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Calorie Count Blog

Fried Food's Impact on You


By +Carolyn Richardson on Apr 25, 2012 10:00 AM in Healthy Eating

If you were asked to avoid unhealthy foods for a week, you might think fried foods wouldn't make the menu. Americans get 53% of their daily total fat from added fats and oils, a large portion of which comes from fried foods. Because multiple studies have pointed to oil consumption, particularly saturated fat, as one of the key dietary contributors to chronic diseases including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and hypertension, it's not surprising that many healthy eaters try to nix fried foods from their diets. Despite the evidence that fried food is less than healthy, a new study claims the frequency of eating fried food isn't linked to developing heart disease. But is there something behind their findings? 

The Study: Mediterraneans Fry Foods But Stay Healthy

A Spanish study of over 40,000 adults reports that the frequency of eating fried foods had no effect on the development of coronary heart disease. In an 11- year follow-up, some 606 heart disease events took place and 1135 total deaths occurred. The study also points out the results did not vary between those who used olive oil and safflower oil. If you dig deeper into the results however, you'll discover the lifestyle behind the results. The people of Spain, a Mediterranean country, are known for their healthy lifestyle. The use of healthy fats in cooking, occasional red meat consumption, and regular physical activity, are indicators that would help reduce the incidence of heart disease. That said, the specific effect of fried food consumption can't be separated from the population's generally healthy habits.

The Difference in America 

The reason why the results of the study should not send Americans to the deep-fryer is because of the disparate overall rate of heart disease in the country. Spain stands 24th out of 26 countries in Europe with a minuscule rate of heart disease deaths at just 53.8 per 100,000. In contrast, heart disease is the number one killer in America at 186.5 per 100,000 in 2008. In America, fried foods go beyond the scope of cooking oil in a pan. The staggering amount of total fat from added oils in American stands at 74.5 pounds per person per year according to USDA numbers from the year 2000, 29 of which are attributed to baking and frying fats. This number is 67% higher than it was in the 1950's.

Choosing Fried Foods

If you're counting calories and eating a healthy diet, using discretionary calories to eat fried foods is an allowable treat every so often. Be prepared to watch your portion size and the type of fried food you're eating. While you're better to go baked or steamed, if you must, consider this: if you're eating a 2000 calorie a day diet, you have 260 calories to work with. Two pieces of dark fried chicken accounts for 431 calories, while the baked version is about half the calories and almost 20 grams less fat regardless of the oil used. A cup of steamed rice is about 242 calories, while a cup of fried rice is about 390 calories and 10 additional grams of fat. Regardless of the recent study's findings, the additional calories and fat grams that fried foods add to your diet can have a negative impact on your health if eaten regularly and in large portions.


Your thoughts...

When did you give up fried food and how has it changed your daily caloric intake? 



Comments


I like the article and agree with almost everything about fried food!



So is cooking chicken in a pan with olive oil frying it?

how else do you cook it?



Original Post by: mspa523425588

So is cooking chicken in a pan with olive oil frying it?

how else do you cook it?


Broiling, baking, roasting, grilling, steaming, boiling, poaching, microwave-ing...there are so many ways to cook chicken, either whole or in parts, and they are all delicious! Google any cooking method with the word "chicken" and you will find lots of recipes that are fairly easy to make.



So... what does this study prove? Can I have fried food once a week or something or not? 

I am sorry but the piece didn't make much sense to me (don't mean its the author's fault). 



thankfull at home we have never been to dig on fried foods. when we want something like that we fry the outside and then let our food finish cooking in the oven. works good to, with chicken it's great cause you get the oils to drip out but you keep the crunchy skin ..  :)



An easy alternative to having crumbed or breaded fried chicken is to crumb skinless chicken pieces by dipping in egg then in FRESH breadcrumbs (dried breadcrumbs are far more compact and add more calories).  I put some freshly chopped herbs, a little salt and pepper into the fresh crumbs for extra flavour.

