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Calorie Count Blog

Healthier Breakfast Cereals with Less Sugar


By +Carolyn Richardson on Jul 07, 2012 10:00 AM in Healthy Eating
The meal that starts the day for most Americans isn’t a bowl of oatmeal or an omelet and breakfast potatoes. It’s ready-to-eat cereal. Behind beverages and bread, cereal is America’s most popular purchase in the grocery store. The $6 billion industry has been declining in recent years, but for those of us who do partake, it’s important to know how to keep the added sugar cereal is known for to a minimum. Sure oatmeal, barley, or millet with fruit and nuts are the ideal iteration of a healthy whole grain breakfast, but not everyone can give up their cereal bowls. Here’s how familiar cereals stack up on the added sugar front. 

The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories of added sugar a day for women and 150 for men. That's just 24 and 36 grams respectively. A single serving of some cereals exceed this amount. Take the most popular breakfast cereals in America: Honey Nut Cheerios, Special K, and Honey Bunches of Oats. 
 
Honey Nut Cheerios - 110 Calories
Serving Size: 3/4 cup, Protein: 2g, Added Sugars: 9g, Fiber: 2g

A better Cheerios choice may be regular Cheerios which boasts just 1 gram of added sugar in its 1 cup serving size. Multigrain Cheerios has a little less sugar than the Honey Nut variety at 6 grams, and its larger 1 cup serving size boasts the same 110 calories with an extra gram of fiber.
 
Special K Original - 120 Calories
Serving Size: 1 cup, Protein: 6g, Added Sugars: 4g ,Fiber: 0g

The calorie count of this rice-based cereal got some unwanted publicity recently as an advertisement was deemed misleading for not mentioning the additional calorie count of added milk. The Advertising Standards Authority banned the commercial saying Kellogg's should have made clear the calories listed did not include milk calories. So you know, a cup of 2% milk would add 122 calories. Interesting how they didn't mention the fact that the ad calls the 1 cup serving a "bowl." By the way, according to the nutrition facts on their website, there is no fiber in a serving of this cereal, which may leave you less satiated than other more fiber-packed options. Sad that the box lists the milk calories of 1/2 cup of skimmed milk, when that seems like a very small amount of milk to add to a "bowl."   
 
Honey Bunches of Oats Honey Roasted - 120 Calories
Serving Size: 3/4 cup, Protein: 2g, Added Sugars: 6g, Fiber: 2g

I like that their website mentions a serving has the same amount of calories as Special K, without pointing out that their serving size is a 1/4 cup smaller. Also interesting about this cereal is despite its name, corn, wheat and sugar are listed before oats, meaning it's more like sugar bunches of corn. To be fair there is honey in the ingredient list as well, just happens to be after salt, rice flour, vegetable oil and a few other ingredients. Other varieties of this Post brand cereal include Vanilla Bunches, Just Bunches and Raisin Medley, all of which add up to 200 or more calories per cup with ample amounts of added sugar.
 
 
More Filling Options
If you go for the less sugar claims, be extra vigilant in checking that yours doesn't have artificial sweeteners. Some cereals get away with no added sugar labels, but hide the fact that artificial sweeteners are used. Fiber One and Special K Protein Plus are two examples. While a recent study in the Journal of Nutrition suggests foods, including cereals, that use artificial sweeteners can help control caloric intake, the findings show they may not be as satiating. To help you stay full, find cereals with high protein and fiber content that aren't too big on sugar. Many cereals bump up the protein grams with soy. Also, a number of high fiber cereals have smaller serving sizes, so if the calorie count looks minuscule, it's probably because the serving size is smaller than usual. With the extra protein and fiber, the additional calories are nutritionally justified.
 
Kashi GoLean Cereal - 148 Calories 
Serving Size: 1 cup Protein: 13g Added Sugars: 6g Fiber: 10g

Nature's Path Optimum Slim - 210 Calories
Serving Size: 1 cup Protein: 9g Added Sugars: 7g Fiber: 9g 
 
No Added Sugar
It's slim pickings, but there are cereal options that have no added sugar. The drawback is that many also are scant on nutritional value. Adding sliced banana, blueberries, strawberries, or even a tablespoon of honey with protein-rich nuts will give these plain offerings a boost without the multiple sweeteners many other cereals have. These also don't have salt in their ingredient lists, something many other cereals have in considerable amounts.

