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Managing Your Emotions: Name That Feeling


By +Diane Petrella on May 06, 2010 11:00 AM in Dieting & You

By Diane Petrella, MSW

If you’re like most dieters, you sometimes use food to cope with difficult feelings. Instead of only eating when physically hungry, you may turn to food when emotionally vulnerable. Understanding what emotional eating means is a great first step!  The next step is to ask yourself, “What am I feeling?” and instead of turning to food, ask, “What do I need?”  Here’s a guideline to help you identify and manage your feelings so they’re not managing you.  

Name Your Feelings

Use the following four key words to identify what you’re feeling and to find the right strategy to experience relief. Transfer the list of feelings and related strategies to an index card to easily carry with you. Add additional ways of coping that have worked for you in the past. Writing creates clarity and reinforces your commitment to change. And you’ll have a handy tool to use when necessary. Use the Stop-Breathe-Reflect-Choose strategy to further help you interrupt the emotional eating cycle.

SAD – MAD – GLAD – SCARED

Feelings can be identified within four broad categories. When you know you’re about to eat for reasons other than hunger, ask yourself “Am I sad, mad, glad or scared?” Then review the list of feelings associated with that category. When you’ve identified what you’re feeling, allow yourself to first experience the emotion without denying it or pushing it away. But if that becomes too difficult, practice using new coping strategies, instead of food, to experience some relief. There are no good or bad feelings. All feelings are ok. It’s what we do with them that matters. Four categories of feelings and suggestions for managing them follow.

SAD

Blue, unhappy, glum, dissatisfied, dejected, lonely, disappointed, guilty, ashamed, hurt, isolated, miserable, heartbroken, gloomy, depressed, despairing, grief-stricken, melancholic, hopeless, helpless, distressed, rejected, abandoned, alone, empty.

Comfort Yourself:  Write your feelings in a journal; talk with a trusted friend; have a good cry and allow your tears to release the sadness; drink a soothing beverage like a cup of herbal tea; read from an inspirational book or magazine; pray; repeat a comforting affirmation like “I allow these feelings to wash through me and I open to the peace within”; wrap yourself in a blanket and rest; take a walk; be in nature; work on a craft project; listen to soothing music; watch a funny movie; watch a sad movie as that may help you release your feelings and provide relief.

MAD

Angry, bitter, frustrated, annoyed, irritated, exasperated, livid, loathing, disgusted, hostile, hate, aggravated, defensive, enraged, infuriated, furious, resentment, irate, outraged, antagonistic, mean, aggressive, rage

Calm Yourself:  Do something physical to release built up tension from your body, e.g.,  take a brisk walk outdoors, walk up and down stairs, vigorous cleaning like vacuuming or washing a bathtub or floors; talk with a friend; write a letter expressing your mad feelings without intending to send it (this is only advisable if you can comfortably release your feelings without exacerbating them); pray; listen to calming music; do a word puzzle or another detail oriented activity as a way of creating structure; breathe to the count of ten and repeat as necessary until you feel calmer; repeat affirming words as you breathe and with each inhalation say to yourself, “Calm” and with each exhalation say, “Let go”.  

GLAD

Happy, elated, delighted, cheerful, loving, hopeful, appreciative, satisfied, joyful, excited, peaceful, enthusiastic, pleased, proud, caring, grateful, carefree, confident, secure, nurturing, content, blissful, ecstatic, relief, thankful

Celebrate Yourself: Share your uplifting feelings with a friend; write down your feelings to reinforce them; sit quietly by yourself and relish in this glorious state; buy yourself flowers; buy flowers for a friend and share your happiness; start a fun hobby you don’t often take the time to do.

SCARED

Anxious, panicky, afraid, nervous, worried, frightened, terrified, fearful, uneasy, apprehensive, concerned, insecure, vulnerable, weak, unsettled, tense, edgy, upset, confused, shocked, overwhelmed, pressured, unsure, trapped, cautious, suspicious

Compose Yourself: Use this grounding technique to settle yourself:  Sit or stand straight with both feet placed firmly on the ground and your shoulders back and square. If sitting, hold firmly onto the sides of the chair. Breathe steadily for as long as necessary to begin to neutralize the intensity of your feelings. Unless your safety requires immediate attention, affirm and repeat to yourself, “I am safe” or “in this moment all is well”. Do something physical to release stress as both angry and anxious states produce tightness and tension in the body, e.g., take a brisk walk, climb stairs, vacuum, wash floors. De-clutter a closet or drawer because when you organize your outer world you organize your inner world. Talk with a trusted friend to help put things in perspective.