Then put them on a baking sheet and spray them with olive oil very lightly.  You don't need to deepfry!

Bake in a reasonably hot oven for about 30-45 mins depending on the size of your chicken pieces. 



Other than my 2 eggs each morning cooked in a tablespoon of olive oil, I rarely eat fried foods.  This has made huge difference on my weight loss and how I feel in general.



Actually, I agree with the comment "So is cooking chicken in a pan with olive oil frying it?"

That is my favorite way to cook chicken breast - pound them flat, a nonstick pan, and 1 tsp olive oil wiped around the inside of the pan. I do not consider this frying. I could do this on a grill pan, and call it "grilling."

I have always thought that "fried food" refers to the technique where there is enough oil in the pan to completely cover the bottom with a noticeable depth (one the one hand) to full immersion (on the other.) The article refers to "deep fat fryers." 

Just commenting.



I think a key to this article is "2,000 calories." A 2,000 calorie diet is essentially for a person maintaining weight who is completely inert.

In 1967, Ken Cooper published "Aerobics" which gave point values for exercise. It was found to reduce heart disease without any change in diet. Back then we ate what we wanted. That was probably a little extreme.

A person who is very active NEEDS more fat in their diet to give them energy while being active. Caloriecount takes that into account if you select active for lifestyle.

The problem I have is people are taking fat out of everything. It is becoming increasingly difficult to get enough fat in my diet to get the calories I need. It is also becoming increasingly expensive as they stop selling large boxes/bags of things.

I would dispute your base number of fat in the 50's. My mother used to cook chicken in Crisco. Remember the cans with pictures of chicken on them? She fried most of our meat in Crisco. We ate bacon sometimes. Eggs. And we sometimes had french fries from McDonald's in later years. We ate pierogi fried in butter.

The difference is we were more active back then.

The difference in heart attack deaths was probably more due to lack of treatment options than the number of people who actually had a heart attack.

For those who may think I have a poor diet, I generally get an B+ when I log it.

I'm too old to die young now, so what I do must be working.

 

 

 



I love french fries and especially homemade ones. I do eat them in moderation, usually one medium sized potato. What is the best oil, health wise, to cook them in? There are so many on the market, canola, peanut, sunflower, shortening etc.



i started watching my diet around the end of December/beginning of January. however, i have a fast food meal every week as a treat. lately I've been getting kids' meals which is better i guess. but of course, less fried foods = less calories.



Original Post by: mspa523425588

So is cooking chicken in a pan with olive oil frying it?

how else do you cook it?


I don't consider cooking skinless chicken in a measured amount of olive oil the same thing as a deep fried piece of chicken. You can add the calories from 1 tbs olive oil 120 and 4 oz skinless chicken 128 that you are using total 248 & good fat. A piece of fried Chicken breast is around 360, depends on where you get the calorie count. You are now talking not only more calories, but bad fats and carbs from the breading. 

 



we have to keep in mind that there is bad fat and good fat, such as avocado, nuts, olive, cocunut, that figth the bad fat, but is also important know that all this good fat or oils, change their own chimistrie if they get in a hi temperature and transforms in a saturated fat, no matters what. if you want just to lost weigth of course you can do the calories count, but if you want to be healty too you will try to avoid bad fat.



Original Post by: mbar658944084

An easy alternative to having crumbed or breaded fried chicken is to crumb skinless chicken pieces by dipping in egg then in FRESH breadcrumbs (dried breadcrumbs are far more compact and add more calories).  I put some freshly chopped herbs, a little salt and pepper into the fresh crumbs for extra flavour.

Then put them on a baking sheet and spray them with olive oil very lightly.  You don't need to deepfry!

Bake in a reasonably hot oven for about 30-45 mins depending on the size of your chicken pieces. 


I have never been able to make a good "oven fried" chicken.  Always, the breading on the  bottom of the chicken piece touching the pan gets mushy.  I've tried elevating it on a rack, which helps a little, but still don't get the results I'd like, a nice crispy crust. I've also tried turning the chicken part way through the cooking and have tried broiling the crust when the chicken has finished cooking, but the results aren't great.