Post Shredded Wheat Original - 170 Calories
Serving Size: 1 cup, Protein: 5g, Added Sugars: 0g, Fiber: 6g 
 
Quaker Puffed Rice - 54 Calories
Serving Size: 1 cup, Protein: 1g, Added Sugars: 0g, Fiber: 0.2g 

Kashi 7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs - 70 Calories
Serving Size: 1 cup, Protein: 2g, Added Sugars: 0g, Fiber: 1g

Your thoughts...

Do you eat more than the suggested serving size of your favorite cereal? 


Comments


Cereals are one of the WORST foods to eat. Heart healthy grains are NOT healthy foods, especially when so highly processed, and they are full of additives too.

With bulging waistlines, Americans are on a bad diet if they continue to believe grains are really that good for you. Especially diabetics who are told to "watch the carbs" yet also to add "heart healthy grains" and "whole wheat" products to replace white flour.

Read the book "Wheat Belly" and see that grains are no longer recommended at all.

In your comments you show the proteins and sugars but NOT the high carbs, which is what is affecting most people as carbs turn into sugar almost as fast as you can swallow them.

 



Nannam is absolutely correct. I have finally been able to lose my excess body weight and hopefully will avoid the fate of my mother (early death from diabetes). Wheat Belly is a very helpful book. You have to begin to think of all grains as poison but especially wheat in any form. Gary Taubes' books about fat are also helpful. You need to lots of the right fats to get healthy. Saturated fats from healthy organic animals are your friends. Highly processed man-made fats should not be part of a human diet. Take a look at the some of the many versions of the Paleo Diet. It works!


I like the fiber one shredded wheat. It has a lot of fiber, moderate amount of protein and lots of vitamins....90% of your daily recommended iron! Which is great for me since multivitamins with iron in them make me sick and I don't eat that many food with enough of it.



Breakfast - the most over-rated, unnecessary meal of the day for most people.  I prefer black coffee with splenda. 

In the morning after waking, cortisol is at a high and fat cells are at their highest insulin sensitivity - the best time to store fat.

http://www.leangains.com/2012/06/why-does-breakfast-make-me- hungry.html

http://www.seanhyson.com/blog/new-things-i-learned

http://www.leangains.com/2010/10/top-ten-fasting-myths-debun ked.html



Moderation is the key to most of life's challenges. I have lost 48 pounds  this year while choosing a 'moderate' breakfast serving: (1/3 cup) of Special K or Bran flakes each morning served with a 35 calorie packeage of 0% fat light yogurt, plus 2 oz. of 1% milk, and either i/3 of a peach or a few strawberries or blueberries. with a cup of coffee, that comes in well below 200 calories and provides a significant amount of iron, calcium, and vitamin C.  I find this breakfast both satisfying and tasty.



I eat a breakfast of bran buds (1/3 cup) with plain non-fat Keifer (1 cup) every morning. 70 calories for the bran buds and 110 calories for the Keifer. Add some fresh cut up strawberries and you have a very healthy, fast meal that anyone can whip up in a matter of minutes.


P.S. The photo attached is the 'before' version. I'm plannng to lose another 30 pounds before providing the 'after' photograph.



I love the Fiber One original, and 1/2 cup serving with 1/4 cup blueberries and 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk does satisfy me with only about 100 calories.  It is what I need to get my daily fiber intake and I love the taste!  That along with peanut butter on a whole Wheat lite English muffin gives me a 270 calorie breakfast.  I guess everyone is made differently as wheat does not bother me, I am fortunate.



I'm surprised to see not just one but two Paleo people post already.  Lol  Sadly people aren't very open to no grains sometimes....I talked to a person about Paleo and shes like...I couldn't do that! 

She said I love my grains too much....and this is someone who had been through breast cancer and conventional treatment...ie chemo and the horrible junk they put you through.  I would think as bad as that is if someone gave you a good alternative to staying cancer free you would jump at it.

