Weight Loss
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Is anyone else bothered by the sheer amount of ignorance in regards to weight loss?


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So many people are still under the impression that eating food with a "high" (what exactly IS a high number anyway?) number of carbohydrates (Carbs) makes you gain weight. Or food with X amount of Fat grams in it makes you lose weight.

Whenever someone begins blabbering about how they're on a low-carb diet I just take out a paper and write:

 

Universal formula for weightloss:
Calories in - Calories out = Weight loss

Or rather Calories out>Calories in = Weight loss (or weight gain if you eat too much :) )

 

It's that simple. Unless you have a thyroid problem, don't recite that spiel: "I tried every diet out there and STILL couldn't lose weight." 

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... yes. My grandpa has said some cruel things like, "You don't get FAT eating salads" while downing a salad drenched in ranch dressing and bacon bits.

Original Post by dinnertime:

So many people are still under the impression that eating food with a "high" (what exactly IS a high number anyway?) number of carbohydrates (Carbs) makes you gain weight. Or food with X amount of Fat grams in it makes you lose weight.

Whenever someone begins blabbering about how they're on a low-carb diet I just take out a paper and write:

 

Universal formula for weightloss:
Calories in - Calories out = Weight loss

Or rather Calories out>Calories in = Weight loss (or weight gain if you eat too much :) )

 

It's that simple. Unless you have a thyroid problem, don't recite that spiel: "I tried every diet out there and STILL couldn't lose weight." 

or insulin resistance, pcos, or any kind of hormonal problems.  those things all effect weight.  also, have you ever researched pcos or insulin resistance.  do a google search and see what they recommend that a person eats. nobody recommends extremist style low carb, but for sure there are people out there who need to watch and tweak their carb intake otherwise weight loss is damn near impossible.   also, people arent always going to flat out tell you that they have a hormone problem so its not nice to just judge someone. i do however believe that weight loss is never impossible.  It can be damn near impossible, but the human body is not meant to be overweight or obese and I cant imagine someone literally not being able to lose weight unless its some crazy extreme case.   Im glad weight loss has been so easy for you, but dont be mean just because you feel like you've got it all figured out.

 

OP, the ignorance is coming from your camp, honestly. The macronutrient breakdown of what you eat effects what you lose and what you store. If you consumed a diet of high fructose corn syrup, for example..; you'd lose weight... but you'd gain fat. Low carb is almost to the point of being esoteric among common layman knowledge. People opt for low fat options (For example, yogurts full of sugars to replace the lost taste), which is the last thing they should be doing.

Calories in vs. calories out is a much more complicated equation than just what you eat. Here's a detailed article relating to that: http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/nutrition /new_view.htm


Don't parade around like an expert until you've done actual meaningful research. Proper carb management is an important part of sustained weight (But more importantly.. FAT) loss.

By the way... "thyroid problem" itself is schpiel... people parroting that have absolutely no idea what it means or whether it's even a real, tangible medical "condition"... and not just the regular function of the thyroid that reacts to the person's lifestyle.

Well, I could be wrong, but I have a feeling your post was targeted at my earlier post regarding carb cycling. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I eat all foods. The carbs I consume are low GI healthy and reccommended by all nutrionalists. I am not on a constant low carb diet. Been there, done that.

BUT, I actually do have hormone inbalances which are slowly getting corrected, and it has been extremely hard for me to lose any weight. Manipulating carbs and watching-not cutting out completely-has helped me and is a safe and healthy way to go.

Do some research.

It's not ignorance that bothers me exactly but I think there's an unfortunate tendency these days to condense healthy-eating principles to very simplistic, dumbed-down mantras of 'good' and 'bad.  'Carbs bad'... 'fats bad'... 'water good'.... 'HFCS bad'... 'protein good'....   Makes for great magazine articles but I don't think they help anyone develop a good diet.  And the upshot of these is that someone will think that if a particular nutrient or food-group is 'bad' the ideal diet should contain none of them or that if a food/nutrient is 'good' they should eat that to the exclusion of all else.   So you get one person trying to live on zero fat and another downing 12 egg-whites a day...  neither's really doing themselves any favours. 

