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How to Juice the Healthy Way


By +Carolyn Richardson on Oct 10, 2012 10:00 AM in Healthy Eating

Stop the presses! Juicing is not a fad diet. In the shadow of the trend of cleansing and fasting, juicing has become synonymous with a short-term, all-or-nothing attempt at quick weight loss or detoxification. On the contrary, juicing the healthy way is about consuming fresh fruits and vegetables a different way. Like steaming is to grilling, juicing can help you enjoy the benefits of certain fruits and vegetables that may be harder to consume or digest whole. Juicing also is a great way to mix the flavors of different produce in unconventional ways. Juicing can help you get a variety of vitamins and minerals through easier digestion and aid in getting adequate amounts of produce into your diet. Without severely altering how you eat, juicing can be another weapon you have up your sleeve for healthier eating.

Don’t Overload on Sugar

The latest dietary guidelines suggest 6 to 13 servings of fruits and vegetables a day. Only about a third of Americans get the requisite amount. A well-balanced fresh-pressed juice should share the same approach of a balanced meal. That starts with being sure not to overdo it with fruit at the expense of the healthfulness of vegetables. Too much added fruit can add more calories and carbs than a whole meal. And because the calories are in a cup, you may be hard-pressed to mind portion control. A good rule of thumb it to limit juice from fruits to less than 6 oz. Balance your fruit juice with a vegetable boost by adding beet greens, celery, spinach, and broccoli. As you get more flexible with juicing, you might also like a complete green juice with little fruit. If you find yours needs some zing, add a squeeze of lemon or lime.

Keep The Fiber

If you buy the right juicer, the healthy fiber that your apple or pear was once made of will end up in the pulp collector. Beyond finding ways to use the pulp, make it a point to make sure you get an adequate amount of fiber when you start juicing. Wash your juice down with a handful of nuts, avocado, or some dry cereal. As far as using the leftover pulp from your juicer, add it to mashed potatoes, pasta dishes, or fruit salads. Be sure to keep certain fruits or vegetables separate so that you don't sacrifice taste. Apple, carrot, and orange pulp works well together. Beet and carrot pulp may be a good addition to cream cheese to add to a whole-grain bagel. The more simple ways to use it includes adding it to soups and stews as well as cereals, bread and muffins. Because juicing fruits and vegetables can get costly, making sure you use the pulp in other ways may help you get your money's worth.

Where’s the Protein?

While a glass of juiced fruits and vegetables can be satiating, it should only act as a snack or light meal. The primary reason is because it lacks protein. Adding protein powder, milk, or yogurt is a common way of adding protein to your juice, but you can also make it a meal by adding two hard-boiled eggs, a slice of cheese with bread, or a serving of beans or meat on the side. If you don't add protein when you juice, don't fret, just be sure you get enough throughout the day. If you're like most Americans, you're in no danger of not getting enough protein. 

The Routine 

Because juicing should not be your only way of eating fresh fruits and vegetables, a good way to enjoy a healthy juicing routine is by limiting juicing to just once a day. Some juice in the morning to get a quick boost of energy, leaving lunch and dinner for getting the fiber, protein, and grains that make up a wholesome diet. If you're known for a sugar craving in the late afternoon, pack juice from time to time to drink after work. It may make your commute home a little smoother.


Your thoughts...

Share how and why you got into juicing and some of your favorite recipes. 




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I love the idea of using the leftover pulp..... I have never considered it. Next time I am going to juice I will make sure to keep the apple and pear pulp for a desert filling, and to thow the carrot pulp into the wok, on top of other vegetables.



When I first got my juicer (about 2 years ago), I embarked on a 28 day juice fast. As described in the beginning of this article, my motivation was weight loss and cleansing, also hoping to break my junk food addiction. After the first couple of weeks, I did finally start to feel energized, however my junk food cravings never disappeared and I ended up falling back into old/bad habits immediately after the fast. However, I believed in the health & nutritional benefits of juicing, and continued to incorporate a daily does of veggie juice into my lifestyle.

