Weight Loss
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Do we burn more calories when it's hot?


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Okay, so everyone has been dealing with massive heat for awhile now and the heat has finally hit Seattle.  While I was driving from Seattle to Everett yesterday in the 90+ degree weather @ 5MPH I got to wondering.....Do we burn more calories when we do what we do in the heat?
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no reason you would, unless you exercize more.
you lose more water, though. so drink, drink, drink!
I think you probably might; it puts an excess strain on your body, which is partially why the elderly are told to stay indoors- they simply cannot handle it.

Also, part of the rise in obesity is hypothesized to have something to do with people staying in such comfortable temporatures; as humans are endotherms, they generate their own body heat. When you don't have to work as hard, if at all, to stay at a comfortable temperature, you aren't using as many calories to do so.

However, not 100% sure here; I'd recommend getting another opinion. ^^;;
I read that air conditioning and central heat contribute to weight gain because your body doesn't have to regulate its temperature which causes you to burn calories, how much burning you actually do? Who knows.
No, you lose more weight when you are cold.  When your body shivers to get warm, it is actually flexing muscles to make that heat.  That heat comes from (you guessed it) burning calories.

So, if you can tolerate it, every morning when it's cold, go out and shiver your butt off for 20 minutes.  I don't do it, but it's true and it works better than sitting in heat.
So, setting the AC really high in the summer time helps me burn more calories than if I didn't run the AC at all, and spent my day sweaty?

That is good news, because our AC this summer is running on overdrive and I'm always cold indoors.  I can't imagine the stinky torture it would be to not have AC and live in this sweltering heat!
LOL, no.  you have to be FREEZING, shivering.  Turning the thermostat up when it's cold and down when hot actually does make you lose less weight, but it's a nominal amount. 

I'd rather burn less calories throughout the day than to stink at the end of the day, but that's just me.
I found this article about sauna's and the effect on burning calories. Afterall, Sauna's causes a rise in body temperature from heat and sweat. So, The answer is Yes, high temperatures will make you  burn calories and lose weight, but not for long... read on.

http://cankar.org/sauna/health/health.html

Weight loss Short answer: Going to the sauna does not make you lose weight.

Longer answer: yes, you can burn calories in the sauna, but you will be better off taking a short healthy walk.

Most of any perceived weight loss in a sauna is due to sweating. The loss of bodily fluids will make you lighter for a few hours, but you will get the kilos (pounds) back very soon. You will remain thirsty and when you next drink, the fluids will be restored to your body.

Meanwhile, increased cardiac output and the cooling process make the body use its energy resources. Estimates range from 300 or even 500 calories per sauna session (30 minutes), making it comparable to walking or jogging. In the sauna the only muscles working are those of your heart. While the heart is an important muscle, you would gain more from any physical activity, be it walking or swimming. These make your muscles grow and muscle tissue burns energy even while you rest. Not only will you feel better after a workout, you will be burning fat 24 hours a day.

You will sometimes hear of boxers or wrestlers going to the sauna to lose weight. High end athletes can do this for two reasons. First, they only need to lose weight for a few hours, when they are officially weighed. They will drink a considerable amount of power drinks before entering the rink to get their energy back. Second, they are constantly monitored by their physician who supposedly knows when to stop.

I have been asked whether it makes sense to use rubber suits that promote sweating in the sauna. Not only do I consider it unnecessary, such suits could actually be dangerous since they work by blocking the most important method your body has to adjust its temperature.
i have no idea, lol i knew about the cold
#9  
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Dr. Gabe Mirkin's Fitness and Health E-Zine

 

 

March 6, 2005
Do You Burn More Calories in Hot or Cold Weather?

You burn fewer calories when you exercise in cold weather than you do when it's hot. The hotter it is, the more extra work your heart has to do to prevent you from overheating. More than 70 percent of the energy produced by your muscles during exercise is lost as heat. So the harder you exercise, the hotter your muscles become. In hot weather, not only must your heart pump extra blood to bring oxygen to your muscles, it must also pump hot blood from your heated muscles to your skin where heat can be dissipated.

On the other hand, in cold weather, your heart only has to pump blood to your muscles and very little extra blood to your skin to dissipate heat. Your muscles produce so much heat during exercise that your body does not need to produce more heat to keep you warm. So your heart works harder and you burn more calories in hot weather. This information should not discourage you from exercising when it’s cold, because staying in shape is a year-round proposition. However, it may help to explain why so many people find the pounds creeping on in the wintertime, even when they stay active.

Omg i dont know,but today here a D.C is in the 90s ,went for my running,and tought i was not going to make it home!!!

I always run two times a week outside,and go to the gym 4 days a week for another kind of cardio,weight etc,but today ,i defenitely think ,that burned more calories,i can feel it Wink

 

 

 

 

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