I'd like to get away from 'nutritionism'... the fashion to think of foods as purely a clinical collection of nutrients and calories... and back to more traditional eating where flavour/texture/enjoyment is key, wholesomeness is important but everything is good in moderation.  And then, yes.... reduce the portions and do more exercise in order to lose weight.

I hear ya on this one.  My whole department went out to lunch and my boss ordered a bottled green tea with honey.  He said he is trying to cut back on soda to lose weight.  I looked at the label and told him his green tea with honey was just as bad because it had the same number of calories for 8 oz as soda.

He said "It isn't the number of calories, it is the type of calories".

I was floored.  He is a smart guy and I could not believe that he actually thought that. 

Yes!! I got so annoyed the other day when this guy friend of mine advocated going to the sauna and staying in there for at least half an hour to 'lose weight'. I told him that all you'd be losing is WATER but he wouldn't believe me!!


I kept explaining how you needed to actually get up and exercise to lose FAT, and losing water weight is pointless anyway, but he still kept insisting that losing water weight = losing weight. Ergh.

Original Post by ibez:

By the way... "thyroid problem" itself is schpiel... people parroting that have absolutely no idea what it means or whether it's even a real, tangible medical "condition"... and not just the regular function of the thyroid that reacts to the person's lifestyle.

 Although I have to agree that "thyroid problem" is one of the many catch all explanations/excuses that are thrown around way too often, there are cases that are not a result of a person's lifestyle. My sister has been on Synthroid since she was 3 yrs old. That's about 20 yrs before it became hip to have a "thyroid problem". Unfortunately, now,she too uses it as an explanation for her weight problem, and believe me, I've seen her diet, and her thyroid is the least of her problems...

#9  
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Original Post by ibez:

OP, the ignorance is coming from your camp, honestly. The macronutrient breakdown of what you eat effects what you lose and what you store. If you consumed a diet of high fructose corn syrup, for example..; you'd lose weight... but you'd gain fat. Low carb is almost to the point of being esoteric among common layman knowledge. People opt for low fat options (For example, yogurts full of sugars to replace the lost taste), which is the last thing they should be doing.

Calories in vs. calories out is a much more complicated equation than just what you eat. Here's a detailed article relating to that: http://www.johnberardi.com/articles/nutrition /new_view.htm


Don't parade around like an expert until you've done actual meaningful research. Proper carb management is an important part of sustained weight (But more importantly.. FAT) loss.

By the way... "thyroid problem" itself is schpiel... people parroting that have absolutely no idea what it means or whether it's even a real, tangible medical "condition"... and not just the regular function of the thyroid that reacts to the person's lifestyle.


fat =/= weight

Undecided

#10  
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Yes, it's true, calories = calories out.

However, strategic nutrition also plays an enormous role in the preferrential calories your body will decide to burn, depending on your macronutrients as well as when you eat specific foods. 

If you are consuming a high carbohydrate diet then when your body is using it's deficit reserves, it will burn energy  mainly from carbohydrate energy stores versus everyones preffered source, lipid energy. Ideally you want to manipulate your nutrition so that you burn lipids for the most part as opposed to amino acids or carbohydrates.

It gets much more complicated than that but nutrient quality and partitioning will certainly help you achieve your goals at a much more desirable and effective rate, when done correctly.

some people genuinely don't know and probably need a basic class in nutrition to open their eyes to all the myths about food, calories, losing weight, etc...

Man, some of you are really overly critical and somewhat harsh.  I think the OP is simply venting here and not claiming to be an expert on nutrition- jeesh.

I understand the rant b/c let's face it, weight loss wouldn't be a billion dollar a year business if it weren't made so overly complicated and convoluted.  Aside from medical conditions, it really is a simple formula.  Yes, macronutrients break down in different ways in the body.  I can confidently speculate though that the majority of folks striving to lose weight want to lose "weight" (whatever type of weight-- water, muscle loss).  Many folks who "diet" don't take the time to learn about nutrition (their loss) and just want to look good in a pair of jeans.

