Weight Loss
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For weight loss.....shrimp or scallops?


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I am in the process of losing weight.... 

i am NOT much of a fish eater so I'm trying to add some sort of seafood to my diet.

First question....

How many times a week would be acceptable to eat shrimp and/or scallops?  (No butter)

Which of the 2 has less fat/calories/cholesterol?
My cholesterol is perfect (finally YAY!) and I'm wondering if this sort of seafood would be ok to eat more than 1 time per week.

 

Any thoughts please???

~H~

4 Replies (last)
Calorie & fat wise, they are about the same, but shrimp is really high in cholesterol. I would go with the scallops.

I don't know how many times it is ok to eat a week.
#2  
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I include both in my diet.  If you like them both it just gives you options!  I eat them a few times a week.

Scallops are wonderful and you can eat them as often as you like.  They're on the Oceans Alive friendly list too.

Shrimp do have a lot of cholesterol, but unless you're one of the 10-15% affected by dietary cholesterol, this won't really matter.  85-90% of people who have high cholesterol have it because of genetics, not what they eat.  Even still, you could have shrimp at least once a week.  Just like they used to say don't eat eggs and now they say that eggs are OK.

On this web-site, you can get the information about calories; the ratings for each of these (and why one is better than the other). 

If you spray your pan witih olive oil SPRAY, you can do the shrimp beautifully - with a few herbs, and lemon juice so you can enjoy this way.

Shrimp Cocktail is delicious; the tomato-based cocktail sauce has horseradish - both of which are good for you.  Low in calories; enjoy this 3X/week.

Scallops are great done with the olive oil SPRAY; browned on each side (make sure they get a nice browning), then I pour in 4 ounces of WHITE wine; cover, and simmer until tender.  If you serve with yams (not candied); spinach (with lemon juice), you'll find this a good meal.  Also, the DIVER'S scallops are the ones to choose because they are large; you can make a meal out of just one!  The smaller scallops are difficult to 'brown'  without drying out.  I use the smaller scallops in my seafood stew.  Essentially you make up a tomato-based soup with tomatoes, chicken stock, and herbs.  Once you have it seasoned to your liking, your start 'dumping' your favorite fishes into it; buy a variety (around 5 at least), and in 1/3 to 1/2 pound measurements for EACH fish you want to add.

I like to add celery (cubed; including the stalks).  You can add little RED potatoes with the SKINS LEFT ON, and if you like, add a package of Lipton's Onion Soup Mix for a bit of a 'kick'.

I usually add in string beans (fresh); corn (fresh) AFTER we've had our first day's meal without the vegetable additions.  The stew makes a huge batch;we 'deplete' the batch, and then I add vegetables for the next go-round.  I usually end up freezing 1/3 to 1/2 of the batch I make - it keeps so well, and believe it or not this soup is great CHILLED. 

If your budget doesn't allow for the five DIFFERENT kinds of seafood, then pick at least TWO - scallop can be expensive, as can shrimp.  You can get a nice cod - chunk it up; add it with 1/2# of salmon and 1/2# of shark or Ahi tuna.  Usually the small scallops are nominally priced.

If you make up clam chowder on a periodic basis, replace the clams with the small scallops for a nice change of pace.  Toss in a can of whole-kernel corn (or fresh/frozen), and it's delicious. 

We just finished a 'dish' I make up using medium-sized shrimp; oysters, mushrooms, diced celery, zucchini squash - all prepared with an 'Asian' influence (as it pertains to the spices/herbs); the first round was over brown rice.  I turned what remained, into a tomato-based 'soup'/chowder, and it was delicious.

I've found the trick to eating LESS, is to use plenty of herbs; flavor is important.  Another is texture, and green peppers and celery as well as carrots will give you that texture we all tend to seek in foods.  I use chicken broth so much; it has virtually no calories, and while it has a high sodium content, we never eat so much of it that it becomes a problem.  I use orange juice with chicken broth; add some white wine (very dry), and you get a nice citrus overtone with whatever you add to this combination (stew or soup).

I solved my digestive problems by adding soup on a frequent basis; it doesn't foul up my system.  I use tomatoes all the time; they are so easy to use to bring out the flavors of a stew; soup, casserole - not just for 'pasta dishes' alone.

I think shrimp and tomatoes go great together.  Scallops and white wine with a hint of orange juice are a good combination.

When you want to add some 'kick' without salt, use a tiny amount of curry and/or a tiny amount of horseradish - clears your sinus, and puts a 'zing' in your soups and stews.

Oh yes, while NOT ON THE SUBJECT:  I like cold, chilled coffee.  I love tonic water.  I got the idea to make up a highly concentrated coffee; chilled it, and then REDUCED it with diet tonic water.  What fun - it bubbles in my nose, and it's a no calorie drink that's not expensive.

Guess I've rambled on enough; get used to having fish NOT FRIED - once you learn to love the varieties of flavors in their 'natural state', you'll probably never order any fish fried again (at least we don't).

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