 Does anyone have a good way to oven fry (without actually frying the pieces in a pan first) and get a crisp crust around the whole surface of the chicken?



i dont  eat anything  fried only grilled no oil or  butter. i use no fat or add salt to anything. i dont add  sugar to anything. i eat under 1200 calories max mabey 1200. i dont  buy sugar not necessery. fruit is sweet and use french mustard  for  salads. it has no sugar  egg or flour like other mustards.



I have, over the years, read many articles on nutrition.  If you just wait a while, you can always find a study that will contradict the last study.  Science is great, but the path to discovery often has many switchbacks.  In the mean time, moderation is key!  Enjoy eating the foods you love, but keep a balanced program to include strength training and aerobics.  

An added point:  We sometimes think that we need to buy exotic shakes and bars and spend a lot of money!  Actually, just ordinary food works fine when it is the basis of a balanced nutrition program!

The article does confirm that no one food is "the devil".



I have been doing a low carb diet almost two years now (180lbs lost so far).  This is the kind of stuff I have been reading:

"For years, health experts have advised people to cut as much saturated fat out of their diet as possible to reduce heart disease risk. This study suggests that if simple carbohydrates replace saturated fat calories, this may increase heart-disease risk, not lessen it. Simply put: simple carbohydrates increase heart disease risk more than saturated fat."

Go here (http://www.bastyrcenter.org/content/view/1982/), if you want to read more about what she (expert in chronic disease prevention, epidemiology, and nutrition) is talking about.  

I eat fried food all the time.  As people have pointed out, it is really what type of oil you are using and what you are frying that makes the difference.  Frying something heavily breaded or other carbs (like popcorn chicken or potatoes), is not the best thing for you, but frying a chicken breast in olive oil is no worse than baking it, from what I have been learning.  



If anyone is craving fried chicken, my parents found the healthier baked version a long time ago: simply take raw chicken, roll it in nonfat plain yogurt and then roll in breadcrumbs and bake! Tastes exactly the same, except almost no oil used! :D

Hope this recipe helps!

I think moderation and exercise are key in this too, like the article had said about Spain being active: most Americans aren't, and then we have this thing called moderation that I think most don't follow... :( Sad situations, but it's the strong group like us who should spread the word about stuff like this, with our own stories as evidence.

 

Maybe just start by suggesting to others (or to yourself) to only treat yourself to fried foods on a day every other week?  :)



This article is rather confused. The Mediterraneans eat mostly veg (aubergine, courgettes, sweet peppers/capsicum) roasted in olive oil and eaten hot, or stored in fresh oil after roasting and eaten cold. Also meat & fish fried in a very small quantity of olive oil.  That is fine.  What should be avoided - and which they hardly ever eat - is deep-fried meat and fish in breadcrumbs or batter etc. (KFC) It is fried carbohydrates that should be avoided.

Safflower oil is essential (1tbsp/day, like olive). Both must be extra virgin and cold-pressed. Safflower should not be used for cooking. At a certain temperature it loses its qualities.

I was diagnosed with a gluten intolerance (not allergy). I gave up bread, pastry and pasta and lost 10 kilos immediately!



To keep the bottom of the chicken from getting soggy, crumple up some aluminum foil, so there are peaks and valleys.  Then just gently place the chicken on top.  It helps a ton!!!



Why add the unnecessary extra calories by adding the breadcrumbs to your checken? You can marinate it with any spices you like and add a little tsp olive oil on top and bake it in an oven tray covered with aluminum foil for 30-45 min. It is just as good. Of course you can do the same with potatoe wedges if you don't want to deep fry them.


I think there is a factor of getting used to and becoming drawn to the taste of fried foods, I rarely have fried foods but do notice when I have them I have to watch myself, because i start remembering and craving it more than usual. Maybe that is just me, but I have to watch it.

