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Drinking water while eating meals!


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Are there any consequences of this?

Such as more calories etc...

Because it makes me fuller faster, does it cut calories?

Tell me about it please!

Thanks!

15 Replies (last)

You're very anxious aren't you!!!

Drinking water is just that... drinking water.  Doesn't normally require any thought and is a totally normal thing to do.  "Consequences" would be.....  If you drink you're better hydrated.  If you sip water during a meal it slows down the eating process slightly and it means you're less likely to get indigestion.  However water doesn't make you 'full'... water goes out of the stomach quite rapidly unlike food which sits around for a while waiting to be digested.  And it doesn't 'cut calories'...  Your food contains exactly the same amount of calories with or without a drink

Calm down. 

 

the only thing I know of is that drinking water while you are eating will expend your stomach and allow you to eat more.

learned that information from sports science one day when they got a competitive eater to eat 50 meat balls. he kept on drinking water while eating and they explained that the water not only helps make the food go down quicker, it also expends his stomach and allows him to fill more meat balls into his gut.

The reason that you are getting full faster might be that the water is helping the food go down faster and you are actually eating more in the same period of time. you should plan your meals and know exactly how much cal is in your meal instead of trying trick your body into thinking it's got what it needs.

 

The stomach expands no matter what you put in it, water or cabbage or whatever.  The reason people who do eating competitions drink water during the competition is so the food goes down their esophagus smother, not so their stomachs expand more. 

Whatever you put in your stomach fills it up, so if water is part of that then there's less room for food.  That, and because it slows your eating down so you feel fuller sooner, is why drinking water with a meal is recommended for people trying to lose weight.

I know that when I drink water with meals I eat less because I drink SO MUCH of it (150 ounces or more a day), and usually some after every bite. Since I'm drinking after every bite, I'm also eating my food more slowly, allowing myself to feel full sooner. And when I drink all that water, I really do feel fuller because there's so much water in my stomach. Water is great!

The only consequences I know of when drinking water, at any time, is peeing.

I have heard that drinking very cold water will slow down fat digestion and drinking hot tea or luke warm water will help you digest food faster. (I have no idea myself, just passing it along. Maybe someone knows.)

Water does not affect your calories however, some people feel full faster when they drink lots of anything with a meal, so that could cut your calories. But I wouldn't count on it as a sure thing.

But for the most part, as gi-jane said, Calm down.

Original Post by lalagina:

I have heard that drinking very cold water will slow down fat digestion and drinking hot tea or luke warm water will help you digest food faster. (I have no idea myself, just passing it along. Maybe someone knows.)

 If you consider that the core temperature of the body is 37C... even if you drink very cold or very hot water you're not going to affect anything very much at all for very long.   There is a persistent rumour that if you drink iced water your body will burn more energy warming you up again.... total bollocks.   However, drinking warm fluids is generally gentler on the digestion... and therefore a good idea.

Original Post by gi-jane:

Original Post by lalagina:

I have heard that drinking very cold water will slow down fat digestion and drinking hot tea or luke warm water will help you digest food faster. (I have no idea myself, just passing it along. Maybe someone knows.)

 If you consider that the core temperature of the body is 37C... even if you drink very cold or very hot water you're not going to affect anything very much at all for very long.   There is a persistent rumour that if you drink iced water your body will burn more energy warming you up again.... total bollocks.   However, drinking warm fluids is generally gentler on the digestion... and therefore a good idea.

 Actually, it's true....your body has to warm the water up to body temperature, so you burn more calories when you drink cold water as opposed to water that's room temperature.

Original Post by anam713:

 Actually, it's true....your body has to warm the water up to body temperature, so you burn more calories when you drink cold water as opposed to water that's room temperature.

It is true, but so small as to be absolutely meaningless.  I worked out the math once with specific heat coefficients.  If you swallow down one entire pound of ice, ice that's at 0 degrees F (that's -17.8 deg C) and your body works to bring that up to body temperature (98.6F or 37C), that takes the energy of a whopping... 20 calories.

