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How do I log my juicing?


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On Christmas I got a juicier and I’ve been a juicing fool ever since.  I have been juicing every fruit & vegetable I can buy.   I have now found my new love.  Now how do I log my juice creations on calorie count?  For example this morning I made a juice from 2 apples, 1 lemon, 1lime…but I didn’t eat two apples of 160 calories, I just had the juice of two apples. How do I log the calories?? Help

 
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One of the drawbacks of juicing is that you get all the calories but lose out on the fiber. So 'yes' on calories, 'no' on the fiber for the entry. Check out the nutiritional breakdown and you'll see where the majority of the calories come from.

Another drawback is satiety. For example, if you eat a pineapple, you get sated way before you consume the entire fruit while you can drink all the juice from the entire fruit and still not feel full.

Having said that, I love juicing! I use the pulp to make high fiber muffins and in soups and stews. I tend to use my juicer for my greenie drinks and as a apertif before dinner. I juice grapefruit. I try to consume my fruit whole to get the essential fiber to moderate the sugar intake. I juice the excess of my garden bounty for my own version of V8 instead of buying the processed stuff. Keep juicing, just be aware of the calories & loss of fiber as you plan your meals.

Here's another post on juicing with some good websites.

http://caloriecount.about.com/forums/post/298 8.html

 

Than you so much!  I never thought about the lost of fiber.  I was thinking if I’m drinking all those calories at least I’m getting the fiber.  I love juicing so I’m going to keep on doing it.  I think I’m going to try more veggie juices then fruit. 

Thank you again for the advice!!Smile

What kind of juicer do you have? I managed to get a jack lalann juicer from under $60 (normally around $100). I love juicing!

I use the pulp for adding fiber into other foods like muffins or soups. Apple, carrot, ginger and lemon is one of my favorite whole wheat muffins. For broccoli soup, I juice most of the broccoli and then add everything back into a veggie soup. It thickens it into a consistency without added fat or starch. Top with some grated parmesan and cracked pepper.

I have Breville compact Juicer.  Its works very well!  I think it was about $80 (bed bath&beyond).  Is there a website where you get your recipes for you muffins & soups using the pulp.  I throw out a ton of pulp everyday and I would love to use it. 

hey!

i love juicing and have read many of Jason Vales books and tend to make a juice in the morning with fruit and vegetables and have it with (before) my meals! i add in psyllium husks to ensure i have enough fibre and i also add in wheatgrass powder and spirulina powder (a blur green algae) and i can seriously say i can never manage to drink it all and eat my meal as i feel so full and it keeps me full!

the other good thing is i am quite a fussy eater and i couldnt sit down to a plate with vegetables on but i can sit down to a plate with lean meat a little carbs and a nice fruit and vegetable juice! :D

hope this helps a little x

I'm saddened to hear that the calories are just the same as the whole fruit! I never knew how BAD I was eating until I started juicing.  I have so much energy now! Bummer about the calories allthough they are 'good' calories.

But another GREAT purpose for the pulp other than soups and muffins is composting.  I use the pulp in my garden and turn it into the soil... My garden is beautiful and it's a great way to keep the soil full of nutrients and keep my healthy food, more healthy! :-) 

If anybody else has any additional caloric information on juicing...please let me/us know! Thanks!

Melissa

I juice frequently, too.  What I do is create recipes for the juice and smoothies I make and add them to the food log.

@Covertable Chick:  Loosing out on fiber depends on how you juice.  If you juice in the blender you get all the nutrition.  Some green juices I do in the masticating juicer, so I do loose the fiber there.  But, I get a LOT more nutrients because I can drink exponentially more than I can eat.

Actually, when you extract juice you take the fiber calories out of the total calorie count. I think all you need to do as a rule of thumb is to multiply the fiber not consumed by 4 and then subtract that number from the total calories of the drink.

 

Yes, you can save the fiber, freeze it and later add it to soups, muffins, breads etc...

If you do a juice extract fast, for 3 or more days it gives you intestines time to cleanse easier and more naturally. Then slowly add fiber back into your diet.

Also, I use both an extractor and a Vitamix machine for juicing. The extractor only gives me the juice , whereas the Vitamix pulverizes and liquifies the food including the fiber. It's fantastic for giving you superfine fiber enriched raw food , so it's still easy on your digestion and makes superior smoothies.

