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Whole wheat vs. whole grains


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So I've been trying to count my calories and pick better choices of foods in order to lose weight in a healthy way.  One of my favorite things to eat is bread, especially bagels.  So recently bought some whole wheat mini bagels for when I have a craving.  I know they are a better choice then regular or flavored bagels but am I still consuming good carbs?  I haven't really seen any whole grain bagels but I was wondering if they are still good to eat from time to time or is it just as bad as white bread in the sense that it will take longer to burn off because they are refined carbs?

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Yes, you're still consuming carbs, but they're good carbs; you need them to live. Whole grain and whole wheat mean the same thing; wheat is a grain.

Whole wheat is a type of whole grain. Brown rice is a whole grain. Rolled oats for oatmeal are whole grain. You get the idea.

Whole grains tend to be "better" carbs because they are more complex and they they tend to be higher in fiber. As long as your bagel eating doesn't throw you way off balance with the types of food you need to eat or push you way over the top of your calorie goal enjoy your whole wheat or some other whole grain bagel.

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Original Post by hopeful_:

Yes, you're still consuming carbs, but they're good carbs; you need them to live. Whole grain and whole wheat mean the same thing; wheat is a grain.

This is not true at all.  There is very little difference between white and whole wheat bread.  Both are heavily refined.

The way to tell the difference is the fiber content.  Whole grain bread should have at least 5 grams of fiber per 100 calories (give or take).  White and whole wheat generally have 1 gram or less, unless they're the kind where fiber is added (which is not good IMO).

Make sure the product is labeled 100 % whole wheat or 100% whole grain.

Original Post by andreams:

Original Post by hopeful_:

Yes, you're still consuming carbs, but they're good carbs; you need them to live. Whole grain and whole wheat mean the same thing; wheat is a grain.

This is not true at all.  There is very little difference between white and whole wheat bread.  Both are heavily refined.

The way to tell the difference is the fiber content.  Whole grain bread should have at least 5 grams of fiber per 100 calories (give or take).  White and whole wheat generally have 1 gram or less, unless they're the kind where fiber is added (which is not good IMO).

Unless your country has very odd labeling laws, this is untrue.  "Brown" bread is as processed as white bread.  "Whole wheat" bread has to be made with whole wheat flour.  If you want to be really sure, buy the kind called "100% whole wheat" and it cannot contain any white flour. 

Original Post by susiecue:

Original Post by andreams:

Original Post by hopeful_:

Yes, you're still consuming carbs, but they're good carbs; you need them to live. Whole grain and whole wheat mean the same thing; wheat is a grain.

This is not true at all.  There is very little difference between white and whole wheat bread.  Both are heavily refined.

The way to tell the difference is the fiber content.  Whole grain bread should have at least 5 grams of fiber per 100 calories (give or take).  White and whole wheat generally have 1 gram or less, unless they're the kind where fiber is added (which is not good IMO).

Unless your country has very odd labeling laws, this is untrue.  "Brown" bread is as processed as white bread.  "Whole wheat" bread has to be made with whole wheat flour.  If you want to be really sure, buy the kind called "100% whole wheat" and it cannot contain any white flour. 

 White flour is from processed whole wheat.  Which means all of the "wholeness" has been processed out of eat.  Your aim should be for 100% whole grain.  Look at the fiber content. More than 5 grams of fiber per serving should be your goal.

After going through about 15 different types of bread at the grocery store reading label after label I shook my head and just bought the Ezekial stuff, I was too tired to keep reading all of the same ingredients.   I used to hate this (Ezekial) bread untill I completely weaned myself off of white flours and the like.  Now I love this hearty chewy bread.  It helps if you warm it up some.

Not all "brown" bread are created equal.

 

Thanx for all the info everyone it was very helpful.

well,  you might read this. It's got everything you would want to know and it's well written.

amy, awesome article! I wonder though why Orowheat is so different in texture than Ezekial breads? 

Original Post by lonestar45:White flour is from processed whole wheat.  Which means all of the "wholeness" has been processed out of eat. 

If they process out the "wholeness", they're not allowed to call it "whole wheat flour" anymore.  It's just "wheat flour" (or "enriched wheat flour").  I look for both fibre content and protein content in my bread, and any brand called "100% whole wheat" has done fine by those tests.  Again, this may vary by country.

I also love grainy seedy dense multigrain breads - though they tend to be a *lot* more expensive than some of the good 100% whole wheats I've found.  (Storebrand, nice short ingredient list, lots of protein and fibre.)

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