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Explain to me why you guys think whole grains are healthy.


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Enlighten me then, as to how our bodies deal with the extremely toxic stuff in whole grains, namely the:

-Virtually all carbs so it spikes your blood sugar like crazy.

-Abnormally high lectin content: (which renders any minerals and vitamins in the grain useless and undigestable by our bodies.) You might as well be drinking water because it adds the same amount of minerals. 

-Abnormally high phytic acid content: (which renders any minerals and vitamins in OUR bodies unusable and actually binds to them, leading to mineral loss. When you lose minerals, your body makes up the difference by leaching its own minerals into the body, which takes calcium away from your bones, zinc away from your testicles decreasing the amount of testosterone produced and the function of virtually every cell in the body, depression regulation, body temperature, blood alkalinity, breathing, etc. etc. etc. etc. that is associated with magnesium, copper, iron, cobalt, manganese, selenium and chromium. -

-Gluten: (causes Leaky Gut Syndrome/Irritable Bowel Syndrome, shreds your intestines, causes systemic immune response and chronic inflammation of the intestinal lining and stomach.) Contrary to popular belief, there is not one person on this planet that is gluten "tolerant." It just takes some people longer to get the negative cumulative effect because their bodies are in better condition than others.

 

Edited Jun 26 2011 13:14 by coach_k
Reason: locked pending moderator review
117 Replies (last)

No, "virtually all carbs" do not spike your blood sugar.  That's the point of whole grains: The fiber in the hulls (which are left intact) prevents them from being digested quickly so you don't get a sugar "dump" like you can with processed starches.

Gluten is only harmful to people who are intolerant of it.  It's harmless for the rest of us.

You've been reading too much carb-alarmist nonsense.  Carbohydrates are necessary to provide energy and prevent dehydration. 

Somebody's been reading nonsense online again.  Oh, and look...there's "leaky gut" again. :/

Original Post by tripolar1:

Somebody's been reading nonsense online again.  Oh, and look...there's "leaky gut" again. :/

 Ain't it grand? Some people maybe shouldn't have access to Wikipedia.

Yep, carbs are ebil. *munches carrot* Ebil.

Lectins, like anything, could be toxic if consumed in excess. Or to those with a sensitivity to them.

Actually...my answer stands for everything on your list. ^

OP: please provide links to credible peer reviewed research to back up your assertions.

#5  
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It's okay, this is also the person who said they lost 20 lbs overnight and had "leaky gut syndrome".  OP tell me then if it's so toxic and you have leaky gut syndrome like you said, were you eating a bunch of whole grains?  Sure seems like you knew about it but yet were still eating them maybe.  Troll Troll Troll Troll

Whole grains don't contain a magical nutrient that fights disease and improves health. It's the entire package—elements intact and working together—that's important. http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/w hat-should-you-eat/health-gains-from-whole-gr ains/index.html

Whole grains are better sources of fiber and other important nutrients, such as selenium, potassium and magnesium.  http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/whole-grains /NU00204

Older adults who eat whole grain foods instead of refined grain products may be at lower risk for health conditions that can lead to diabetes and heart disease. The study also found that older adults who choose whole grains have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than people who don't eat whole grains.  http://seniorliving.about.com/od/nutritionfor olderadults/a/whole_grains.htm

Epidemiological studies find that whole-grain intake is protective against cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity.    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12740067

Want more? http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=food spice&dbid=66

http://www.self.com/fooddiet/blogs/eatlikeme/ 2011/05/best-of-the-best-whole-grains.html

http://www.wethechange.com/why-whole-grains-s hould-be-a-staple-in-your-diet/

There you go. Lots of references from reputable sources.

^^Documentation win!

Mmmmm toxins , yummy. *Mixes dry oats and wheat germ into her yoghurt*

 

Enlighten me healthyhabit, what should we eat?

 

Not all carbs spike your blood sugar like a skyrocket. Whole grains are healthy because as soon as you ingest them, I bet you think - SPIKE! Which is exactly wrong. THAT happens with simple carbs, sugars, preserved hostess cupcakes. Not whole grains. 

 

As mentioned above, the fiber in whole grains literally STOPS the blood sugar from going sky high, so that the whole grain is slowly absorbed. Think of fiber like a weight. The more of it, the more "weights", the harder it is to lift, so you lift slowly. Having no weights such as white bread, you lift easily, and voila - quick and easy lift = sugar spike. Slow and steady lift = whole grains and fiber. 

Where does "abnormally high" come from?  Relative to what?  What are proposed "normal" levels of those nutrients?  Seems to me that whatever the plant produces naturally, is probably the right amount.  Unless you are suggesting that some sort of modern farming practice results in "abnormally high" levels of micronutrients.  

Can someone give me an example of an actual person with "leaky gut" or with "shredded intestines"?  

if there's any one food group that we're designed to eat, it's whole grains. not only can they provide all the nutrients necessary for health, they're readily available most of the year on most of the planet, plus they're easy to gather, store, and carry. whole grains are perfect.

This kind of post makes me dislike Wikipedia a little bit.

***goes to google "leaky gut"***

***laughs****

Sounds like another "catch all" diagnosis.

