Weight Loss
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Weight Loss for the Disabled


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Hi all,

I am new to calorie count. I am a disabled college student and trying to loss weight to get in a healthy range. I can't do much exercise since my disability (Muscular Dystrophy) prevents effective workout. I am trying to loss weight based on calorie restriction. There are not many books that are geared for weight loss for the disabled. Most preach diet AND exercise and calorie intake is designed for some type of execise even if it is WALKING around the house.

Can anyone suggest any good books that focus mostly on diet and foods selection that would promote weight loss without exercise?

Thanks

Edited Jun 04 2008 04:21 by nycgirl
Reason: 5/27/08: Stickied. 6/3/08: Unstickied
23 Replies (last)
#1  
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I'm a wheelchair used and managed to lose 5 stone by doing shadow boxing, cardio with weights and of course, weight lifting itself.

I'm not too knowledgeable about your condition but if you can do anything like that then you would be on your way.

Basically any exercise that would get your heart rate up would burn fat, it doesn't even have to be traditional cardio exercise.

I have cerebral palsy, so, though I can walk for ex., it is slow, painful, and something I do not enjoy. I guess my main suggestion for you would be to try Atkins - but talk to your doc first. I know lots of sedentary TABs (Temporarily Able-Bodied, if you didn't know) who have lost weight on this diet.


Good luck!!

Your caloric intake should be adjusted to match your calories expended.  In a sense, this creates a problem for people are not able to boost their calorie output by exercising.  You have no choice but to reduce the amount and types of food that you eat.  In my experience as a deskbound engineer, this is really a matter of recognizing the realities and making the necessary adjustments.

We are told that we need 2000 to 2500 calories per day -- and a lot of us end up turning that into 3000 to 3500 calories per day, which leads to an expanding waistline.  However, it seems likely that this requirement is overstated.  There is a growing body of evidence that restricting the nominal diet to 1500 to 2000 calories has significant health benefits.

There is nothing really magical about the diet.  You can eat almost anything.  You have to limit how much you eat -- and that take some getting used to.

I don't know if you've heard of this or if it will work for you, but a friend of the family has several problems and should not walk at all (but does minimally).  Anyway, she got into hydrotherapy at the local college.  It's specifically for people who need it, I think.  But, it allows a workout without lower needs.  And if you fall, it's only water, so I've been told =)

I feel you.  I have very bad arthritis and while there are periods of the year I am fine and can kickbox and do yoga, there are also large chunks I am bedbound.  It's very frustrating and makes my weight yoyo even if I don't change my diet just because my metabolism does a huge "WTF".

Can you do any kind of exercise at all? I mean even just walking an extra few minutes per day, shadow boxing, lifting small weights (even 2.5-5lbs is GREAT).

Hi, I'm with jc343 on restricting caloric intake. You and your doctor will know how much or if any exercise is possible.

Use this site to plan your meals: use the food log to log foods in advance, choose only "A" and "B" foods, and choose a low calorie goal--mine is 1750--my goal. Also, if you choose foods that are "not so great", the food suggestions will come back with little bitty changes you can make, one day at a time, to try to bring better food into your diet.

My actual intake is more sometimes more than 2000 by a little. But this is such a vast improvement, that I can feel the difference after only a few weeks.

I find the supportive comments and encouragement throughout these forums to be a wonderful addition to my program. It gives me the motivation to keep on trying, as well as the tools.

Hello! I'm disabled as well. I have Degnerative Discs in the lower back and nerve damage that makes my left leg throb when I walk too much. So there's not much I can do either.

I lift an 8 lb weight, and do modified crunches (sitting on the couch!), and other exercises I make up that actually work! 

I also eat only  the "A" and "B" foods, it helps alot. My weight loss is slow, but at least I'll keep it off when I'm through. It's taken me 7 months to lose 53 lbs.

Good luck on your journey to a healthier and happier you! :D

Since you're in college you might want to contact your school's kinesiology or physiotherapy department (or even the phys ed department or the school gym) - their students are supposed to be being creative about finding ways past restrictions to exercise.