Maybe she just doesn't believe ...or maybe its because the cancer is in remission and she would be more open to it if they were telling her she had to do more chemo.  Everyone's hooked on grains...they truly are addictive.

 



what about steel cut oats?

I make hot cereal steel cut oats mixed with quinoa in a rice cooker every morning and after it is cooked I throw in a variety of either fresh or dried blueberries rasberries walnuts unsalted cashews, sunflower seeds, sliced banana

top it with 2% milk



I was never a cereal eater, but started, because of the iron it provides, also it gives me carbs, which I always have not enough off.

I do weigh my food, so I take the knock off Fiber one sticks between 15 and 20 grams and the O's knock offs for the iron, about 10 grams. The real calories I get from LOTS of fruit I put on top and almond milk :)



Original Post by: nutz4pugz

I love the Fiber One original, and 1/2 cup serving with 1/4 cup blueberries and 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk does satisfy me with only about 100 calories.  It is what I need to get my daily fiber intake and I love the taste!  That along with peanut butter on a whole Wheat lite English muffin gives me a 270 calorie breakfast.  I guess everyone is made differently as wheat does not bother me, I am fortunate.


Calories in does not equal calories out because there are other factors like hormones.  For example did you know that if your body is producing a ton of cortisol(stress hormone) and your body has nothing to full it but fat and muscle and you don't have any carbohydrates lying around it'll use the muscle instead of the fat.

If you take in some calories of sugar your body uses insulin to remove the sugar from the blood stream and gets it stored as fat.  High amounts of insulin prevent you from using fat for fuel and so you can only use readily available carbs.  If you're eating few carbohydrates than your body will use those carbohydrates for energy and than start using fats if your cortisol is low enough.  If you're eating a good amount of carbohydrates insulin is up and also you have enough carbohydrates where your body will continue using those carbohydrates until they run out thus never using your fat stores for energy.

Guess what things have a ton of carbohydrates breakfast cereals..Sure if you actually use all the energy up after eating your cereal in exercise you may than be able to burn some fat off but its much harder to get past 300 200 calories in carbohydrates and than start burning fat than to get past a lesser amount to start burning fat.

Than there is the cortisol issue if you stress your body overly in exercise and the cortisol is too high instead of burning fat after your done with the carbohydrates your body will actually turn your muscle for energy instead of your fat stores.

 



I prefer to choose from non-GMO products listed on the nongmoshoppingguide.com to eat well and stay healthy



If you're fit and well eating a lot of carbohydrates its most likely that your body is really efficient at using your energy.  For some this efficiency doesn't last though and they start to gain doing the same routine as they age.  I would love it if my body allowed me to eat tons of carbohydrates and grains but mine certainly isn't as robust I suppose.



Original Post by: wuschelsmom

I was never a cereal eater, but started, because of the iron it provides, also it gives me carbs, which I always have not enough off.

I do weigh my food, so I take the knock off Fiber one sticks between 15 and 20 grams and the O's knock offs for the iron, about 10 grams. The real calories I get from LOTS of fruit I put on top and almond milk :)


There are many things with iron not just cereal.  If you find you are a good weight with none of the health issues many have attributed to eating grains

http://wellnessmama.com/575/how-grains-are-killing-you-slowl y/

here and many other places than go ahead and continue eating what works well for you.

If you do have some of the issues listed I highly recommend trying Paleo/Primal as they both avoid grains and the myriad issues they cause. 



some  wks i eat 1.oz bran flakes low sugar low  salt with 1 small pot plain  soy igurte with  either tripel  berrie mix  all fresh. blueberries  raseberries offten mix 50gr mango or  papaya or kiwi whole. rest of  day only  vegan meatless  and  veggies no oil butter salt ect.im officialy i vagan and  hope to  stay one  forever. i hate  rrwd meat always have also  hate fish and now allprocessed food. but if i go somewhere  they dont have soya food. i would hope to eat mabey very dry turkey breast or better yet beans chickpeas ect. where i live there is a big  variety of  soya  food luckely



Paleo? Really? The more I read about it the more I am convinced it's another fad and not healthy.


Original Post by: raiken3712

Original Post by: wuschelsmom

I was never a cereal eater, but started, because of the iron it provides, also it gives me carbs, which I always have not enough off.

