can be subbed out.

So, can you be healthy as a GFV?  Absolutely!  If you haven't already, I would recommend "Eat to Live" by Joel Fuhrman; "Thrive" by Brendan Brazier; "Eat Raw, Eat Well" by Douglas McNish; "Live Raw" by Mimi Kirk.  The best thing I've done for myself in the last 6 years was put a dehydrator on my Christmas wish list --- ever since I got my Excalibur 9 tray, making gluten free vegan, high fiber, raw crackers, wraps, chips, sweets, dried fruits, fruit leathers, GFV yogurts... well, in short, that machine has made being GFV very enjoyable and more flavorful than ever!

I wish you great success with this new leg of your journey.  I do hope you'll drop by my blog.  I live it, I love it and I am always happy to share.

Warmly, Sarah

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