Hi! I came on here to post about something similar:) I have Reflex Sympathetic Dystropy (www.rsdhope.org) which basically means my entire body is in extreme pain all the time, along with several other symptoms. I can not move at all without pain, so exercising is out of the question for me. I've been trying to figure out how many calories my body needs in a day. Since I don't move at all, none of the calculator things apply to me. I'm 5'9 and weigh about 185. I'm tryin to lose weight. Right now I'm eating between 800 and 1000 calories a day on a vegan diet but not losing any weight. Does anyone know how I can find out how many calories I need to eat to lose weight?

blumarker- I think my old physical therapist knows of some books that could help you, I'll ask her and let you know what I find out. Basically stick to whole foods, like fruits, vegetables, lean protein, and whole grains. When I write back to you, I'll give you a list of sites I know of that focus on that. Good luck!!!

I've successfully lost 25 pounds (and maintained the loss!) using calorie watching only. It wasn't that I can't exercise, but I knew that I needed to learn about eating better and it was easier for me to focus on just changing one set of behaviors rather than two. One book I found extremely useful was the Beck Diet Solution. I think it might mention exercise to some degree, but primarily focuses on eating habits. I used many of the instructions in that book, along with logging my calories daily, here online.

I also have RSD full body, I was doing sweat to the oldies, but now the pain is so bad its getting very hard to do, I did lose weight from 240 to 200 but have gained 16 back, this is just terrible. I want to lose it again and more, but you know when one hurts sometimes I turn to food. I have learned to move out of the kitchen so I'm not tempted to give in.

Hope you have a low pain day.

 

#12  
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Hi, blumarker, welcome to CC!

There's a number of us dealing with the challenge of eating right and moving toward a healthy weight in spite of physical disabilities.  So take heart--it can be done!

Less activity means fewer calories burned, which means you have fewer calories to work with, so you have to make them count. (no pun intended! :))  As others have said, aim for quality foods.  Be a little careful about relying solely on the 'grading' system that CC uses, though--it seems to be a work in progress.

There are no quick shortcuts here.  The minimum number of calories you need in order to get all the different nutrients your body needs is likely close to the number of calories you're burning each day.  Consistently burning even a little bit more than you take in WILL have results, but be ready for it to take time.

I found that thinking in terms of lifestyle changes (not dieting) and planning in terms of years rather than weeks or months has helped me to not get discouraged.  Also, you can give yourself lots of opportunities feel positive about your progress by charting non-scale successes like hitting your daily goal for protein, fibre, veggies, movement, etc.

If you can manage it, and it's available, water excercises are great.  Our rec centre used to run a class specifically for people with mobility issues.  (None of this 'push yourself', 'come on, you can do one more' stuff that might work for able bodied people but is counterproductive for the rest of us!) 

It was a lot of fun and we all ended up with increased strength and range of movement without it being torture. :)  If you can manage it, riding a pool noodle like a horse and cycling around the pool is worlds different from trying to walk on land.  One of our favourite instructors ever was a university kinesiology student.

Hope this helps!

Hi, I'm new here. I saw this and was hoping for some help.

I'm disabled with Erb's Palsy and can not use my right arm at all among other things. Most exercises that I've found I require to lose weight use both arms and I was wondering if there were places to go or people to talk to that have found ways around this. I'm much too large to do most exercises single handed (push-ups and the like) and though I use weights and resistance bands, I'm not getting anywhere. I have been trying for a very long time to lose a significant amount of weight. I have even gone through an anorexic phase that took hospitalization to pull out of. I am desperate to just be healthy.

The rule of thumb is 10 calories per pound per day for maintenance of basic metabolism, i. e. the body at rest.  To keep your body at its basic, you would need about 1850 calories based on current weight.  However, you probably want to lose weight and get more towards 145 lbs.  That would mean limiting your calories to 1450, for a loss of 400 calories a day, or about a pound every 9 days or so.  It would be slow, but you do have some obstacles.