I do weigh my food, so I take the knock off Fiber one sticks between 15 and 20 grams and the O's knock offs for the iron, about 10 grams. The real calories I get from LOTS of fruit I put on top and almond milk :)


There are many things with iron not just cereal.  If you find you are a good weight with none of the health issues many have attributed to eating grains

http://wellnessmama.com/575/how-grains-are-killing-you-slowl y/

here and many other places than go ahead and continue eating what works well for you.

If you do have some of the issues listed I highly recommend trying Paleo/Primal as they both avoid grains and the myriad issues they cause. 


Well I do have RA and take lots of steroids and other meds, but they don't help at all.

I just bought me a food processor and was thinking of going more raw, so what the heck, I will try it.

I am German and was raised on bread, heavy sauces and meat. Darn it!



The paleo cereal I eat is 1/4 C. sliced almonds, 1/4 C. unsweetened shredded coconut, and 1/4 C. blueberries. You can always choose portions to suit your personal eating habits. Plus you can use whatever fruit you enjoy also. This is truely all natural with nothing added. I also use coconut milk on mine. I love it. I cut out most grains, all processed foods and most all sweeteners, except for stevia in the raw.



Original Post by: nannam

Cereals are one of the WORST foods to eat. Heart healthy grains are NOT healthy foods, especially when so highly processed, and they are full of additives too.

With bulging waistlines, Americans are on a bad diet if they continue to believe grains are really that good for you. Especially diabetics who are told to "watch the carbs" yet also to add "heart healthy grains" and "whole wheat" products to replace white flour.

Read the book "Wheat Belly" and see that grains are no longer recommended at all.

In your comments you show the proteins and sugars but NOT the high carbs, which is what is affecting most people as carbs turn into sugar almost as fast as you can swallow them.

 


this


#1 Cold cereals in my humble opinion are glorified JUNK food.  They all contain ingredients that kept me fat and unhealthy for far too many years.  Wheat, other grain flours, sugar, and preservatives sabotaged all my weight loss efforts for too long. Corporations are interested in one thing--MONEY. They don't give a rat's behind about me, you, or how fat and sick we get as long as they can con us into thinking thier products are "healthy" and we buy them.

#2 I listen to my own body. If I am hungry-- I eat, if I am not-- I wait. I don't force myself to eat because some self-proclaimed expert insists I must eat breakfast or I must eat 5  times a day.

#3. When I am hungry in the morning I will sometimes have a spinach and mushroom omelet made with one whole egg and 1 egg white along with a serving of fresh citrus fruit.

If I don't want eggs I'll make a wonderful protein rich, fiber rich pumpkin-walnut mousse which is sugar free and low fat.  I will be serving this as dessert this year for Thanksgiving with a squirt of Land O'Lakes sugar free whipped cream which comes in an aerosol can now.)

You mix a 15 oz. can of Libby's 100% pure pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling), one 6 oz. container of Yoplait non-fat, plain GREEK yogurt (it's thick, rich, and has 15 grams of protein), 4 Tblsp. chopped walnuts (or any nuts you prefer), a sprinkle each of ground ginger, ground cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon, and 4-6 packets of STEVIA sweetener to taste. 

This makes 4 half-cup servings. It is OUT OF THIS WORLD!



That may be scientific but when I first get out of bed I am shaky and my skin is sweaty.  Sorry --- but I have to eat right away -- and not sugar, but grains and protein!!



I tried a low-carb diet for around a month, and I felt weak and constantly tired, experienced bouts of hypoglycemia, and lost no weight at all.  It simply wasn't going to work--my metabolism shut down, rather than converting properly.  I do have plans to try again one day--easing into it a great deal more slowly.  I suspect my body may be insulin resistant.  My favorite cereal is actually Bran Buds.  It's got tons of fiber, so a normal serving size actually suffices, and it keeps you full until lunch time.  I use rice, coconut, or soy milk (I have an intolerance to normal milk), and a piece of fruit.  Lunch is a peanut butter and jelly or lunch meat sandwich on whole wheat bread, and another piece of fruit.  Dinner is generally some sort of meat, and vegetables.  I get a 'splurge day' once every two weeks, on which I eat whatever I want.  It's not paleo, and certainly not low-carb, but I am losing a respectable amount of weight.  The trick will be keeping it off after the dieting's done.  Trying to figure out a maintenance diet is a lot more challenging than simply losing weight.



