Weight Loss
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Does exercise before a weigh-in increase your weight??


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I have final weigh in for a Biggest Loser challenge at my job tomorrow. A co-worker of mine and former BL winner said that exercising right before the weigh in will actually increase my weight on the scale. Does anyone know if this is true? I am already working out regularly and my plan was to get an additional run in an hour or so before weigh-in.

Please share!

14 Replies (last)

For me it does-I think I remember someone saying that after a workout your muscles hang onto water

It depends.  If you sweat a bunch of water out, then it would go down, but if you rehydrate then it might go up.

#3  
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For me it definitely does. I used to be really desperate to see a good number on the scale I won't exercise the day before sometimes even two days before. Now I don't really care as long as it comes off eventually. I even found that if I exercised for one week I'd have a low number but then if I took a week off exercise the following week I'd have a high loss. The body works in mysterious ways!!

#4  
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On the biggest loser show, when do they do their last chance workout? How many days before?

That's a good question. I'm not sure.

Yeah, I wouldn't normally care. But this is the final weigh in so I do careWink

#7  
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Hi,

I think if you do cardio you dehydrate so you weight less. If you do weights you bulk up.

I think they do last chance training about 6 hours before weigh in. I also knew that they dont drink as much water as any other day in weigh in day, only the basic. 

Not that it increases your weight, but it will be unrealistic. You will be sweating and losing water weight, which makes anyone feel good when they step on the scale and see a smaller number. I weigh in once a week at the same time of day (5 am before my workout) with the exact same clothes on as each previous time. Weigh-ins should be as consistent as possible. If you weigh after your workout, you will not be consistent in EXACTLY how many calories you burned, how much water weight you lost, etc.

Unless you chug a bunch of water afterward, there is absolutely no way your weight would be higher after exercising as compared to before exercising.

I've tried it a few times to satisfy curiosity. I weighed the same before and after workout and that was after some pretty extreme cardio. The only thing that's ever changed a weigh in for me was waste retention. It helps to be regular.

#11  
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What arman said. It is physically impossible to gain mass immediately after working out, unless you drink a bunch of water; that's what weighs you down after a workout. If anything you're losing water, so you should weigh less.

I weighed myself before a midsummer's 4 miler a few years back (90°F, 90% RH). I lost 4 lbs in 40 minutes (starting weight 222 lb, so 1.8%). Then I drank a bunch of water, and after dinner I weighed 225 lb. So time it right and you'll be all set.

#13  
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so heres what you do

exercise before - you will lose the water weight and a bit more by burning the calories.  dont rehydrate or eat  before you weight in - this is what wrestlers do all the time - after weigh ins go for it

if you weigh yourself right after a workout and then drink a 16 oz water you will gain one pound back per the scale - longterm thats not teh answer for all the obvious reasons but short term its out-ins = loss

I would make a date with a dry sauna, rather than a routine.  The lactic build up during exercise without hydration stresses the kidneys.  Fast and a hot box for a couple hours about an hour before weigh in.  Iv'e seen people lose ten lbs in a day and a half, but its gruelling and borderline dangerous at that extreme.  The fighter is literally on his knees begging to get out of the hot box.

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