My typical juice "recipe" is:

1 large beet

1-2 carrots

1 tomato

1/3 cucumber

1 red, orange or yellow bell pepper

1 clove garlic

1 chunk ginger

1 apple

Sometimes I add a stalk or 2 of celery. I don't add greens any more because (in my juicer, anyway) I find they don't juice very well and most of the veggies end up in the pulp bin. Instead, I add 3-4 cups of kale/spinach/parsley or other greens to my breakfast smoothie (which includes protein powder, fortified vegan "milk" and other goodies). The juice "recipe" above yields 3-4 cups of juice which I consider 2 servings (estimating each serving at ~ 150 cals). I divide it between 2 X 500ml mason jars and top them up with water. I find the juice keeps pretty well for 24 hours, though I realize there would be some nutritional loss by the next day. I love my juicer : )

P.S. Because of the mixture of veggies I use, the pulp doesn't seem appealing as an add-in to my other meals. However, my dog loves it! I mix a good heaping spoonful into both of his daily meals, and I mix it with a little canned food and stuff his Kong toy with it for his daily snack : )

 



Is making fruit smoothies different from juicing? My co-worker makes tons of 'smoothies' out of just veggies and fruits - he gave me a sip and it was not clear, it was full of pieces, which I quite liked.  The fiber seemed to be intact in his concoctions.



There is a BIG RED FLAG here. That is Carrot juice. Carrots are a good source of vitamin A. I had an eye doctor warn me not to drink too much. He said "Eat all of the raw carrots you want, you cannot ingest too much vitamin A that way".

Carrot juice is a non-toxic natural beverage and is one of our primary dietary sources of vitamin A. Drinking excessive amounts of carrot juice may turn your skin orange-yellow, a warning sign that you are ingesting too much vitamin A, but carrot juice is otherwise safe. However, if you are taking excessive amounts of vitamin A in pill or gel cap form, or eating too many foods that contain large amounts of vitamin A, you can develop a rare, potentially fatal illness called chronic hypervitaminosis A, and you will then have to reduce the amount of vitamin A you are ingesting from all sources, including carrot juice.

Vitamin A Foods

A half cup of carrot juice provides 450 percent of your body's daily requirement of vitamin A, according to the U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements. Other foods that offer high levels of vitamin A include spinach, kale, cantaloupe and beef and chicken livers. Vitamin A can also be ingested as a separate dietary supplement through vitamin A tablets and gel caps and multivitamin tablets.

Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/483369-toxicity-of-carrot- juice/



I have given away my juicer and now put the vegetables in the blender, that way I get all the fibre in my morning start up before I walk the dog.  I prepare the veggies the night before.  I like the  taste better and it is very filling.  I add ricotta cheese  or yoghurt for protein.



I use carrot juice pulp in spaghetti sauce. 



Original Post by: alexkansas

There is a BIG RED FLAG here. That is Carrot juice. Carrots are a good source of vitamin A. I had an eye doctor warn me not to drink too much. He said "Eat all of the raw carrots you want, you cannot ingest too much vitamin A that way".

Carrot juice is a non-toxic natural beverage and is one of our primary dietary sources of vitamin A. Drinking excessive amounts of carrot juice may turn your skin orange-yellow, a warning sign that you are ingesting too much vitamin A, but carrot juice is otherwise safe. However, if you are taking excessive amounts of vitamin A in pill or gel cap form, or eating too many foods that contain large amounts of vitamin A, you can develop a rare, potentially fatal illness called chronic hypervitaminosis A, and you will then have to reduce the amount of vitamin A you are ingesting from all sources, including carrot juice.

Vitamin A Foods

A half cup of carrot juice provides 450 percent of your body's daily requirement of vitamin A, according to the U.S. Office of Dietary Supplements. Other foods that offer high levels of vitamin A include spinach, kale, cantaloupe and beef and chicken livers. Vitamin A can also be ingested as a separate dietary supplement through vitamin A tablets and gel caps and multivitamin tablets.

Source: http://www.livestrong.com/article/483369-toxicity-of-carrot- juice/


I prefer to just blend all my chopped up veggies and fruit in a blender with water, milk or juice 9depends on what i am making). All the fiber stays intacted and I find it more filling.

 



A great way to re-use pulp is with a dehydrator. Put the pulp into some flax crackers and dry them on the dehydrator, delicious, crunchy and healthy!!!



I recently got a "NutriBullet" by the Magic Bullet people, which completely pulverizes the whole product so that all the fiber is included, there is no waste or leftover pulp.  The "smoothies" come out completely smooth, even with hard fiber like kale stems, almonds, orange peels. I love love love my morning Nutriblast! I use spinach, kale, either banana or avocado for creaminess, whatever fruits I have on hand, plus almonds, flax seeds, chia seeds, goji berries and other healthful additions. I know that products from infomercials can seem suspect, but I think this one is the real deal!