Selling fast effortless weight loss is a HUGH business, even if it is all BS.

Original Post by gi-jane:

 

I'd like to get away from 'nutritionism'... the fashion to think of foods as purely a clinical collection of nutrients and calories... and back to more traditional eating where flavour/texture/enjoyment is key, wholesomeness is important but everything is good in moderation.  And then, yes.... reduce the portions and do more exercise in order to lose weight.

Exactly. Lifestyle changes would be a lot more sustainable this way as well.

Definitely true in my experience. I lower the calories, I lose weight. Eat too many..gain. Seems very simple in general.

I do agree with the good vs bad carbs though, but not necessarily because the same grams of say, oatmeal carbs have the same effect as cupcake carbs. More because complex carbs make you full, give you nutrients etc, whereas the others are empty.

If you swapped your morning whole grain toast or cereal for cookies, you'd probably feel hungry a lot sooner, and pretty likely to eat more later, right?

I don't buy the theory that processed sugar is all stored as fat..I do cut down but only because my daily calories really don't allow for sweets. I can have them if I want, but I'd have to cut elsewhere, and I'd rather not.

I give myself a weekend day to have things, and I don't count calories that day, but still keep an eye on what I eat.

I've never officially been overweight in my life, and have lost what I meant to, so in my mind, calorie counting is seriously where it's at.

I have no use for diet pills, or low carb blah blah.

Less confusion the better, cause I'm just too lazy and have too much of a life to worry about every carb gram or GI index of something I eat.

 

well, im pretty much prediabetic and on medication for it, so i wont have a life at all if i dont worry about glycemic index and carbs.

ive done extreme style atkins before and i agree that it is stupid.  however, some people have to watch their sugar due to health problems.  the op said that when someone starts telling her about watching their carbs, she picks up a pen and paper and shows them how stupid they are.   i totally agree that calorie counting is essential, but sugar is practically poison to some of us and its not cool to judge just because you've got it all figured out for yourself.

There's a tremendous amount of ignorance, to be sure, but what really makes me sad are the HUGE numbers of teenaged girls and twentysomething women around here who think that starving themselves is the answer.  These are the ED/binge/purge crowd, who have no idea what their bodies actually need (and this is setting aside for the moment dysphorias like anorexia).  These people don't know basic things like 3500 kCal = 1 pound of fat, or that their bodies aren't going to react well to shock-style super-low-calorie regimens.  They don't want to hear "slow and steady with a reasonable deficit."

I don't know why there is such vast ignorance these days.  Don't they teach health class in schools anymore?

To me, one of the biggest spots of ignorance when it comes to people trying to lose weight is the misconception that calories are the enemy - they are not the enemy, in fact we need them for life. Low cal food does not necessarily equal healthy food, nor does high cal equal unhealthy.

Original Post by amethystgirl:

Low cal food does not necessarily equal healthy food, nor does high cal equal unhealthy.

 well said, amethystgirl (per usual!)

Original Post by ibez:
Don't parade around like an expert until you've done actual meaningful research. Proper carb management is an important part of sustained weight (But more importantly.. FAT) loss.

By the way... "thyroid problem" itself is schpiel... people parroting that have absolutely no idea what it means or whether it's even a real, tangible medical "condition"... and not just the regular function of the thyroid that reacts to the person's lifestyle.

 Listen ibez - you said it yourself "don't parade around like an expert..."

Your comment about "thyroid problems" is just that same kind of comment you criticized. 

Regarding "thyroid problems", I don't think anyone wants to hear a medical excyclopedia when discussing their health in a casual way.  "Thyroid problem" is good enough for most people.  I know when discussing my health I don't go into detail and I don't say more than is perinent to the discussion.

If you are going to criticize someone, don't be a hypocrite!

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