Boredom is Not a Feeling

If you eat when bored the problem isn’t simply the lack of an interesting activity to occupy your time. Unless you’re trapped in an unrelentingly dull routine, chronic boredom signifies an underlying lethargy and lack of interest often associated with depression. If you often “feel bored” ask yourself what you are truly feeling and then use an appropriate strategy, instead of food, to cope.

Get  Support

The suggestions above are not a substitute for professional counseling to deal with chronic states of sadness, depression, anger, rage, anxiety and panic. If you struggle with these feelings on a consistent basis give yourself the gift of support and seek out a therapist or life coach to assist you.

 


Your thoughts....

What strategies can you add to the list?

Diane Petrella, MSW is a psychotherapist and life coach. She offers her clients a spiritual approach to weight loss and helps them develop a loving, respectful relationship with their bodies. Receive a free copy of Diane’s Seven Easy & Effortless Weight Loss Secrets by signing up for her monthly e-newsletter, Living Lightly, for spiritual insights and tips to release weight with confidence and love.  To contact Diane directly visit her website at www.dianepetrella.com 

 



Comments


that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx



I am with you on the tired question too.  The obvious answer is sleep, but that is not always possible.

I think this blog entry is  a great tool.  I think I will print and post as a reminder.  This is not new info to me, but it is a great reminder, as it is easy to slip out of using these techniques.  We should be teaching our children how to identify and appropriatley deal with their feelings in the same way too! 



Maybe you can find a healthy food that can give you more energy, or a vitamin rich smoothie to curb the apetite that claws at you when you are tired....

I really have no idea, I don't eat when I'm tired... I usually just get frustrated and then I eat!



Original Post by: ahmad357

that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx


You raise an important point, ahmad357, as I'm sure many other people overeat when tired.

Tired is not included in this outline, however, because it is not an emotional feeling, but rather, a physical state. The most obvious suggestion to anyone when tired is to rest. But, you understandably can't do that when you're working! I would suggest that you look over the various strategies above to see what may help while at work. And, even though you feel tired perhaps a bit of exercise may help to counteract that and, in fact, provide some energy. Maybe walking up several flights of stairs or, if you can take a quick break, a five minute walk outside?

I will defer to the dieticians reading this because I'm sure there are some foods to eat that will provide you with energy rather than snacks that will later leave you feeling sluggish.

Best wishes!
Diane



I come home from school in the evening sometimes, tired, stressed out and HUNGRY...after 9pm, usually. This is after being at school in classes that I am not interested in from 9 in the morning til 9 at night. I have to deal with this only for a couple more weeks and then the semester, and this particular issue, will end. What can I do? I m usually CRAZY hungry!



(continued from earlier comment) To add to everything, the day I spend the most time at school coincides with one of my regularly scheduled early morning boot camp exercise sessions (we meet at local parks to run, lift weights and do pliometric exercises and calesthenics at 5:30 am). I am not giving up boot camp, since I can see my body going through positive changes, but it leaves me hungrier than on days when I don't have boot camp.



Now there's an affirming article that helps me.  Thanks.  I use 'all of the above'.  I find journalling to be the most therapeutic, but I accompany that with surrounding myself with life; a walk on the exercise path, a bike ride through town, opening up the windows and doors and allowing the sounds of life to surround me, and then positive self-talk.  But there are still times when I just feel the need for carbohydrates to settle down my anxiousness.  At those times, I have learned that whole wheat bread with sugar-free blackberry jam keeps me from overeating and also helps to bring my emotions back to sanity-level.   But again, I use 'all of the above' and could write a paragraph on how each has helped me to cope with my dangling feelings' rather than to eat.   One other thing that helps is reminding myself that when I finish eating, I will simply feel bad because I diminished my health, and my emotions will get worse.



Yes, your last sentence really hit home for me.  The self question I learned on this site really helps, "how will I feel in an hour" . . .  If I overeat now . . . If I have those seconds I want but don't need . . . If I just eat to eat!  One of my biggest problems has been just mindless eating.



I tend to get anxious about my personal and professional workload.  When my to-do list rattles around in my head (so that I don't forget what I need to get done) it makes me feel like I have even MORE tasks than I actually have as each task floats through my conciousness repeatedly.  So keeping detailed to-do lists, shopping lists, etc., really helps to reduce my anxiety, and takes away that overwhelmed feeling.  I just have to get it out of my head and onto paper (or onto my computer).  It's amazing how much calmer I feel.