 

To be more realistic (sorry jp, but I try not to make a habit of munching on ice Tongue out), if you drink 2 liters (a little less than 8.5 cups) of ice water a day, you'll burn an extra 74 calories warming it up to body temperature. woohoo.  I like cold water.  This is not the reason I drink it.

Actually, from the standpoint of making the digestive process more efficient it's better not to drink during a meal at all.   The generation of saliva in the mouth begins the digestive process and this is diluted when you drink while eating.  It also dilutes the stomach acids and digestive enzymes if you drink while eating.   But if you drink 20-30 minutes before your meal it helps the uptake of movements and moving the bowels.  If your mouth is dry while eating, chances are you are eating too fast or stressed while you eat, or your saliva glands may have shut down or inhibited function because you are constantly putting something wet into your mouth.

Remember when your Mom yelled at you to chew your food 32 times?  Well this is why...some of those old wive's tales turn out to actually have a real grain of truth to them...lol.

Original Post by johnnypenso:

Actually, from the standpoint of making the digestive process more efficient it's better not to drink during a meal at all.   The generation of saliva in the mouth begins the digestive process and this is diluted when you drink while eating.  It also dilutes the stomach acids and digestive enzymes if you drink while eating.   But if you drink 20-30 minutes before your meal it helps the uptake of movements and moving the bowels.  If your mouth is dry while eating, chances are you are eating too fast or stressed while you eat, or your saliva glands may have shut down or inhibited function because you are constantly putting something wet into your mouth.

Is it odd that this post makes me want to ask where you are from? As a former waitress I spent years working in a historic southern hotel, in which many of the regulars drank copious amounts of beverage while eating. When I waitressed in a New York style italian restaurant, some people didn't drink at all until they finished eating, and I joked with some regulars about never having to refill their drinks. They said it was more common in other parts of the country. I started paying attention, and it may have been right. In the northeast it's not as common to have free refills, or for other people who grew up there to drink steadily throughout their meal (among the people I know), here in the deep south, most people tend to drink lots. If I empty my glass at a restaurant, I will stop eating until it is refilled. I'm so accustomed to drinking during a meal, that I feel like it's hard to swallow after a couple bites without a beverage.

/end tangent

Original Post by dolphinclick:

To be more realistic (sorry jp, but I try not to make a habit of munching on ice ), if you drink 2 liters (a little less than 8.5 cups) of ice water a day, you'll burn an extra 74 calories warming it up to body temperature. woohoo.  I like cold water.  This is not the reason I drink it.

I did the math (what can I say, I'm a geek) and I was off somewhat in my ice recollections - it's -57 calories instead of -20 if you eat an entire pound of 0-degF ice.

Drinking two liters (70.5oz) of ice water, assuming 32 degF, that is indeed -74 calories.  Isn't science fun? Smile

Actually I used to drink more water in able for me to feel full and avoid eating much, I don't know really if this right though its effective for me..

Hello Jessikah,

Going back to topic. drinking water does make you feel fuller, but not for long. Fluids in general tend to pass through the stomach quickly (<30 minutes) whilst solids tend to stay longer making you feel fuller for longer (average total digestion time for a meal is around 3 hours).

The advantage of water is that it is calorie-less. The advantage of solids is that you feel full, so where is the balance?

The answer is soups. Research has shown that soups decreases the levels of ghrelin, a hormone that makes us feel hungry, because soups stay in the stomach longer than water. For explanation of the findings: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8068733.s tm

As a side note, the composition of your meal also makes a difference:  proteins and low glycaemic carbs tends to make you feel fuller for longer. So calorie-for-calorie white meat, pasta, and brown rice will make you feel fuller compared to sugars and drinks.

Hassan E

 

 

Original Post by jp5074139:
Drinking two liters (70.5oz) of ice water, assuming 32 degF, that is indeed -74 calories.  Isn't science fun?

Just to nitpick, ice water is, by definition, 32 degrees F or 0 degrees C at atmospheric pressure.  And it takes a very large change in pressure to change that.  I agree.  Science is indeed fun.

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