It's glorified junk food if you're eating Fruit Loops, Cap'n Crunch and the like. But your body needs the carbs, which you'll burn quickly unless you aren't active. Eggs a loaded with cholesterol and that is part of the problem. Besides who has time to whip up a hearty breakfast like you mentioned? One needs to be wise in our choosing and eat the right amount. Because no matter how healthy the meal is if you over eat, you'll be adding all those calories and if you don't use them up, they will store.

 



Actually, from what I understand, dietary cholesterol hasn't been proven to have a significant impact on your own blood cholesterol levels.  What's more, the link between cholesterol level and things like heart disease is shaky at best.



I find the comments concerning paleo vs commercial brand cereals hyperbole.  One of the reasons I joined this site is the non-denominational approach to weight loss and fitness.  I lost 55 pounds doing a very slow, safe approach that included exercise and lifestyle changes promoted by Calorie Count. 

I consider commercial brand cereals to be akin to fast food and really beyond the scope of healthy diets.  It's a given that anything on the market that promotes weight loss will have insidious additives that keep you from your health goals.  Lower fats will have higher sodium levels, higher sugar levels.  Lower suger amounts will often have artifical sweeteners and higher sodium levels. 

I do believe we all come from different backgrounds and have different bodies and therefore different dietary requirements.  I would never say with authority that my dietary goals should be someone else's.  As soon as I read "grains are evil", I cringe.  Grains are great for me and they fuel my running.  I have managed to keep my weight off after 3 years with exercise and measuring food.  I'm active enough that I can eat at least 2000 calories a day.  I follow a moderate 25-25-50% style diet.  It models what I have always enjoyed. 



mrsdagle, I think you got to the root of the entire issue--there's no such thing as an ideal human diet.  Human dietary requirements vary dramatically based on genetics and even development.  The reality is that most of us are left to experiment to try to find out what our personal optimal diet is, and there's very little help for that sort of thing.



Whole grain oats and rye are still "good" grains.



I agree with what you say about carbs. I was not losing the weight very fast. it was suggested I take  2  days a week together and have  2 low carb days not over 50gr. and believe me it really works I am losing quite well now on my carb days I may even go over my calories by as much as 300 or more. use cheese , fats, veg. prot. My only carbs for these 2 days ix what I get in fresh food. and I allow myself 1 slice w.w. bread but eggs, bacon fresh veg. is a nice change as well



Although there are far better options, I don't think i can bring myself to give up my plus cranberry cereal in the morning :( It tastes delicious, especially with 1/2 a cup of soy milk. And to answer the question, some mornings I stick to the recommended amount of 40 grams, but if I'm quite hungry, I end up having about 46 grams, but I find that it does keep me full.



My favorite cereal (other than old fashioned oatmeal) is Kellogg's Special K Protein Plus.  It has, in a 3/4 cup serving, 14 g carbs of which 5g are fiber, and 10 g protein.  Much better than Special K original.  It tastes great, and I usually have it with plain yogurt instead of milk.  Very satisfying!



The American Heart Association recommends no more than 100 calories of added sugar a day for women and 150 for men. That's just 24 and 36 grams respectively. A single serving of some cereals exceed this amount. Take the most popular breakfast cereals in America: Honey Nut Cheerios, Special K, and Honey Bunches of Oats.    Honey Nut Cheerios - 110 Calories Serving Size: 3/4 cup, Protein: 2g, Added Sugars: 9g, Fiber: 2g

In lieu of the statement that 24g men and 36g of added sugar is allowed, how does this serving of 9g come off as bad? I am hoping that I am misreading something and this will be a "never mind" statement, but please help me out by pointing out my error. Thanks.