 



Fortunately my husband & I didn't get a lot of fried foods as kids so we don't eat a bunch now & we don't even know how to fry...we gave it a go though & failed miserabley resulting in a scorched ceiling, a fire extinguisher & me cowering in the kitchen corner! Lmao! EmbarassedLaughing

 

Just a funny story~



Original Post by: mspa523425588

So is cooking chicken in a pan with olive oil frying it?

how else do you cook it?


are you kidding?

I almost never eat fried foods, oil does not agree with my stomach and i can't stand battered or breaded food.. uck!Money mouth

Most foods that are fried taste worlds better if broiled, baked, or grilled minus the cruddy coating of batter or crumbs. When I eat meat or vegis that is what i want to taste, not some soggy oil laden batter or crumb coating..

sorry just can say enough how gross i find that way of preparing food - and i've always felt that way, even as a kid... just didn't grow up on fried food...



There is enough natural fat in chicken to cook it without added oils, especially if you bake or roast it with the skin on.

I recently did a study where I interviewed many slim, healthy adults to ask about their eating habits and how they prepare foods.

I now use this wonderful recipe for chicken parts:  Remove all the skin from the chicken parts before cooking, then brush the parts with EV olive oil. Then i bake them in my toaster oven on 325 for about 45 minutes.  Then I brush them with a mixture of barbecue sauce and worchestire sauce (which cuts the sugar in the BBQ sauce.  Then broil the partts for an additional 20 minutes till you see a nice blackened coating on the skin.   DELICIOUS!

 



These are the exact kind of articles that drive me CRAZY!  All the questions you all have asked is exactly why driving yourself crazy with "eat this, but not that" or "NEVER eat this" is wholly frustrating.  We KNOW what to eat: Fresh fruits & vegetables, non-deep fried foods, whole grains, etc. etc.

I've just been cutting my main meals in half and eating them throughout my day like the Half Meal Habit.  Sure, I eat fried foods sometimes.  I also love raw veggies!  And I eat white rice (gasp!). And I eat pasta (although there are a lot of protein pastas out there that rock.  I eat all that, just half of what I used to.  

BTW, I LOVE all the healthy recipes everyone is sharing.  I've tried many of them.  Anytime I can cook healthy, I try.  But if I crave fried chicken (once every month or two), I'm going to eat GOOD fried chicken, by gum!  I'll just eat half, :-).

Jim

Learn how to eat less, move more, & hydrate



After studying nutrition for 3 years (so far) in college, this article is just a load of BS. They didn't separate "deep fried" and "pan fried" in the studies. Obviously, if you pan fry your foods you're only adding about a tablespoon or two of fat to the ENTIRE dish. If it makes 6 servings that's only 1/2 to 1 tsp extra fat per serving. If you deep fry, who know how much extra fat you're adding. Also, you are more likely to use olive oil or other healthier oils when you pan fry than deep fry because of the cost and taste. The reason heart disease is so bad in the US is because people eat deep fried food everyday, never eat fruits and vegetables, and never exercise. The article actually says this "If you dig deeper into the results however, you'll discover the lifestyle behind the results." This claims that it was lifestyle, not fat intake that affected the prevalence of heart disease. If you want to be healthy as far as eating goes, go on choosemyplate.gov and learn how to eat healthy. Before I wanted to study nutrition, I lost 50 pounds just by following the food pyramid. The new food plate is even better.



It's because Americans and Canadians deep fry their food.... deep fried food is absolutely disgusting! Imagine cooking your piece of chicken in TOTAL FAT???!!!

Immersing it, drenching it in total fat?? GROSS!!

 

and yet, we do it, we eat it, and we give it to our CHILDREN almost every day!!

 

Don't eat at fast food chains, people!!!! Period!!! McDonald's isn't for children.... people should be ashamed to take their children there!!!!!



