Weight Loss
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Is have a question.

I just began taking a thyroid hormone compound 12 days ago, and I lost 5 lbs overnight after about 3 days on it despite actually having an appetite for once in my life. A few days later, life got hectic and I neglected to eat regularly and reverted to my typical "Oops, I haven't eaten for 8 hours" state. I gained back all 5 pounds while eating less.

Uhm? Is this normal?

My weight has stabilized since I regained everything, and I've been eating not-so-regularly still...I'm wondering if eating more regularly (though I'm not quite sure how I'd do so) would help me to return to weight loss. 

I went from 130 to 170 lbs within a mere few months last year, which I now know to be the result of my recently-diagnosed hypothyroidism. I gained most of the weight on 1000+ calorie deficits. I tend to undereat and never overeat, and I'd maintained 120-130 lbs for 2 years, so the weight gain made no sense when it occurred. Now I don't know how to get rid of it. I'm 5'5ish, so I am overweight now...I really hate appearing to be a lazy glutton when I'm the exact opposite of that. :-/ I'd just like to be back in the "healthy weight" BMI range at this point!

 

Does anybody have any experience to share? Thanks so much!

6 Replies (last)

lol, I actually have a doctor's appt. later this afternoon to get my script refilled.

Yeah, when you first start the medication, it really messes with your weight, appetite, metabolism. I ate like a flippin' hog the first couple weeks and lost about six pounds. Couldn't help it. I'd eat a big meal, then my stomach would be attacking me an hour later.

Since being regularly medicated, though, I'm pretty well back to normal--well, a little better than normal since my thyroid isn't all haywire.

I just wish that my hair would come back...I used to have really thick, soft, straight hair. It was the one physical thing about me that I liked. Before I was diagnosed, my hair started thinning and getting frizzy and dull. It's slowly getting better, but...bleh.

Hey! Don't lose hope! I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism when I was about 6 months old, so I'm not sure I have the exact same experience...I was always a little bigger than my friends growing up, but when I was old enough to take my meds on my own, I wasn't very diligent about it, and gained weight all through my teens.  I have to be very conscious about taking my pills...When I don't my thyroid gets severely out of whack.  I get depression, my metabolism practically stops, I get constipated, I crave sweets and don't eat regularly, my hair falls out and gets extremely dull, my mind gets a little foggy, I get extremely cold...and the list goes on! it affects EVERYTHING! It feels like premenopause or something....without the hot flashes (cold flashes instead, actuallY)

Sometimes it takes a bit to get the right dosage of meds - for instance, after having my daughter...I had to get my dosage WAY increased, and it seems to be staying steady at an increased dosage...I was never able to decrease my dosage after having my daughter. 

I guess the most important thing to remember is that YES, YOU CAN have a healthy BMI again with the right dosage, but sometimes it takes awhile to figure it all out. Try to eat as healthily and as regularly as you can (sometimes life does get hectic and it's hard...) and don't give up - remember that hypothyroidism can make you feel very sluggish and lethargic and affects your mood as well, but if you force yourself to get in a little exercise everyday, it goes a long long way!

Good luck with your journey! :)

Make sure you keep track of your TSH levels too...One doctor was ok with keeping my TSH at 4.0-5.5 (up to 5.5 is considered normal), although I was still very symptomatic-miserable. Another doctor increased my dosage until the TSH was below 2.5. That's when I finally saw improvement. Felt SO much better all around and the scale stopped going up.

Just so you know, if you become pregnant the thyroid goes all haywire. The baby takes what it needs first, and if there is anything left then mom gets it. Not good when we are already hypo...It took a year to get regulated after having my daughter. Now my son is 4 months old and we are still working on it-labwork every 6 weeks.

Original Post by meghansmommy:

Make sure you keep track of your TSH levels too...One doctor was ok with keeping my TSH at 4.0-5.5 (up to 5.5 is considered normal), although I was still very symptomatic-miserable. Another doctor increased my dosage until the TSH was below 2.5. That's when I finally saw improvement. Felt SO much better all around and the scale stopped going up.

Just so you know, if you become pregnant the thyroid goes all haywire. The baby takes what it needs first, and if there is anything left then mom gets it. Not good when we are already hypo...It took a year to get regulated after having my daughter. Now my son is 4 months old and we are still working on it-labwork every 6 weeks.

 A VERY good point! I had to convince my doc that my THS levels were still too high (as I was still very symptomatic) and it was like pulling teeth for her to increase my meds.  Nice to see that I wasn't the only person who is STILL trying to regulate my thyroid hormones after pregnancy/ birth of my daughter.  It's been 2 years, now. Also having to get labwork every 6 weeks. :)

Thank you so much for your thoughtful replies and support!!!

Kotov - My hair has suddenly started coming back to life...I mostly noticed it after I began washing it on a daily basis rather than every other day. I don't know if you already wash yours every day, but it's something to try! I know the feeling of losing the one physical thing your appreciate about yourself...my legs used to be really toned and now they're flabby,  puffy and covered in cellulite. Only my calves have maintained minor definition. I'm also a huge cycling enthusiast, and it's really annoying to have my thighs scraping together while I ride. 

I'm glad that everything else is coming into order for you, though! That is marvelous! I'm sure that you're feeling much better now, too. :-)

Darwinsfrog - Your reply was really encouraging, thank you. I hope that having hypothyroidism for so long has at least made it slightly easier to deal with now that you're taking your medication regularly. The symptoms your described fit me to a T...it's so crazy when that happens, because one often feels all alone in the world! I've been taking my medication as directed without missing a dose...thankfully I haven't forgotten it! 

I eat very healthily (I'm also allergic to eggs, dairy, soy, peanuts, gluten, beef, lamb and pork), never eating processed foods, sugars, or refined foods. I consume a lot of vegetables and fruits and only drink water and tea. Most of my peers think that I'm crazy, because I've been eating this way since I was 13, and I'm now 17. I sincerely enjoy it, though!

I'm also a huge exerciser. Despite hypothyroidism making me tired, I'd exercise 2-3 hours per day 6-7 days a week. My doctor actually told me to reduce it a bit to put less stress on my body. He suggested 7 to 11 hours per week rather than 12 to 21 hours. I'm getting into triathlons, too...I just completed my first sprint tri last summer (again, all of my peers think that I'm crazy :-)).

Thanks so much to both of you for taking the time to write!

Thank you, too, meghansmommy and darwin, for that info! It's really difficult to find a doctor that will willingly check the thyroid in the first place, isn't it? I appreciate your reminder of keeping tabs on my levels. I have a folder containing every single test, form and paper that I have received/requested from my doctor. Thankfully, he became alarmed when my TSH was still in the "normal" range but my T3 was low. We tried a supplement at first, but my thyroid only worsened with that. He was hesitant to start me on a medication before finding the underlying cause of my hypothyroidism (I have symptoms and lab results indicating other issues), but he quickly agreed to do so when my mom asked him to after I began getting suicidally depressed. I am comfortable with my doctor, so I will be sure to mention it if he is keeping my levels too low.

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