Personally I have either a sweet potato, Korean Yam, protein Shake but- I did find ONE "cereal" besides cream of brown rice, gluten free oats- thats totally awesome, healthy and filling- It's called "Kays Naturals High Protein Cereal"

go to http://www.netrition.com/ and search "low carb", "cereal" or "kays Naturals"



Original Post by: mrsdagle

I find the comments concerning paleo vs commercial brand cereals hyperbole.  One of the reasons I joined this site is the non-denominational approach to weight loss and fitness.  I lost 55 pounds doing a very slow, safe approach that included exercise and lifestyle changes promoted by Calorie Count. 

I consider commercial brand cereals to be akin to fast food and really beyond the scope of healthy diets.  It's a given that anything on the market that promotes weight loss will have insidious additives that keep you from your health goals.  Lower fats will have higher sodium levels, higher sugar levels.  Lower suger amounts will often have artifical sweeteners and higher sodium levels. 

I do believe we all come from different backgrounds and have different bodies and therefore different dietary requirements.  I would never say with authority that my dietary goals should be someone else's.  As soon as I read "grains are evil", I cringe.  Grains are great for me and they fuel my running.  I have managed to keep my weight off after 3 years with exercise and measuring food.  I'm active enough that I can eat at least 2000 calories a day.  I follow a moderate 25-25-50% style diet.  It models what I have always enjoyed. 


mrsdagle THANK YOU ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^



Original Post by: nannam

Cereals are one of the WORST foods to eat. Heart healthy grains are NOT healthy foods, especially when so highly processed, and they are full of additives too.

With bulging waistlines, Americans are on a bad diet if they continue to believe grains are really that good for you. Especially diabetics who are told to "watch the carbs" yet also to add "heart healthy grains" and "whole wheat" products to replace white flour.

Read the book "Wheat Belly" and see that grains are no longer recommended at all.

In your comments you show the proteins and sugars but NOT the high carbs, which is what is affecting most people as carbs turn into sugar almost as fast as you can swallow them.

 


She is also talking about highly processed cereals, that has no values, and also damage is done by additives. Do not distract away from these points. You probably have not consumed real organic grains. The associations never want you to eat that, thats why the grains go directly to the companies for puffing, degradation, and devaluation.



WOW - I'm going to use that Pumkin Walnut Mousse - WOW  Thanks a MIl for that!!!!!!!!!!  God bless - Marsha



Cereal is awesome. I eat it every day and have gone from 32%bf to 15.4%bf in the past year eating cereal (among other things, in moderation of course.. )Almost everyone i know who does very lo carb is overweight and not getting any less fat. As for that wheatbelly book i strongly urge whoever bought it to return it or burn it


Original Post by: winged_wolf

Actually, from what I understand, dietary cholesterol hasn't been proven to have a significant impact on your own blood cholesterol levels.  What's more, the link between cholesterol level and things like heart disease is shaky at best.


Your understanding is the same understanding I have come to in my reading.  Sadly not everyone has found this out yet.



Original Post by: marshafisch78951

WOW - I'm going to use that Pumkin Walnut Mousse - WOW  Thanks a MIl for that!!!!!!!!!!  God bless - Marsha


There is no doubt properly prepared organic grains are much better than commercially available grains in "food" you buy in the store.  Gluten, phytic acid, lectin and others still have health effects for many and the amount of sugar in grains based on the fact they are complex carbs ie complex sugars is still a good amount.

That being said not everyone has major problems with the negatives still inherent in grains....and if you have plenty of physical activity than you can utilize the sugar instead of it turning into fat and leading to myriad issues.  If someone eats a bunch of grain whether it be commercially in the form of Capt Crunch or Organic sprouted or fermented its still a good amount of glucose and will lead to bad things if you don't use the sugar up.

Sugar in grains will drive up insulin fat storage etc... regardless if not used.  I probably come off as thinking grains are evil when I link to posts about grains being bad but I'm fully aware for some they don't seem to have all the bad effects that they do for others.  This is easily explained by the fact that some people are more efficient at dealing with grains...for I'm sure various reasons I don't know of and exercising etc..

 



Original Post by: ketansa

Original Post by: nannam

Cereals are one of the WORST foods to eat. Heart healthy grains are NOT healthy foods, especially when so highly processed, and they are full of additives too.

With bulging waistlines, Americans are on a bad diet if they continue to believe grains are really that good for you. Especially diabetics who are told to "watch the carbs" yet also to add "heart healthy grains" and "whole wheat" products to replace white flour.