Original Post by: gcousins

I have been doing a low carb diet almost two years now (180lbs lost so far).  This is the kind of stuff I have been reading:

"For years, health experts have advised people to cut as much saturated fat out of their diet as possible to reduce heart disease risk. This study suggests that if simple carbohydrates replace saturated fat calories, this may increase heart-disease risk, not lessen it. Simply put: simple carbohydrates increase heart disease risk more than saturated fat."

Go here (http://www.bastyrcenter.org/content/view/1982/), if you want to read more about what she (expert in chronic disease prevention, epidemiology, and nutrition) is talking about.  

I eat fried food all the time.  As people have pointed out, it is really what type of oil you are using and what you are frying that makes the difference.  Frying something heavily breaded or other carbs (like popcorn chicken or potatoes), is not the best thing for you, but frying a chicken breast in olive oil is no worse than baking it, from what I have been learning.  


Excellent website gcousins! Thanks for the link!



I do not coat any my fried foods, except in spices, nor do I use alot of oil, if any.  I have titanium lined fry pans so foods don't stick and they do work.  Would my foods be considered higher in calories than by cooking them in the oven?



74.5 pounds of fat a year?????....wow



Remember that fat helps satiate you, so you don't over eat. Fat is not the enemy, but the types of fat we eat can be.

My favorite way to do chicken is marinate it. I buy fresh chicken breasts, trim them, "butterfly" them (so there's more surface area for the marinade, and then let them marinate for at least 20 minutes, ideally 4 hours and up to overnight. If I marinate them for less time, I pour the extra marinade in the pan and let them simmer as they cook in the pan. The breasts can also go in without pouring the extra marinate over it. If you simmer them in the marinade, you don't need oil or cooking spray; I cover and let it sit for 7 minutes then flip for 3 (but this depends on the thickness of the chicken). If you don't cook in the marinade, you can use some olive oil cooking spray, but a non stick pan will do the trick too. You can also put a little water in the pan if it starts to burn, which steams it a little too.

The chicken is really juicy this way if not overdone! Enjoy the flavored of the marinade and you'll forget it's not fried!


I haven't had fried food in years. I stopped eating it when I gave up fats food, and when I went gluten free I wasn't able to consume them anyway. I recently found a restaurant that makes fries in a dedicated gluten free frier, and I have eaten them once. Besides that. I do not cook any fried foods anymore. I have made crispy baked chicken without oil, and I use Non-stick Spray whenever I cook in a pan. I don't even use oil in baking anymore. I haven't touched a bottle of oil in a long time.

I get most of my fats from eating nuts, seeds, and nut butters. There is plenty of oil in those foods for me!



Original Post by: runnertara

It's because Americans and Canadians deep fry their food.... deep fried food is absolutely disgusting! Imagine cooking your piece of chicken in TOTAL FAT???!!!

Immersing it, drenching it in total fat?? GROSS!!

 

and yet, we do it, we eat it, and we give it to our CHILDREN almost every day!!

 

Don't eat at fast food chains, people!!!! Period!!! McDonald's isn't for children.... people should be ashamed to take their children there!!!!!


I completely agree!



I agree with the article it's hard to compare the American diet and those elsewhere.  I have begun to change my diet as a result of heart issues with my father.  Without beginning to exercise yet I have gone from 272 to 257 and i am still losing weight slowly. 

I don't eat fried fast food and barely use any oil during cooking, if I want to pan fry something I used a Pam or a little olive oil Tbs or less.  I also add water to the pan to help steam/boil whatever I am cooking.

We come from a family of fried food eaters, and way too large portions.  It has taken awhile to change our attitude towards food and healthy cooking and ingredients.  I check everything for fat, salt, sugar, and try to eat as much vegetables and fruits whenever I can.

It is an ongoing process and I know that I have much more to learn and new exciting recipes that are out there to make the transition easier. 

As rough as we may believe it is to change our lifestyle, anything is easier than going through a heart bypass like my father went through. Thankfully it scared the crap out of us and we have begun to change.  

Hope everyone has success in improving their diet, I took the first step and look forward to the future.