Listening to relaxing music really helps with anxiety, also.  I actually started taking piano lessons recently, and now that I am over the initial anxiety (ironic!) of learning new pieces and playing in front of people, I find it very relaxing and grounding.  It clears my mind because it requires so much concentration to play.  Kind of like an active form of meditation.

As for sadness, I was surprised to see one of my favorite coping strategies listed here!  I have been very upset that my youngest son's school (for disabled children) will be closing.  I had a "knot" in my chest for a long time.  I finally sat myself down and watched "Schindler's List" with a box of kleenex next to me and cried buckets.  I felt a LOT better after that.  It also helped me to put things into perspective.

My husband has been a runner for many years.  That is his favorite way of dealing with stress or anger.  If he can't run due to an injury or busy schedule, he tend to get cranky.  So physical activity is a great stress-buster, and I really need to follow his example!!!!



Completely in agreement about the "tired" comment. And the problem is that when I'm tired, I drink more caffeine, which makes me more prone to eating, too. Would love to hear more strategies about dealing with tiredness when extra sleep is not possible. As a woman in my mid-40s, I'm acutely aware of this connection, as even when I have enough hours to devote to sleep I often do not sleep well due to what I believe are perimenopause symptoms. I really think lack of quality sleep is at least in part a cause of "middle-age spread" at least in women....Any thoughts/advice?



Understood Ahmad, but a little planning can go a long, long ways in situations like yours.  I too work at a hospital/clinic where the day is long and breaks are generally short.  I've found that eating the typical breakfast-lunch-dinner routine is just not enough, and I feel "tired" mostly between lunch and dinner.  I've chosen to limit my caloric intake to approximately 1200-1300 calories a day - BUT I PLAN to eat something every 2 hours. 

Breakfast is at 8 (I have packets of hot cereal at my desk & bring in a boiled egg), snack @ 10 (an apple and a low fat cheese stick), lunch @ noon (a turkey wrap, and some celery & carrot sticks - maybe even a salad too), snack @ 2pm (fiber one yogurt, cucumber slices, & carrot sticks), snack @ 4pm (fiber bar, celery), dinner & dessert @ approx 6pm (chicken breast, green steamed vegetables, and a salad, a cup of strawberries, a few blackberries, and another fiber one yogurt). 

I'm very careful not to leave the house in the morning w/o a dietary plan for the day and my food all packed in a cooler.  Obviously I've got my job to do at work - haha, but eating a snack only takes a couple of minutes and it does wonders for my energy levels!  Keep your tank full - you may truly feel hungry 2 hrs after a carb heavy lunch...plan on it - have something healthy at hand to munch on, so you don't keep perpetuating the carb cycle.



I made an envelope with different activities and whenever I start to feel like binging, I pull a slip of paper from the EEE (emotional eating envelope) and perform that activity :) Examples: walking, shopping, watch a movie, take a shower, take a drive, blow bubbles, read a book, etc.



Original Post by: ahmad357

that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx


Sounds like the tiredness is an insuling induced blood sugar crash.

 

I had same symptoms until I eliminated simple sugars and simple carbs from my diet.

 

Ensuring I take complex whole grain carbs and only fruit sugars in my diet freed me formt he up and down blood sugar roller coaster and over a few weeks time eliminated the tiredness and food cravings.

 

Do I miss the sweets and breads and white rice in my diet?  Do I miss the chocolate in my diet?

 

I really don't miss any of it.  And I am really happy I don't have the cravings for them either. 

 

And if you had told me to give the stuff up before I did finally give it up I would have looked at you like you had three heads on your shoulders as I was sooo addicted to the stuff.  All previous diets before simply had less of the same foods and dieting was an immense act of sheer will power to resist eating more of the foods I craved.

 

Dieting is a shear breeze now for me as I have lost 41 lbs eating 1800 calories a day and no cravings and perfectly food satisfied all day long.  I can easily forsee sticking ot this idet plan just as long as it takes and I doubt I will return to previous food choices once I reach target weight of 175.  I will simply add a fe more whole grain food choices to current diet to meat energy needs but keep same food choices.

 

Freedom from food addiction is great.



I'm glad so many of you are finding this article helpful. Thank you for your comments!

