Weight Loss
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How many calories do you think you'd burn while shivering?

Because I just got woken up by a fire alarm and ran out of my dorm in a tee shirt and boxers. At 4 in the morning. I was shivering for like half an hour.

Maybe a bright side can be me logging this? My muscles were shaking, so there must have been some burn.

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I am going to guess that you are kidding here?  Next time grab your robe or sweatshirt when you run out to the fire alarm.

Yeah, next time grab a sweater or something when the fire alarm goes off.

I have a friend who got frostbite on her toes because she didn't have the sense to grab some shoes or slippers when the fire alarm went off. 

I did grab a sweater but it wasn't enough and it didn't cover my legs. Dx I was still shivering. It's cold out there.

Answer: Negligible. If it was that easy we'd all be stripping off every time we went outside!

If you get cold enough and start to shiver, you'll definitely burn more calories -- up to 400 an hour. Shivering is an involuntary tensing of the muscles to heat and warm the body. The same thing is more or less true for people sweating trying to cool themselves down.  When your body has to work to regulate your temperature it is burning more passive calories and is working harder than usual.

I take this into account when I go hunting and have to increase my caloric intake appropriately.

How many calories did I burn typing this post

I guess that I am going to disagree with most people here. As a mountaineer, who does a lot of winter camping and climbing in the cold, I'm experienced with shivering and have read a lot about it as well. It is one of the most caloric intensive things humans do. Your body does it in emergencies to keep your core and brain at functioning temperatures. I don't remember the actual numbers, but severe shivering is probably on the order of your usual hard workout level. Just "trembling" will be less than that though.

Original Post by oldguysrule:

I guess that I am going to disagree with most people here. As a mountaineer, who does a lot of winter camping and climbing in the cold, I'm experienced with shivering and have read a lot about it as well. It is one of the most caloric intensive things humans do. Your body does it in emergencies to keep your core and brain at functioning temperatures. I don't remember the actual numbers, but severe shivering is probably on the order of your usual hard workout level. Just "trembling" will be less than that though.

I just looked it up, and it wasn't as big as I thought. Reducing skin temperatures by various methods caused an overall increase in caloric burn (compared to just standing there) by 200% to 400%. That is the increase, so they were burning 3 to 5 times their normal RMR while they were cold.

These guys were pretty cold. Like shirtless  at 40F air temperatures (but no wind).

Anyone who lives in a cold climate (I grew up in Ontario, Canada) knows that shivering burns calories.  Your body literally BURNS calories to WARM you; it's involuntary exercise.  We always joked as kids about how when it starts snowing you have to pack a bigger lunch because you get hungrier faster after a recess in subzero temperatures.

 

... now, I don't know if half an hour ONE TIME is really significant but... I learned that trying to save on heating costs during the winter is counterproductive since I just end up spending more on food!

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