Read the book "Wheat Belly" and see that grains are no longer recommended at all.

In your comments you show the proteins and sugars but NOT the high carbs, which is what is affecting most people as carbs turn into sugar almost as fast as you can swallow them.

 


She is also talking about highly processed cereals, that has no values, and also damage is done by additives. Do not distract away from these points. You probably have not consumed real organic grains. The associations never want you to eat that, thats why the grains go directly to the companies for puffing, degradation, and devaluation.


This quote was meant for above post.  It won't let me edit for some reason...thought it let you edit posts here confused.



Original Post by: mrsdagle

I find the comments concerning paleo vs commercial brand cereals hyperbole.  One of the reasons I joined this site is the non-denominational approach to weight loss and fitness.  I lost 55 pounds doing a very slow, safe approach that included exercise and lifestyle changes promoted by Calorie Count. 

I consider commercial brand cereals to be akin to fast food and really beyond the scope of healthy diets.  It's a given that anything on the market that promotes weight loss will have insidious additives that keep you from your health goals.  Lower fats will have higher sodium levels, higher sugar levels.  Lower suger amounts will often have artifical sweeteners and higher sodium levels. 

I do believe we all come from different backgrounds and have different bodies and therefore different dietary requirements.  I would never say with authority that my dietary goals should be someone else's.  As soon as I read "grains are evil", I cringe.  Grains are great for me and they fuel my running.  I have managed to keep my weight off after 3 years with exercise and measuring food.  I'm active enough that I can eat at least 2000 calories a day.  I follow a moderate 25-25-50% style diet.  It models what I have always enjoyed. 


No grains are not evil.  They do have several potential negatives as previously pointed out though.  There are also plenty of good starchy vegetables you can full higher amounts of activity on like Yams, Sweet Potatoes and the like as well. 

You can of course continue to full with grains if you find no issues with them glad its working well for you.  I'm just trying to stress for those having issues there are alternatives.

I'm not aware as I haven't done it myself but I have read of people doing heavy activity being fat adapted and not relying on carbohydrates for fuel.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/what-does-it-mean-to-be-a-fat -burning-beast/#axzz1yNLnESi5

 



fuel* with grains....wheres my edit button



Original Post by: 0snack

Cereal is awesome. I eat it every day and have gone from 32%bf to 15.4%bf in the past year eating cereal (among other things, in moderation of course.. )Almost everyone i know who does very lo carb is overweight and not getting any less fat. As for that wheatbelly book i strongly urge whoever bought it to return it or burn it

I would like to point out there are many potential issues related to losing weight....calories in is not equal to calories out and there may be something hormonal holding them back.

I'm very low carbohydrate and I'm losing the weight just fine.  I started at a high of 285 and I'm down to 255.  If you're effectively using your fuel and not overeating than you'll lose weight eating cereal just as well.

Why burn Wheat Belly?  There are plenty of cited research pages linked with the book.  It is good science....just because not everyone has issues with wheat or grains doesn't make it true that wheat and grains have major negatives for some...even many who don't test for celiac disease?  Have you read it?

Have you looked at the research?  Or are you just bashing it because you love your cereal so you feel the need to bash something that is generally against grain consumption especially wheat.



Original Post by: winged_wolf

I tried a low-carb diet for around a month, and I felt weak and constantly tired, experienced bouts of hypoglycemia, and lost no weight at all.  It simply wasn't going to work--my metabolism shut down, rather than converting properly.  I do have plans to try again one day--easing into it a great deal more slowly.  I suspect my body may be insulin resistant.  My favorite cereal is actually Bran Buds.  It's got tons of fiber, so a normal serving size actually suffices, and it keeps you full until lunch time.  I use rice, coconut, or soy milk (I have an intolerance to normal milk), and a piece of fruit.  Lunch is a peanut butter and jelly or lunch meat sandwich on whole wheat bread, and another piece of fruit.  Dinner is generally some sort of meat, and vegetables.  I get a 'splurge day' once every two weeks, on which I eat whatever I want.  It's not paleo, and certainly not low-carb, but I am losing a respectable amount of weight.  The trick will be keeping it off after the dieting's done.  Trying to figure out a maintenance diet is a lot more challenging than simply losing weight.