Changeforholly - thanks for again mentioning a suggestion I made in an earlier article on emotional eating. When  struggling with emotional eating, ask yourselves, "How do I want to feel one hour from now?" When we link with a future picture of how we want to be we more easily make decisions from the perspective of where we're headed rather than from where we are. This helps us stay focused on our goals and is like a magnet drawing us to what we want.

Theresa83, thank you for highlighting an important stategy like watching a sad movie to release sad feelings. It's important to allow ourselves the space to feel what we're feeling and not push feelings away. Think of it as creating a nurturing container for  the feelings, like a child that just needs to be held while crying. The more you "hold"  and comfort yourself with your feelings, the more able you are to tolerate it, not act on it and allow it to  naturally release in an adaptive way.

Warmly,
Diane



Original Post by: karenmcgady

(continued from earlier comment) To add to everything, the day I spend the most time at school coincides with one of my regularly scheduled early morning boot camp exercise sessions (we meet at local parks to run, lift weights and do pliometric exercises and calesthenics at 5:30 am). I am not giving up boot camp, since I can see my body going through positive changes, but it leaves me hungrier than on days when I don't have boot camp.


When you expect a period of strenuous excercise, (boot camp definately qualifies) it's important to prepare your body with an adequate breakfast.  Take in protien and carbs for the extra energy you'll be expending.  After the workout your body will need to repair.  You need to stay hydrated but also provide your body with first aid food; Milk is great or an energy bar with the protien and carbs necessary to rebuild the muscles and give you the energy for the rest of your day.  Remember, you're jumpstarting your metabolism so your body continues to burn more energy during the day.  Additionally, if you have not had enough quality sleep time or you are mildly dehydrated, a state most of us share, these sensations are often confused with hunger.  Before you eat, listen to your body.  What does it want? You'll be suprised how much a glass of water will improve your afternoon focus. Eat early, drink water, feel better.



Original Post by: emilisha

I made an envelope with different activities and whenever I start to feel like binging, I pull a slip of paper from the EEE (emotional eating envelope) and perform that activity :) Examples: walking, shopping, watch a movie, take a shower, take a drive, blow bubbles, read a book, etc.


Awhile back I made a "snack attack jar" it has a label that says..frusterated, mad, happy, sad, bored, stressed, etc and inside are similar slips of paper ....but things I can do at work...go for a walk, call a  friend, look at a magazine for 5 mins, plan something fun, pray, make someone else smile, etc.  Just another way to integrate these principals into my life.



Original Post by: ahmad357

that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx


Perhaps it's not so much that you're tired but that your metabolism is telling you it's slowing down because it hasn't eaten in a while.  Also, what kinds of things are you eating? Is it a good variety of energy rich foods?  Maybe try smaller meals and energy rich snacks to help keep your metabolism revved? I'm by no means an expert, so just sharing things that help me from feeling the same way. :)



I am feeling kind of frustrated right now - at not having enough time in the day to get everything done.  To top it off there are two giant trays of danishes, bagels and muffins in my tiny office (from a training seminar that I am working on) and so far I have avoided them.  A minor loss of willpower at this point could result in me literally finishing off several bagels, muffins and danishes.  I have a sweet tooth that has no boundaries and the fact that my stomach is full from lunch and I still have an orange to eat is no barrier to wanting what's on that tray.  I am powerless over my addiction to carbs and sugar.  It's a feeling of "I may in this lifetime never eat again, so I have to eat as many bagels and muffins as possible."  So irrational and so addicted. 

Help!!!!



Despinamb - It possible for you to remove said temptation, so you don't feel like the focus in your office is looming over you?

 



Re: "Feeling Tired"

Physical feelings, or sensations, happen in reaction to your outer and inner environment.  They include feeling tired, cold, hot, thirsty, hungry, have to pee, pain, soreness, muscle exhaustion, dehydration, etc. etc. 

Calorie Count members are correct to say that glucose intolerance (aka pre-diabetes, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, Syndrome X) may have a role, and so frequent feedings and cutting out simple sugars may help and are worth a try, but there are many other reasons for tiredness, such as skimping on sleep, sleep apnea, depression, anemia (or iron overload), thyroid issue, medication side-effects, allergies, and the list goes on.  Perhaps your doctor can find a medical reason.

But many of us stuff too many things into a day and we sacrifice sleep for it. If that applies to you, and your tiredness is the rule rather than the exception, then you might have to decide what is most important and adapt your lifestyle.  Either way, food does provide energy when we're tired, but it comes with a price.  Read how the research shows that lack of sleep is related to overweight in this past blog, Sleep More, Eat Less.

