Weight Loss
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Eating foods high in fat


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I'm trying to lose weight. Today I had a powerbar (240 cal) and then a sandwich (640). About 200 or so calories are from fat, which is like 50% of the DV, so I'm wondering if in general, will foods high in fat necessarily lead to weight gain, if calories are still kept under control.

What's the difference between a 600 calorie meal with 0g from fat vs a 600 calorie meal with 200g from fat? Would the latter lead to weight gain?

11 Replies (last)

The nutrient proportions are important for your health, 50% of fat is bad, for the weight loss only the calories are important. If you can eat 640cals in one go you eat to much, since there should be 3 meals a day +2 snacks. Portion size control is also important in a diet.

thanks for your reply. 

that makes a lot of sense. i saved half the sandwich for dinner, and may go lifting sometimes later tonight

Though I don't know your stats, I would say not to take that other poster's advice too much to heart.  I eat three non-equally sized meals a day and I can most certainly eat 600+ calories at a time.  And I do. It doesn't at all mean that I'm eating too much, and it probably doesn't mean you are, either.  So I'd say take that advice with a grain of salt.  It's just a recipe for making you feel bad about yourself, I think.  You probably know what your calorie targets are, and know how much you should be eating.  If you track, you'll lose.  Even with an occasional 650 calorie meal.  Just listen to your body.

As for fat... do you track your calories here on CC?  if so, at the end of the day it will tell you what percentage of your daily calories you get from fat.  Me?  I tend to be on the high-ish end of the scale, usually about 30% and even up to 40% of my diet coming from fat.  But since I tend to eat healthy fats like olive oil, etc., I don't sweat it too much.  Others will tell you different things.  50% of your daily calories from fat sounds to me like too much.  Maybe shoot for 20-30 (healthy fats when possible) and see how you do.

Good luck!

It may not lead to extra weight gain, but it sure won't be as filling.  Fat is very calorie dense.  For example, one tablespoon of butter is 100 calories.  So your 600 calorie "meal" could be as little as 6 tablespoons of butter.

Compare that to your sandwich.  Which one do you think is going to keep you full longer?  Heck, an entire footlong Subway chicken breast sub is only about 650 calories, I think.  Speaking of that, a footlong chicken breast sandwich has 10g of fat, or 16% of your RDA.  Where did you get 50% from?  Maybe you should look at the ingredients of your sandwich?

Plus, fat has relatively few nutrients (vitamins, minerals, etc).  So doing that consistently wouldn't be healthy, even if you could do it.

Clint

Dietary fat does not equal body fat.   Meaning that just because you are eating a higher fat diet does not mean that fat is going to stick to your thighs or gut.  If you exceed the calories that you burn in a day,  you will gain weight, doesn't matter if those calories come from fat, carbs or protein.  Keep good track of how many calories you burn in a day, and try to maintain a calorie deficit. 

Like Pbear999 said,  fat is very calorie dense.  9 calories for ever gram of fat,  compared to 4 calories per gram of carbs or protein.  So higher fat foods are generally going to be much higher in calories

Do a search on macronutrient ratios.   This will give you a good idea on what proportion of fat, carbs and protein you should be taking in. 

 

Eating fat also takes virtually no extra energy, because it doesn't get broken down. It goes straight to storage. Whereas eating some (healthy) carbs and/or protein take a bit more energy because they have to go through the process of being broken down into glucose to use as energy before storing the excess as fat.

Original Post by ezzied:

Eating fat also takes virtually no extra energy, because it doesn't get broken down. It goes straight to storage. Whereas eating some (healthy) carbs and/or protein take a bit more energy because they have to go through the process of being broken down into glucose to use as energy before storing the excess as fat.

Completely wrong. If fat had no uses in the body, eating fat would not be necessary for health (and it is). Fat can and is broken down and used by the body. It does not go "straight to storage" unless you are eating more calories than you burn off - and that applies equally to carbs and protein too.

Eating fat does NOT make you fat. Eating more than you burn does.

In addition, fat provides satiety, keeping you fuller for longer.

Original Post by dkn:

The nutrient proportions are important for your health, 50% of fat is bad, for the weight loss only the calories are important. If you can eat 640cals in one go you eat to much, since there should be 3 meals a day +2 snacks. Portion size control is also important in a diet.

The OP was saying she has eaten 50% of her DV of fat, not that her diet consists of 50% fat. Therefore, the amount of fat she/he eating is perfectly fine, and in fact to get the recommended daily amount of fat she/he needs to consume another 50% of the DV. Most people seem to recommend getting somewhere between 20-30% of your daily calories from fat... if, for example, your diet is around 1500 calories then you would need between 300 - 450 calories from fat each day.

I do agree that only calories are important for weight loss; however 640 calories in one go is not excessive. You could easily eat a 640 calorie meal and still have room for 2 more smaller meals and 2 snacks.

To answer the question "what is the difference between a 600 cal meal with 0 fat and a 600cal meal with 200 fat cals" - my answer would be this:

The latter meal (containing fat) is more balanced. Fat , despite how much bad press it gets, is a vital nutrient. It provides satiety and also has numerous functions to play in the body; maintaining healthy hair, skin and nails, forming cell membranes, carrying the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, enhancing calcium absorption, reducing your risk of heart disease (the heart is actually protected by a layer of saturated fats) and enhancing the immune system... Among other things. So don't be afraid of fats - you need them for good health.

I also note you said "a 600 calorie meal containing 200g from fat." Not sure if that was just a typo but remember that 200 fat calories is not the same as 200g of fat. Fat has 9 calories per gram, so 200 fat calories = 22.2g of fat, or about 4 teaspoons worth.

http://www.westonaprice.org/knowyourfats/skin ny.html

What's the difference between a 600 calorie meal with 0g from fat vs a 600 calorie meal with 200g from fat? Would the latter lead to weight gain?

 

 Assuming you're burning more calories than you're taking in, there would be no difference between those two meals in terms of weight loss.  However, there are two major nutritional differences:

1. As Meryl said, the one with 200 of its 600 calories from fat is more balanced and better for you.

2. The meal with fat will keep you feeling full and satisfied MUCH longer than the meal without fat.  This is really important; it's your body telling you that it likes having a balanced meal with some fat in it.

Original Post by corvuscorax:

What's the difference between a 600 calorie meal with 0g from fat vs a 600 calorie meal with 200g from fat? Would the latter lead to weight gain?

 

 Assuming you're burning more calories than you're taking in, there would be no difference between those two meals in terms of weight loss. 

 Actually, you'd probably lose more weight/fat on the higher fat meal (source)

yeah, the Atkins diet is a high fat diet. But you eat less calories overall.

There was debate as to whether high fat is bad for you and I've read several places that a low caloric, high fat diet isn't any worse for you than any other low caloric diet.

Someone said fat calories are in small in portions so you eat smaller amounts for the same calories. But it still can satiate you.  I can eat a small steak ONLY and not be hungry.

In fact I went on a hamburger diet and lost 50 pounds. Of course the nutrition wasn't there.

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