 

Hi Blumarker! I think that the less you stress over exercising the better, in your case!

People have lost weight without added exercise, and you can do it too.

Insrtead, really focus on finding a diet that will work for you (one which you can live with for a long time, and will mean a lifestyle change.)

Many who've tried low-carb diets like Atkins have had initial success, but slow down, over time, and then come to a standstill, even gaining weight back again.

The folks who recommend calorie-counting with a more balanced diet, seem, over the long haul, to have wonderful success -- eveb though it's slow-going!

In old-fashioned terms, it means "sensible eating" with careful portion control, and finding a way to make it all fun -- many of us keep journals to record the changes we're going through, and of course, you have Calorie Count for all kinds of positive support in the blogs and forums.

Experiment with several diet plans -- there are oodles of them!  You can lose the weight using ciet changes alone. 

Love, and prayers for your success! Laughing

Original Post by momof2funykds:

Hello! I'm disabled as well. I have Degnerative Discs in the lower back and nerve damage that makes my left leg throb when I walk too much. So there's not much I can do either.

I lift an 8 lb weight, and do modified crunches (sitting on the couch!), and other exercises I make up that actually work! 

I also eat only  the "A" and "B" foods, it helps alot. My weight loss is slow, but at least I'll keep it off when I'm through. It's taken me 7 months to lose 53 lbs.

Good luck on your journey to a healthier and happier you! :D

Hello, I'm disabled as well with degenerative osteoarthritis of the spine with bone spurts. My back aches all the time....I am so afraid of falling again, that I don't go outside much. Besides my back problem I also have several other problems, like arthritis in my knees, fingers, shoulders etc. I have a lot of allergies also. Going outside to walk is almost impossible. Although I do once in a while, but it has to be a very calm day with no wind and no smoke in the air. I also have diabetes. 

I use CC to log my food choices. I still have a long way to go, but with the inspiration of all of you here on CC I know I can do it. We all need support and I'm willing to support anyone who needs it. I know I need support. 

 

#17  
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    Hi - I think it is great that you want to lose weight.  I want to tell
you about how I lost 70 pounds - exercise had very little to do with it - it
might have made it go faster, but I am limited since I have Multiple
Sclerosis!

     I went on TAKE SHAPE FOR LIFE (http://www.tsfl.com/index.jsp) it is a
medifast program.  It is restrictive, but I was VERY determined. I had a
wonderful coach who kept encouraging me.  I have kept the weight off now for
eleven months.  Take a look at the program - it might work very well for you
too!

#18  
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Hello,

I have COPD which really limits me as far as exercise is concerned. I'm also 71 years old, so I'm not really up to much exercise. Nevertheless, in the last year I have lost 50 pounds by counting calories. I was at 1500 calories per day until I reached my goal of 185 pounds (I'm 6'-2" tall). Now I am uping my calorie goal to 2000 and am having trouble eating that much in a day. I am just too used to eating a lesser amount.

It can be done with diet alone. It just takes will power. I did use My Fitness Pal on my doctor's advise. I still use it to be sure I am eating enough.

Good luck!

Original Post by webb22851:

Hello,

I have COPD which really limits me as far as exercise is concerned. I'm also 71 years old, so I'm not really up to much exercise. Nevertheless, in the last year I have lost 50 pounds by counting calories. I was at 1500 calories per day until I reached my goal of 185 pounds (I'm 6'-2" tall). Now I am uping my calorie goal to 2000 and am having trouble eating that much in a day. I am just too used to eating a lesser amount.

It can be done with diet alone. It just takes will power. I did use My Fitness Pal on my doctor's advise. I still use it to be sure I am eating enough.

Good luck!

Hi. What is My Fitness Pal? Please elaborate. And by the way, I'm not up to much exercise neither. I'm 65 and have been heavy for years. 

#20  
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Hi,  My Fitness Pal is an ap that you can get for your smart phone or on your computer.

www.myfitnesspal.com

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