Wow...you grain lovers are not very nice. Ever since your government decided fats were bad for you and grains should be your primary sources of nutrition people have gotten fatter, sicker, and weaker. 

50 years of that evidence is enough to prove to me that grains are poisonous to people, but they are safe for birds and rodents.

I'd suggest that people try to keep a more open mind when it comes to grains and whole grains. A lot of the studies that people are referencing in support of whole grains are only comparing whole and refined grains - not questioning if we should be eating grains at all. Plus, epidemiological studies are virtually worthless when it comes to nutrition. There are just way too many confounding factors.

While leaky gut is still in the realm of pseudoscience, there are definite concerns with gluten (and similar grain-derived proteins) and gut health. A review in the American Journal of Gastroenterology has shown numerous links between irritable bowel syndrome and gluten sensitivity, and recent studies have shown that a slight majority of IBS patients experience improvement of symptoms with a gluten-free diet. I've suffered from IBS for close to 8 years now, and my own personal food elimination trials have confirmed that removing gluten from my diet is beneficial. Certainly, not everyone has IBS, but it is fairly common (around 15% of the US population) and prevalence has been increasing.

Plus, just because whole grains are not supposed to spike your blood sugar, it doesn't mean that it actually works that way for everyone. If I eat 350 calories of old fashioned oatmeal with milk for breakfast, I'm hungry within 2 hours and will start showing symptoms of hypoglycemia within 4. If I eat 350 calories of eggs and vegetables, I'm good for at least 5 hours, and don't experience hypoglycemia at all.

@pg - I would argue the exact opposite. Grains have only been a significant part of the human diet for about 10,000 years, which isn't too long in evolutionary terms. Dairy has been in the human diet for about as long, and many of us still lack the adaptation for lactose tolerance into adulthood. I think it's entirely plausible that we wouldn't be entirely adapted to grains either. They also don't even come close to providing all the nutrients necessary for good health: just off the top of my head, they are lacking omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

Original Post by sexy_greek:

Wow...you grain lovers are not very nice. Ever since your government decided fats were bad for you and grains should be your primary sources of nutrition people have gotten fatter, sicker, and weaker.

Don't assume that just because we aren't willing to demonize grains or carbs, that we demonize fat.

Some of us like a balanced diet that includes plenty of both (and we don't skimp on the protein either).

Original Post by amethystgirl:

Original Post by sexy_greek:

Wow...you grain lovers are not very nice. Ever since your government decided fats were bad for you and grains should be your primary sources of nutrition people have gotten fatter, sicker, and weaker.

Don't assume that just because we aren't willing to demonize grains or carbs, that we demonize fat.

Some of us like a balanced diet that includes plenty of both (and we don't skimp on the protein either).

I don't demonize carbs either, they should come from vegetable sources. 

Original Post by theholla:

@pg - I would argue the exact opposite. Grains have only been a significant part of the human diet for about 10,000 years, which isn't too long in evolutionary terms. Dairy has been in the human diet for about as long, and many of us still lack the adaptation for lactose tolerance into adulthood. I think it's entirely plausible that we wouldn't be entirely adapted to grains either. They also don't even come close to providing all the nutrients necessary for good health: just off the top of my head, they are lacking omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

how 'bout you re-read my post and then tell me how you would complete the sentence, "if there's any one food group we're designed to eat, it's..."

you're arguing a point (several, actually) that i never made, holla.

eta: speaking of 10,000 years, the idea that we should be getting every nutrient every day is very, very fresh.

Original Post by pgeorgian:

Original Post by theholla:

@pg - I would argue the exact opposite. Grains have only been a significant part of the human diet for about 10,000 years, which isn't too long in evolutionary terms. Dairy has been in the human diet for about as long, and many of us still lack the adaptation for lactose tolerance into adulthood. I think it's entirely plausible that we wouldn't be entirely adapted to grains either. They also don't even come close to providing all the nutrients necessary for good health: just off the top of my head, they are lacking omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

how 'bout you re-read my post and then tell me how you would complete the sentence, "if there's any one food group we're designed to eat, it's..."

you're arguing a point (several, actually) that i never made, holla.

eta: speaking of 10,000 years, the idea that we should be getting every nutrient every day is very, very fresh.

"if there's any one food group we're designed to eat, it's..." Meat

Original Post by sexy_greek:

Original Post by pgeorgian:

Original Post by theholla:

@pg - I would argue the exact opposite. Grains have only been a significant part of the human diet for about 10,000 years, which isn't too long in evolutionary terms. Dairy has been in the human diet for about as long, and many of us still lack the adaptation for lactose tolerance into adulthood. I think it's entirely plausible that we wouldn't be entirely adapted to grains either. They also don't even come close to providing all the nutrients necessary for good health: just off the top of my head, they are lacking omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

how 'bout you re-read my post and then tell me how you would complete the sentence, "if there's any one food group we're designed to eat, it's..."

you're arguing a point (several, actually) that i never made, holla.

eta: speaking of 10,000 years, the idea that we should be getting every nutrient every day is very, very fresh.

"if there's any one food group we're designed to eat, it's..." Meat

how do you figure?  There is a reason that the term "Hunter and Gatherer" came around.  What do you think they were gathering? My first thought is that you gather nuts and berries... which would be.... fats and carbs.

117 Replies (last)
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