Juicers seem to take too much out for the huge amount I put in.

Protein is available in ample amounts in green vegetables and nuts. Adding spinach, kale or broccoli will add protein. You can add a lot of spinach since it has a mild flavor and grinds well.

I use veggies in my morning smoothies and add in home made almond butter, cashew butter, sunflower seeds or walnuts. Using too much dairy can pose other health risks (other than the whole lactose intolerance bit) so I use coconut milk or almond milk, just enough to smooth it out - maybe 1/4 cup. I also add two tablespoons of ground flax seed to my shakes.  Using strong flavored fruits can help temper any added veggies if you like it sweet. My personal fave is strawberry banana spinach almond butter. But I also enjoy pineapple flavors like pineapple, raspberry, papaya, kale.

If you're still curious about protein intake and sources of protein some good books are Eat to Live and The China Study. :)



A great energy recipe for a juicer is 1)organic kale 2)spinach 3)a few carrots 4)celery 5)2 or 3 Fiji apples 6)romaine lettuce I call it the green machine, and see great energy boosts throughout the day. I consume 12oz every morning.

In the Vitamix I enjoy this 1)couple slabs of pineapple 2)watercress 3)Dinosaur kale 4)spinach 5)half an apple 6)bit of romaine 7)protein powder 8)flax seeds 9)hemp seed hearts So good, complete meal replacement that is fulfilling. Usually make two portions, drink one immediately save the other half for later. Try putting in a few ice cubes and some almond milk to vary consistency. Enjoy!!!


We, in Health Education, have a mantra: "Eat, don't drink, your fruits and vegetables!" It's much easier and healthier to eat an apple with its skin than to pull out the juicer and make apple juice. Whole fruits and vegetables fill the stomach and create satiety in a way that juices do not. Juices are a sure way to unwittingly add extra calories and miss out on the benefits of natural fibers. They are often used to replace sodas but contain virtually the same amount of calories ounce for ounce!



Original Post by: Barbery

We, in Health Education, have a mantra: "Eat, don't drink, your fruits and vegetables!" It's much easier and healthier to eat an apple with its skin than to pull out the juicer and make apple juice. Whole fruits and vegetables fill the stomach and create satiety in a way that juices do not. Juices are a sure way to unwittingly add extra calories and miss out on the benefits of natural fibers. They are often used to replace sodas but contain virtually the same amount of calories ounce for ounce!


Yeah, but it's harder to eat kale, spinach, an apple, a carrot and a broccoli crown raw in one snack than it is to pop them in a blender.

It may amount to the same calories as a soda, but certainly not sugar or caffiene



Warning to all juicers and smoothie-ersSmile:  Avoid using raw kale, broccoli, and other cruciferous vegetables if you have an underactive thyroid.  These vegetables are thyroid-suppressing to people who have hypothyroidism.



One side effect of juicing I found the hard way was that my hair started falling out a few months after I started juicing:( even my kids hair aswell, I juiced for them thinking I wanted to give them the benifits of the nutrients but they are 10 & 14 year old girls that was not to happy with the hair issue. I still juice dispute the hair loss for my self because it helps with my menapossl side effects monthly lessen the headaches even:) happy juicing everyone.


Original Post by: beckya59

I recently got a "NutriBullet" by the Magic Bullet people, which completely pulverizes the whole product so that all the fiber is included, there is no waste or leftover pulp.  The "smoothies" come out completely smooth, even with hard fiber like kale stems, almonds, orange peels. I love love love my morning Nutriblast! I use spinach, kale, either banana or avocado for creaminess, whatever fruits I have on hand, plus almonds, flax seeds, chia seeds, goji berries and other healthful additions. I know that products from infomercials can seem suspect, but I think this one is the real deal!


I have a NutriBullet also! It is 100% better than a juicer. I gave my juicer to the Goodwill!



I saw the ads for nutribullet right AFTER buying my juicer (sigh).  I watched fat, sick and nearly dead and sold me on the juicer.  I have a blender and was interested in the nutribullet, my blender was $8, nutribullet is over $100, is it worth it? Is it that much better of a blender?

 

Also I'm very curious and surprised at the member that reported hair loss!  There must be a constant offensive ingredient in there, because I can't fathom how fruits and vegetables (nutrition) could make one's hair fall out, I'd more expect that from malnutrition.



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