Weight Loss
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Exercising, eating right, weight won't come off!


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Facts:  I'm 5'5", female, medium bone structure.  Three years ago, I was 160 lbs.  It was the highest I'd ever been.  I'm 5'5", female.  I'd typically weighed 130 before that.  That weight gain was entirely due to not exercising and not paying any attention to what or how much I was eating.

It took me about a 1.5 years, but I was able to get down to 135.  Part-way through my journey, I stalled, at about 150, for months.  I was exercising 1 hour a day (weights + cardio), 4 days a week.  Finally, I started incorporating weight watchers principles and doing interval training twice a week, and the weight finally started coming off.  On the WW points system, I ate about 25-30 points a day (taking into account my exercise), and I went from eating lots of fruit and almost no veggies to eating almost no fruit and eating lots of veggies.

I also bought an HRM and found I was burning 700-1000 cals a workout (1.5 hrs, 4 times a week).  I did nothing to really significantly increase my caloric intake then, so still eating 25-30 points, WW style.

In the past few months, though, I started dropping my workout caloric burn to about 500-600 a workout, again, not changing eating habits, though I'd also stopped logging every bite I took because I was becoming overly obsessive about it.  Things were stabilized - I went up to 140 when I stopped tracking my food, but I was happy. 

Then I stopped weighing myself and only caring about my clothes; maintained exercise levels and eating style.  I was burning about 500-600 cals a workout, 1 hr a day, 4 days a week, cardio + weights.

A few months ago, I started GAINING weight.  I had changed nothing in eating or exercise.  Once my jeans quit fitting, I went back to burning 800-1000 cals a workout, 1.5 hrs, 4 times a week, and KEPT GAINING.  I started tracking my foods again, found I was actually eating about 1100 some days; typically 1400 cals a day.  So, I started trying to increase a bit on the eating, decrease on the exercising, but I kept gaining. 

I'm now at 157.  I tried stopping the workouts altogether, but I get edgy if I don't exercise.  So, just the past couple of days, I've only done a half hour workout - circuit training, but about half an hour.  My HRM yesterday said for my 30 minutes circuit training and 10 min pilates, I burned 400 cals.  I'm starting to log my foods again.  Three weeks ago, I weighed in at 153.  So even with limiting intake again and working out, or stopping working out and trying not to worry about intake, or stopping workout out and eating more, I gained 4 pounds.

I'm going to be seeing a doctor, but past blood tests have all shown "nothing's wrong."  I'm pretty sure that will be the case again.  So - why do I keep GAINING?  I've stayed active, have only may introduced a bit more sugar (work team thrives on it, but I limit my intake - maybe half a cupcake or a single piece of chocolate instead of a whole cupcake and nonstop choc., etc.). 

Any ideas what might be going on?  Is it possible my metabolism is completely shot?  I did a 23-mile bike ride last week, no problem.  So I think my fitness level is there, but it's awfully frustrating to start seeing the scale creep UP.

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I'm in the same boat, same frame, and can't get under 160. I'm blaming age --since I am over 40 now.

I exercise, eat right and nothing.

I'm going to start taking Kelp, I hear it reves up the thyroid although my doctor insists mine is o.k. - I don't believe it. How can a person exercise an hour a day 6 times a week and eat well not lose weight?

Hey there, sorry to hear about your situation.

Although I am not a nutritional expert here are a few things you might like to try:

Not eating enough can slow your metabolism down lots so try to stick above 1200 calories each day, if your exercising plenty this number should be higher. If the body is worried that it is being starved then it holds onto fat as a reserve energy source as much as possible.

Eat some metabolism boosting foods. I find the easiest to incorporate are lemon water in the morning, garlic, ginger and chillies in sauces, cinnamon in porridge. There are lots of others though if you research it.

 Try the supplement chromium picolinate; it’s really good at killing cravings for foods that are useless to you.

With regards to eating chocolate, I really think it just induces more cravings for fatty and sugary foods. If you are going to eat it then dark chocolate is the only option, aim for 70% cocoa solids. Sometimes you would get a craving for chocolate when blood sugar levels are down, I think its much more beneficial to eat a little bit of fruit or a couple of really chewy sweets like fruit gums instead.

Also, I don’t know about your eating patterns but to boost metabolism it’s often a good idea to eat about 6 smaller meals throughout the day, it keeps the metabolism ticking over.

Finally, this idea is a bit extreme but it was proposed to me by a nutritionist so it might be helpful: cut up small cubes of cucumber, celery and carrot in one pot, then 1cm squared cubes of chicken in another pot and have a veggie square every 15 mins and then on the hour have a chicken square. I could never be bothered to do it to see if it worked but I suppose the idea is to keep your metabolism running at a higher rate so when you do eat a meal it gets processed quicker.

Sorry that this is quite the rant, I hope some of it is a little bit helpful and sorry if any of it seems really obvious.

Good luck

 

Hi Zoeyjohn

Ive been in the same boat as you before... when you go and see your doctor ask them if they will include checking your cortisol levels if they run a series of blood tests.  My cortisol levels were elevated and it made me put on weight and nothing would budge it.

Just a thought.  Hope things turn around for you soon! Smile

Original Post by madison58811779:

I'm in the same boat, same frame, and can't get under 160. I'm blaming age --since I am over 40 now.

I exercise, eat right and nothing.

I'm going to start taking Kelp, I hear it reves up the thyroid although my doctor insists mine is o.k. - I don't believe it. How can a person exercise an hour a day 6 times a week and eat well not lose weight?

 Same problem here, except I am 5'2" and stalled at 148 pounds. But I am only 19! Sad, eh? ;) My thyroid is also fine... It's so difficult not to give up like this.

Original Post by zoeyjohn:

 I've stayed active, have only may introduced a bit more sugar (work team thrives on it, but I limit my intake - maybe half a cupcake or a single piece of chocolate instead of a whole cupcake and nonstop choc., etc.). 

 

I think you answered your own question here. You said you lost when you concentrated on what you ate, lots of veggies not just how many calories. I'd suspect you're underestimating the number of calories you're eating in these treats. If the rest of your diet is 100% bang on then you can afford to blow 500 calories on a piece of cake once in a while, but not as a regular thing. Sugar messes with your insulin levels and if you eat enough of it can cause your body to store fat regardless of how many calories you consume.

#6  
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I hope you are still an active member and read this because i signed up to the whole site just to post this! I am not an advertiser, or a spammer, just someone who has been lucky enough to find an honest guide to practical, and moreover permanent, fat loss.

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go to www.burnthefat.com, download it, read it, do it

email me and let me know how you get on with it :)

best of luck, Ben

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