Weight Loss
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Well, I've been mulling this over for a couple of days, did a little research, and then decided to ask you guys.

Both soluble and insoluble fiber are not digested by the body so do fiber grams have calories? If they don't, are the numbers reflected on the nutritional label? I'm only wondering because I eat a lot of fiber a day (up to 45grams) and if these calories don't count towards my intake, then I should be eating more.

Thanks for any input on this silly question.
Edited Oct 08 2007 06:16 by united2gether
Reason: released as a sticky thread after a few days
22 Replies (last)
All calories count. Period.

Yes, they count, however, you are doing SO great by eating 45 grams of fiber.  Without that, you would be eating many more calories, since it is that good fiber stuff that gives you that "I'm full" feeling. 

Keep up the good work!

Of course calories count. My question is, does fiber have calories even if we don't digest it?
i have to disagree. fiber calories are included in nutrition information, but only in come countries. In the us, it is legal to not put in fiber calories because they are not digestable. Therefore, they do not "count" as such. however, if you, like most people, tend to underestimate cals sightly, there is nothing wring with including them to create a "buffer zone"

Fiber falls into the Carbohydrate realm -- like sugars, it shares the same calorie count of 4 calories per gram

Edit:  but it is claimed that you burn 7 calories digesting every gram of fiber (IIRC--the lady with the Fiber 35 diet.)

it is a carb, but it is not digested. so, theoretically, you could eat 200 grams of fiber and go 800 cals over maintenance day after day and not gain weight. what it would do to your digestive system is another thing entirely though...
Thanks for the info--it's such a grey area. Oh well at least I know it's good for me no matter how many cals. : )
I am pretty sure they don't count, seeing as you can't digest them so they can't be converted to energy or fat. And I just checked the label of my Fiber 1 cereal. It is listed as 60 calories a serving, with 1 gram fat, 25g carbs including 14g fiber, and 2g protein. The only way the cereal could be 60 cal a serving is if they didn't count the fiber, otherwise it would be 117 cal a serving.
I have to say that this is a great question. Someone else on another thread made the point about a fiber cereal that Kelloggs makes. Sorry don't know if it was Fiber One or what, but the point is that the grams of carbs, proteins, and fat did not add up to the calories listed (as most people know fat grams have 9 calories, whereas protein and carbohydrates only have 4).

Anyway I went to the Kelloggs website to see what was up. They show the same figures as here on calorie-count. So I emailed them. And they replied saying that since fiber is not digested, they deduct the calories out according to the grams of fiber. Like if there are 4 grams of fiber, then they reduce the calories listed by 16.

I was truly amazed! And now I can notice it on all their cereals. Obviously the lower the fiber the less noticeable. Thanks for the info hockeygirl, I was kind of wondering if there was a law governing such things...

Great info! When the manufacturer removes calories on lables because the fiber is not digested.. that makes me a little uncomfortable.

I was blown away when hungry girl stated that food products can be up to 20% off by their serving size and calorie counts. I don't know if I can look at a 100 calorie pack the same again, knowing it could be 120 cals. Just bothers me :) 

I ate aprox 65 grams of fiber today, so does that mean I can eat some more? Because its TOM and my brain is hungry! jk, but wouldn't that be nice? 

ya... as for fiber one cereal, in canada calories are listed as 100 per half cut, in the us they're listed as 60. it's because in canada you have to count fiber calories and in the us you don't. it's kind of silly really.
Original Post by x17star17x:

Great info! When the manufacturer removes calories on lables because the fiber is not digested.. that makes me a little uncomfortable.

I was blown away when hungry girl stated that food products can be up to 20% off by their serving size and calorie counts. I don't know if I can look at a 100 calorie pack the same again, knowing it could be 120 cals. Just bothers me :) 

I ate aprox 65 grams of fiber today, so does that mean I can eat some more? Because its TOM and my brain is hungry! jk, but wouldn't that be nice? 

 how can you eat that much fibre? 65 grams wow... and how can you feel hungry after eating that much fibre?!

Original Post by vendetta001:

how can you eat that much fibre? 65 grams wow... and how can you feel hungry after eating that much fibre?!

 If all you eat is plants, this is easy to do.  In fact, I shoot for 75-100g of fiber per day.  I rarely ever do feel hungry and after I eat I'm completely full (but it's different than if I just ate a giant steak or something I'm full, but I'm also full of energy instead of weighed down and tired).   Oh and let's just say my bathroom breaks are much shorter and easier these days. :D

75-100g fiber/day is not highly recommended.  Where do you get nutrition advice?
First tell me how much fiber one should consume, where you heard that, and what will happen if you consume too much.
fibre helps with the digestive system, yes?
Calories break down like this

protein:  4 cal/gram

carbs:  4 cal/gram

fat:  9 cal/gram

There are no calories in fiber because you don't digest them.  Here's a good discussion on fiber from the American Heart Association: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml? identifier=4574
#18  
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I've recently started adding more fiber to my diet by reading labels and checking the fiber content, and on breads and such I make sure its over 3 grams per slice and I try to get the ones with double fiber.  Flatout wraps and thomas light english muffins have 9 grams which is a lot!, And of course I always have some sort of bran cereal.  If not for breakfast then as a snack.  Plus lots of oranges and apples and carrots and celery and broccoli.  Anyway, since I started doing that, I've been losing sometimes up to an extra pound a week.  So it's so worth it because you're almost always full and your calories stay low because most fibery foods have less calories like everyone's been saying.  Just keep your fiber content high, and count the calories listed, it makes it easier than trying to figure out the math of how many calories to subtract because of the fiber.  I like to eat the high fiber veggies as snacks right before meals so I'm never that hungry for meals, so I can eat the correct portion sizes without feeling deprived.  Just thought I'd add my experiences to the discussion!

Well, this article is a bit dusty now... but nevertheless great question and great answers. However, do you think there is a difference between soluble and insoluble fibre?

Original Post by mikelane:

First tell me how much fiber one should consume, where you heard that, and what will happen if you consume too much.

Too much fiber will interfere with the absorption of nutrients.

Iron in particular is one as well as many others.

 

70-100 grams of fiber is a massive amount and you will end up with malnutrition cosnuming that much over any period of time. In addition it may have permanent detrimental affect on your bowels and digestive system.

 

 

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