Aloha,

Brandon

 



Original Post by: gcousins

I have been doing a low carb diet almost two years now (180lbs lost so far).  This is the kind of stuff I have been reading:

"For years, health experts have advised people to cut as much saturated fat out of their diet as possible to reduce heart disease risk. This study suggests that if simple carbohydrates replace saturated fat calories, this may increase heart-disease risk, not lessen it. Simply put: simple carbohydrates increase heart disease risk more than saturated fat."

Go here (http://www.bastyrcenter.org/content/view/1982/), if you want to read more about what she (expert in chronic disease prevention, epidemiology, and nutrition) is talking about.  

I eat fried food all the time.  As people have pointed out, it is really what type of oil you are using and what you are frying that makes the difference.  Frying something heavily breaded or other carbs (like popcorn chicken or potatoes), is not the best thing for you, but frying a chicken breast in olive oil is no worse than baking it, from what I have been learning.  


Congratulations on the weight loss!

The crusade against fried foods, red meat and other "unhealthy" foods started in 1982.  We were supposed to replace them with carbohydrates.  The uptick in obesity started in 1982.  Since then we've heard about saturated, unsaturated and trans fats, bran to prevent high cholesterol, refined flour , soda pop and fruit drinks.  You can hardly go a day without hearing about the obesity epidemic.  Clearly the "experts" don't have it 100% right.

The case against fried foods if you are trying to lose weight is that they are higher in calories than the same food not fried.  Like anything else, eaten in moderation, fried foods very likely do no harm.  If you are doing a low carb diet, you can't eat them in moderation, or moderation is a very low carb intake.

 

 

 

 

 



Original Post by: trumpetgrlzrock

After studying nutrition for 3 years (so far) in college, this article is just a load of BS. They didn't separate "deep fried" and "pan fried" in the studies. Obviously, if you pan fry your foods you're only adding about a tablespoon or two of fat to the ENTIRE dish. If it makes 6 servings that's only 1/2 to 1 tsp extra fat per serving. If you deep fry, who know how much extra fat you're adding. Also, you are more likely to use olive oil or other healthier oils when you pan fry than deep fry because of the cost and taste. The reason heart disease is so bad in the US is because people eat deep fried food everyday, never eat fruits and vegetables, and never exercise. The article actually says this "If you dig deeper into the results however, you'll discover the lifestyle behind the results." This claims that it was lifestyle, not fat intake that affected the prevalence of heart disease. If you want to be healthy as far as eating goes, go on choosemyplate.gov and learn how to eat healthy. Before I wanted to study nutrition, I lost 50 pounds just by following the food pyramid. The new food plate is even better.


O.K.  'the reason heart desease is so bad in the us is because people eat deep fried food everyday , never eat fruits and vegetables and never exercise'

Lets be clear that is not a true statement either, I am an american, and I do NOT eat fried foods everyday, I DO eat fruits and veggies, and I Do exercise.

This is not to say that we do not have a ton of bad eating habits, but many, many Americans are trying to change this  and effect change.  Laws are changing and there are some great changes happening everyday.



Original Post by: greener333

Original Post by: gcousins

I have been doing a low carb diet almost two years now (180lbs lost so far).  This is the kind of stuff I have been reading:

"For years, health experts have advised people to cut as much saturated fat out of their diet as possible to reduce heart disease risk. This study suggests that if simple carbohydrates replace saturated fat calories, this may increase heart-disease risk, not lessen it. Simply put: simple carbohydrates increase heart disease risk more than saturated fat."

Go here (http://www.bastyrcenter.org/content/view/1982/), if you want to read more about what she (expert in chronic disease prevention, epidemiology, and nutrition) is talking about.  

I eat fried food all the time.  As people have pointed out, it is really what type of oil you are using and what you are frying that makes the difference.  Frying something heavily breaded or other carbs (like popcorn chicken or potatoes), is not the best thing for you, but frying a chicken breast in olive oil is no worse than baking it, from what I have been learning.  


Congratulations on the weight loss!