Many have dubbed this the low-carb flu and it happens because your body is used to working on carbohydrates...when it is switching over to using fat for fuel there can be some issues.

These don't usually last a month from what I've read...but I guess it varies...there are many articles and blog posts and forum comments out there that talk about ways to get past the low carbohydrate flu though.  Next time you try you should try to research it.

jackkruse.com and his blogs mention it somewhere in there..that's my favorite site he has a ton of good blogs I've read a vast majority of them and they have a ton of information with cites at the bottom of each and comments from people using reading his blog.



Original Post by: coldbore

It's glorified junk food if you're eating Fruit Loops, Cap'n Crunch and the like. But your body needs the carbs, which you'll burn quickly unless you aren't active. Eggs a loaded with cholesterol and that is part of the problem. Besides who has time to whip up a hearty breakfast like you mentioned? One needs to be wise in our choosing and eat the right amount. Because no matter how healthy the meal is if you over eat, you'll be adding all those calories and if you don't use them up, they will store.

 


The body does not need carbohydrates at all.  Not dietary carbohydrates at least.  The brain does require some glucose though not that much...and can get what is necessary from a conversion of protein called Gluconeogenesis.

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-much-glucose-does-your-br ain-really-need/#axzz1zTytzbdB

This is a good post detailing this.  Your brain at a minimum needs 30 grams of carbohydrates and can run very efficiently with the rest using something called ketones.  Read the article linked for details of how this works.  Very interesting read.

 



For me grains are very very good...the more of them I eat the more weight I lose. I absolutely crave them if I don't have enough, especially bran. I eat cereal in the morning 3-4 times a week since my choices for breakfast without getting sick are strictly lacto-vegetarian. I pick high fiber, high protein bran type whole grain cereals with low fat and low sugar. I also put the original fiber 1 cereal in my yogurt instead of granola for fiber...aka fullness factor.



oh Please-those surgary cereals are bad for you but others like Special K are more healthy. Low in calories and with milk you get your calcium. Like anything too much can be bad for you.



Original Post by: beluomo

#1 Cold cereals in my humble opinion are glorified JUNK food.  They all contain ingredients that kept me fat and unhealthy for far too many years.  Wheat, other grain flours, sugar, and preservatives sabotaged all my weight loss efforts for too long. Corporations are interested in one thing--MONEY. They don't give a rat's behind about me, you, or how fat and sick we get as long as they can con us into thinking thier products are "healthy" and we buy them.

#2 I listen to my own body. If I am hungry-- I eat, if I am not-- I wait. I don't force myself to eat because some self-proclaimed expert insists I must eat breakfast or I must eat 5  times a day.

#3. When I am hungry in the morning I will sometimes have a spinach and mushroom omelet made with one whole egg and 1 egg white along with a serving of fresh citrus fruit.

If I don't want eggs I'll make a wonderful protein rich, fiber rich pumpkin-walnut mousse which is sugar free and low fat.  I will be serving this as dessert this year for Thanksgiving with a squirt of Land O'Lakes sugar free whipped cream which comes in an aerosol can now.)

You mix a 15 oz. can of Libby's 100% pure pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling), one 6 oz. container of Yoplait non-fat, plain GREEK yogurt (it's thick, rich, and has 15 grams of protein), 4 Tblsp. chopped walnuts (or any nuts you prefer), a sprinkle each of ground ginger, ground cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon, and 4-6 packets of STEVIA sweetener to taste. 

This makes 4 half-cup servings. It is OUT OF THIS WORLD!


beluomo - do you bake this mousse or just refrigerate for a while.  it sounds delic !  thanks for sharing.



'your body does not need carbohydrates".....I am seriously going to pretend yopu did not post that. REALLY????

THat is the worst most un accurate statement I have read on this site.

Im not even going to give you a list - plethora-of SCIENTIFIC legitamite, NIH, Johns Hopkins, etc. -pub med- nutritional education sources for dieticians......health professionals, athletes that provide the molecular structure of our physiological make up displaying why we do need carbohydrates and protein and at in our eating.



(my spelling is off but the statement is right.... :P)



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