 

I've found I like to extract juice from  1 3/4 apples, 3 carrort, 3 stalks celery, small chunk of ginger. (carrots are best extracted at all times because their fiber is really tough, so for best smoothly consider extracting hard fibrous food via extractor.)

Then I go to my Vitamix, add 1-2 cups spinach, 1/4 cup parsley leaves,add mixture from extraction, add 1/4 apple and turn that baby on! let is spin good 2 minutes to really get everything super smooth, then add up to 12 ice cubes while spinning. blend until you don't here the ice clinking and you're ready to eat!

This is one of my favorite super juices, my recipie get's an A on Calorie count and the only bad thing about it is sugar from apples and carrot. I sometime add pinapple juice to and this make this drink even more addictive. Full of wonderful stuff though for your body. If you extract out the fiber calores it's about 370 calors for nearly 2 quarts of joy!

Have fun!

 

Michael

 

Multiply the grams of fiber in your fruit or vegetable by four (because every gram of fiber has four calories in it).

Subtract the amount of fiber calories from the total calories

From:

 http://www.ehow.com/how_5155227_count-calorie s-juicing.html

Original Post by diane1533:

 

Multiply the grams of fiber in your fruit or vegetable by four (because every gram of fiber has four calories in it).

Subtract the amount of fiber calories from the total calories

From:

 http://www.ehow.com/how_5155227_count-calorie s-juicing.html

This topic is from 2008 with the last response over a year ago.

Original Post by bierorama:

Original Post by diane1533:

 

Multiply the grams of fiber in your fruit or vegetable by four (because every gram of fiber has four calories in it).

Subtract the amount of fiber calories from the total calories

From:

 http://www.ehow.com/how_5155227_count-calorie s-juicing.html

This topic is from 2008 with the last response over a year ago.

So what?

#13  
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Original Post by kristpin:

Than you so much!  I never thought about the lost of fiber.  I was thinking if I’m drinking all those calories at least I’m getting the fiber.  I love juicing so I’m going to keep on doing it.  I think I’m going to try more veggie juices then fruit. 

Thank you again for the advice!!Smile

I love veggie juices! I usually make a cup of carrot one for myself and a tomato one for my bf:) What's important I add some cream to carrot juice to make its  vitamines digest perfectly:)

 

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you may want to try this;

http://www.ehow.com/how_5155227_count-calorie s-juicing.html

you will deduct the fiber (4 calories per gram) from the total calories

#15  
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I'm curious... if you get all the caloies and none of the fiber out of juicing, then are you saying the left over pulp, that one may use in other recipes... has zero calories? Surely the pile of pulp and fiber have some kind of caloric value?

Isn't the removal of the fiber one of the reasons for juicing?

Fiber is undigestable, and by removing it, the liquid nutrition of the fruits and vegetables is much more easily absorbed by the body. When you add fiber into the juice or drink the juice with food, it makes it harder to digest.

Also, when juicing, you have to balance out the bitter greens with the sweet fruits. So, for every big bunch of kale, you can add in an apple, orange, etc.. Having too much sweet fruits can cause blood sugar spikes. The greens should always be the focus. :)

@Spinach Spy- There are probably many different reasons for juicing.  I don't necessarily think fiber removal is a specific goal anyone should shoot for. :) But, for me, it was easier to drink a bushel of kale than to chew it.  Most of the time, I would choose to keep the fiber in my juice (except if the veg is too fibrous, such as kale).  The reason for juicing, in my case, was to help break through the cell walls (cellulose), so that I could extract more nutrition.  When juicing highly fibrous veg, I would use a macerating juicer.  Otherwise, I would throw my veg into my Blendtec so I can enjoy the benefits from whole foods and still have the ease/convenience of drinking bushels of veg.

Original Post by convertible_chic:

Another drawback is satiety. For example, if you eat a pineapple, you get sated way before you consume the entire fruit while you can drink all the juice from the entire fruit and still not feel full.


I personally have not had a problem with that.  I currently have juice for breakfast and dinner and some kind of healthy lunch.  My morning juice gets me through to lunch and then I eat solid food which gets me to dinner which is juice.  I think if you eat solid food for what you consider the meal you need the most (for me it's lunch), you'll be fine with juicing at other times.

This is a great tip of what to do with the pulp afterwards. Has this been tried in like stir-frys? 

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