The crusade against fried foods, red meat and other "unhealthy" foods started in 1982.  We were supposed to replace them with carbohydrates.  The uptick in obesity started in 1982.  Since then we've heard about saturated, unsaturated and trans fats, bran to prevent high cholesterol, refined flour , soda pop and fruit drinks.  You can hardly go a day without hearing about the obesity epidemic.  Clearly the "experts" don't have it 100% right.

The case against fried foods if you are trying to lose weight is that they are higher in calories than the same food not fried.  Like anything else, eaten in moderation, fried foods very likely do no harm.  If you are doing a low carb diet, you can't eat them in moderation, or moderation is a very low carb intake.

 

 

 

 

 


I agree, the frying in oil will increase the calories of the meal versus baking it, and  I still need to count calories even on my low carb diet.  I find that if I eat more than 1600 calories/day average, I won't lose anything.  But frying just makes somethings taste better.  I enjoy eating, and I am still enjoying it on this diet.  I can eat this way the rest of my life.  Who would have thought I could lose weight without starving all the time.  Granted, when I reach my weight lost goal, I will increase my daily carb limit from 30g to 100g (100g will allow for just about any food back in my diet, just moderation is the key).  For people like me, I know if I go back to the way I was eating (250-400g of carbs/day), I will just end up in the same place; fat and tired all the time.  How can I expect anything different?



Original Post by: jdetam

Original Post by: mbar658944084

An easy alternative to having crumbed or breaded fried chicken is to crumb skinless chicken pieces by dipping in egg then in FRESH breadcrumbs (dried breadcrumbs are far more compact and add more calories).  I put some freshly chopped herbs, a little salt and pepper into the fresh crumbs for extra flavour.

Then put them on a baking sheet and spray them with olive oil very lightly.  You don't need to deepfry!

Bake in a reasonably hot oven for about 30-45 mins depending on the size of your chicken pieces. 


I have never been able to make a good "oven fried" chicken.  Always, the breading on the  bottom of the chicken piece touching the pan gets mushy.  I've tried elevating it on a rack, which helps a little, but still don't get the results I'd like, a nice crispy crust. I've also tried turning the chicken part way through the cooking and have tried broiling the crust when the chicken has finished cooking, but the results aren't great.

 Does anyone have a good way to oven fry (without actually frying the pieces in a pan first) and get a crisp crust around the whole surface of the chicken?


If you bake the chicken on a stone, it will absorb the liquid and make it more crispy.



Let's face it, for most of us, grease tastes good! The article is a little confusing. Eat fried foods in moderation coupled with exercise and you won't die of heart disease? Yeah ok. Let's just call a spade a spade, eating fried foods isn't going to kill you or give you heart disease alone. Other factors cause poor health and contribute to developing heart disease and if those changes don't occur at all or occur too late, you can still have blockages and occlusions, even at your ideal weight exercising 3-5 days a week.  Conclusion: you will die of heart disease eating a carrot on the treadmill. x-(

So, if you truly are committed to a healthier lifestyle and treat your body like a temple, it's hard to over indulge in fried foods. They taste gross and slow you down. The point of eating them to make you feel good when you eat them decreases as your health increase. If you have changed your diet and included exercise in your life for 2 months or more, challenge yourself to eat something you use to eat regularly. See how it tastes and how it makes you feel. You'll only have room for an actual portion or less and your taste buds would have changed and it'll make you say, YUCK!



I love cooking and want you to share more can I become a professional chef in the future when I have to have a family.



Interestingly enough, the article doesn't mention that American fried foods also seem to have addictive qualities.  I've noticed that the surest way to stop overeating fried foods is to cut them out entirely for a month.  Then something "normalizes" in my system and I stop craving them.  Doesn't that point to some sort of addictive substance in them, or is this just my crazy hormones?



I chose to sautée my foods with a minimum amount of light olive oil. I eat only real food and no sugar, flour or white rice. One ingredient food - meat( chicken and turkey 90%, pork and rarely beef), fruit and veggies.


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