 



Fantastic article; I am printing it to carry with me and read a few times throughout the day as I carry on activities.  For anxious and scared feelings, I find yoga to be calming and grounding.  Also, running / jogging is always a great way to "run away" from feelings, with a pointer to come back to thinking about the situation in a way not cluttered with overwhelming emotion.

In Al-Anon, H.A.L.T. is one acronym frequently used.  (Hungry? Angry? Lonely? Tired?)  Paying attention to these and addressing your needs is helpful.  To the previous writer who asked about "tired":  Make sure that you get enough sleep, take a nap when tired, yoga has specific breathing exercises for quick energy, a couple of cups of strong green tea, a short, brisk jog or fast walk to help muscles release stored glucose are suggestions.  It is natural for the body to crave a sweet if you are awake and needing to rest -- sleep replenishes neurotransmitter levels, but in lieu of that, sugar gives quick energy.  A lower fat protein snack and skim milk or grapefruit juice snack may help raise blood sugar (and so does exercise!).



Two comments:  I know not everyone has time to exercise at lunch time, which is the best thing if you can.  I too work in a Hospital but fortunate for me, I can take my breaks and lunch whenever I want.  I have just begun walking 30 minutes every lunch.  On days when I cannot do that outside, I joined our Hospital's gym - will get on the treadmill on those days.  So if at all possible, to anyone who is tired at work - try, try, try, to get in some form of exercise (even if it is only for 15 minutes), you will notice a huge difference in your afternoons.

Thanks "emilisha" I love the EEE envelope idea - will start my envelope up tonite!  Great idea!!!!



Original Post by: ahmad357

that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx


that's perfect because when you're tired you have no motivation to plan healthy meals, etc.



I often crave something sweet after a meal.  I don't know what that "emotion" is, unless it's a feeling that I deserve it.....pride??   It's like it's a habit similar to wanting a cigarette after a meal.  I try to eat some fruit to satify the craving.  But, let's face it.....healthy sugar is not the same as that cookie or piece of pie or cake.



Original Post by: anginwi

Despinamb - It possible for you to remove said temptation, so you don't feel like the focus in your office is looming over you?

 


I have been trying to leave the office periodically and avoid walking by it.  So far, so good.  But what is this compulsion?  I think it's also hormonal today.  I'm not always so helpless around food and actually I have exercised pretty good willpower - I had 1/2 of an oatmeal cookie as my mid-afternoon snack.  But  you are right - the further one is away from temptation the better.  Thanks for your comment! I'm going to leave for home soon and go running.



Years ago I went on that "Pill Diet".  Worked, but as soon as I was done the pills, the weight started coming back on slowly.  So never again for that!  BUT, it did teach me one really important thing that I still do to this day!   PLAN AHEAD. 

When you have a moment (weekend, nighttime, whenever) - grab a calender and write on each day what is for supper - I do this for at least a month at a time.  I don't write in the staples, ie:  salad, rice, veggie - just what the main meal is for that night.  This way the night before, I look and see chicken tomorrow, then I pull it out!  Easier to shop when you know what are cooking........I get teased endlessly by my sisters "because I am way too organized".  Yes, I am .......... but it prevents me from having the quick, processed food meals!! 



Original Post by: emilisha

I made an envelope with different activities and whenever I start to feel like binging, I pull a slip of paper from the EEE (emotional eating envelope) and perform that activity :) Examples: walking, shopping, watch a movie, take a shower, take a drive, blow bubbles, read a book, etc.


Good idea.  I took your idea and tweeked it a bit.  I made a list of all the emotions and the sub-categories listed here on one index card, and then made 4 index cards for each emotion and on each card listed the actvity suggestions.



ah funny. right after reading this blog I went on a binge a few hours later.... bah lol



Tired at work ideas that I use to combat being tired at work.  Pick one per hour, and rotate through them as often as needed:

  1. 5 minute walk outside - rain or shine!
  2. 3 minute deep relaxation/meditation
  3. 2 minutes of stretching exersizes
  4. Drink cold water instead of coffee

Cool



Original Post by: ahmad357

that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx


the reason why you are going for calorie dense food when you are tired is b/c your body perceives tired as a lack of enery a.k.a. a lack of calories. Plan your time wisely. Are you watching an hour or two of t.v. at night rather than getting to bed early? Try reading or writing in a journal to unwind and fall asleep faster. I've nver really been one to journal, but if I have a lot on my mind then I write it down. It empties and quiets my mind so that I can get to sleep.

