Weight Loss
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1500 Calorie Diet + Weight Training


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Hey guys,

First, I'm trying to lose some weight (about 20 Ibs) I used to do H.I.I.T. 4x a week as a cardio it was great but with a low calorie diet it started to get really hard for me to do so nowadays I changed my program to 1500 calorie diet with 45 min. of free weight training 3x / 4x per week.(Don't know why but I'm always in the mood for lifting weights instead of doing cardio) So I am not doing cardio anymore just trying to create daily 1000 calorie deficit + weight training to prevent any muscle mass loss. I'm 24 years old Male 187 ibs 6 feet tall.

So I would like to ask that what would be the benefits and side effects of doing weight training instead of cardio with a low calorie diet? Would you recommend for weight loss? also is it really impossible to put on some muscle mass with such a low calorie diet? 

 

thanks in advance

5 Replies (last)

Weight training does help maintain LBM in a deficit, but you also need to increase protein consumption so that the extra protein goes to glucose production instead of taking it from your muscle.......and no, with your stats your not going to be gaining anything.......some regional muscle mass shifting will/may occur depending on your routine and the slight possibility of some newbe muscle gains that would only be temporary. imo

You're not going to pack on muscle with your current regimen. Not with deficits that low. Although I'm over twice your age, my goal(s) are not terribly different from yours (although now I'm going for gains in LBM). During the "peak" of my weight loss program I was running deficits of 1000 or more. I was doing a lot of cardio though. Once my fat loss slowed (I was approaching 175lbs) I "switched it up" and began hitting the weights hard, ingesting lotsa protein and good carbs (I always minimized my sugars and saturated fats...no fruit definitely).

I'm now running a calorie surplus but I'm still doing a lot of cardio. If I were you, I'd be doing 3 to 4 cardio sessions of at least 30-40 minutes, hitting the weights hard, consuming calories more in line with a "maintenance diet" (keeping your protein high and your sugars and saturated fats low) and reassess your progress after 2 weeks to see if you need to change anything. Doing it this way, you may not realize any change on the scale, but you should be able to notice a change on overall "leanness" of your physique. Keep an eye on your sodium too.

How is your diet currently?

Original Post by neanderthin:

Weight training does help maintain LBM in a deficit, but you also need to increase protein consumption so that the extra protein goes to glucose production instead of taking it from your muscle.......and no, with your stats your not going to be gaining anything.......some regional muscle mass shifting will/may occur depending on your routine and the slight possibility of some newbe muscle gains that would only be temporary. imo

Thanks for your answer "neanderthin"

 

Original Post by pinegrovedave:

You're not going to pack on muscle with your current regimen. Not with deficits that low. Although I'm over twice your age, my goal(s) are not terribly different from yours (although now I'm going for gains in LBM). During the "peak" of my weight loss program I was running deficits of 1000 or more. I was doing a lot of cardio though. Once my fat loss slowed (I was approaching 175lbs) I "switched it up" and began hitting the weights hard, ingesting lotsa protein and good carbs (I always minimized my sugars and saturated fats...no fruit definitely).

I'm now running a calorie surplus but I'm still doing a lot of cardio. If I were you, I'd be doing 3 to 4 cardio sessions of at least 30-40 minutes, hitting the weights hard, consuming calories more in line with a "maintenance diet" (keeping your protein high and your sugars and saturated fats low) and reassess your progress after 2 weeks to see if you need to change anything. Doing it this way, you may not realize any change on the scale, but you should be able to notice a change on overall "leanness" of your physique. Keep an eye on your sodium too.

How is your diet currently?

First, thanks for your response "pinegrovedave"

My whole story is like; when I first started to lose weight (at 230 Ibs) I used to do 4x  H.I.I.T. + 3x basic free weight training per week with a 1500-1600 calories diet and went 230  to 196 ıbs in about 15 weeks everything was fabulous I was really motivated at that time. Right now I am 187 and I guess I hit the plateau, its really really hard to lose even 2 pounds nowadays and still need to lose 20 more pounds, the problem is I really don't have the energy / motivation for long cardio sessions anymore. Like I mentioned hitting the weights hard is not a problem for me but the cardio is. 

My diet is;

Breakfast:

3 ounces low fat cheese  + 200ml skim milk or coffee + 1 tomato + 1 green pepper + 2 slices of bran/oat bread + 1 whole egg.

Second Meal:

Green salad without any dressing + 4-5 ounces of boiled/grilled chicken breast or Turkey breast.

Third Meal:  

Banana/Apple or 3 ounces of oatmeal with skim milk or some lowfat yoghurt.

Fourth Meal:

  Low fat soup (with lots of good carbs.) + any vegetable meal 

Fifth Meal:

200ml of (1 glass) skim milk with my daily 1000mg omega 3 fish oil pill 2 hours before sleep.

By the way you've mentioned that "keep an eye on your sodium too" could you give more details about that? My only problem about sodium is, I like to eat pickles almost everyday and although they are low in calories they contain high sodium so would it be a problem for weight loss?

Original Post by delikasap:

By the way you've mentioned that "keep an eye on your sodium too" could you give more details about that? My only problem about sodium is, I like to eat pickles almost everyday and although they are low in calories they contain high sodium so would it be a problem for weight loss?

Sure thing...

If one consumes a large amount of sodium daily, the body will generally begin retaining water to compensate for the higher concentration of sodium. In other words, by retaining water, the body reestablishes "equilibrium". If one of your goals is to get "leaner", by reducing your sodium intake, you'll shed more water thus giving you a leaner look. Also, if you're ingesting a lot of sodium, you've got some weight "locked up" in the extra water you're carrying.

Case in point...I was supplementing my protein intake with a lot of Soy Protein Isolate...until I realized that I was going WAAAAY over my sodium limit (The process to extract the Soy Protein involves sodium and then resulting product has a ton o' sodium). I switched to Whey Protein Isolate exclusively (low sodium)...almost overnight I dropped almost 3 pounds...without changing diet or exercise. Vascularity is more pronounced as well.

I'm still going to say that incorporating cardio into your weekly regimen is important though. Is a 30 minute cardio session too much every other day? I know it can be tedious...believe me, I know. For me...I "PUSHED" myself for those 30 minutes...HARD...sweating buckets hard. I still do cardio even though I'm going for gains. I was, during my weight loss regimen, knocking out 60-70 minutes of hard cardio. Now I've backed off to 30 minutes of moderate intensity cardio every other day.

Your diet looks good though, but you might want to up your intake because you most certainly will not make gains on your current diet. HTH

That make sense, thanks a lot for the information Dave. I decided to add daily 30 min. cardio for this week, lets see if I can do Laughing 

cheers!

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