P.S. I don't own a t.v. The only t.v. i watch is on a cardio maching at the gym. One of the best life changes i ever made!



I Frown also experience this.

 I work about the same hours sometimes longer. I too crave sweets between 02:00 -3 pm, also the middle of the night, if the dog wants out, I will go in the kitchen and stuff something in my mouth before going to bed.

any suggestions, are greatly appreciated



it is ok to have a small snack before bed as long as it is factored into your daily calories. Cottage cheese with berries is a great bed time snack. Cottage cheese has a protein called casein which is slow digesting. It will keep you full through out the night. The fresh berries will satisfy that sweet tooth. If you are not a fan of cottage cheese than you can purchase casaein protein powder and either just have the protein shake with water or add fresh berries and make it a smoothie. The smoothie is for those who like the idea of a treat at the end of the day. Again, these calories need to be factored in as part of your daily calories otherwise you're adding another 200+ calories to your day.

Keep in mind that if you are eating small, healthy meals/snack every 3 hours than you are keeping insulin levels even (not creating insulin drops or spike which triggers hunger) and you should not be feeling that 2-3pm lull. make sure you are getting clean carbs in at each meal....carbs = energy! But they must be clean carbs. Refined carbs cause insulin spikes and you will be hungry an hour later.



I drink at least 70 oz of water a day, so I am probably not dehydrated. I can't eat much before boot camp because then I get nauseated, so I drink a protein shake afterwards (I think milk is completely gross!) I try to take nutritious, filling foods with me to school, but that's kind of difficult to plan, since time is at a premium right now and so I'm REALLY hungry be the end of classes! HELP!!!!!



Original Post by: terracotta101

it is ok to have a small snack before bed as long as it is factored into your daily calories. Cottage cheese with berries is a great bed time snack. Cottage cheese has a protein called casein which is slow digesting. It will keep you full through out the night. The fresh berries will satisfy that sweet tooth. If you are not a fan of cottage cheese than you can purchase casaein protein powder and either just have the protein shake with water or add fresh berries and make it a smoothie. The smoothie is for those who like the idea of a treat at the end of the day. Again, these calories need to be factored in as part of your daily calories otherwise you're adding another 200+ calories to your day.

Keep in mind that if you are eating small, healthy meals/snack every 3 hours than you are keeping insulin levels even (not creating insulin drops or spike which triggers hunger) and you should not be feeling that 2-3pm lull. make sure you are getting clean carbs in at each meal....carbs = energy! But they must be clean carbs. Refined carbs cause insulin spikes and you will be hungry an hour later.


Great tips!

My roommate also introduced me to vanilla milk (instead of chocolate milk) which is a great healthy sleep-inducing bedtime snack.

1 cup warm skim milk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon brown sugar (or sweetner of your choice)
1 dash of cinnamon

It's only 100 calories and gets you close to 1/3 of your calcium for the day!  (And I think it's really delicious)



I would think but could be wrong that being in boot camp is burning alot of calories, I would imagine you are not overweight, and are probably hungry as you should be.



I forgot about this, and have done this with Vanill Silk reduced calorie and nutmeg. Thanks for the reminder.

 

Much love to all, and a pleasant happy healthy weekend.



you say that you are packing filling foods. I would have to look at what it is you're eating and when you are eating it. As for finding time to take food...It takes me 30 min the night before to prep the next day's meals. I carry my meals with me in a cooler bag so I can throw an ice pack in there and keep it cool. Eating out or cafeteria food is NOT an options...it leaves you open to temptation and poor choices. As far as saying you don't have time to prepare meals. The alternative is to be hungry the next day or feel guilty b/c you grabbed something on the go that perhaps wasn't a good choice.

We only have 24 hours in our day. We cannot get more than that, but we can decide where to allocate our time. There will always be someone wanting something from us or something we "should" be doing. Just remember, you are the only one that can take care of you and your needs.



What about using food to relax?  is there there a mind/body connection with seratonin.  Eg: using carbs to increase seratonin to relax.



i myself find myself eating after i told myself i wouldn't eat. for instance i'll be like " i need to stop eating so much. okay, no more snacking!" then literally i go down stairs straight to the kitchen. ironically i feel that i eat because of low self esteem so the eating makes me feel better.



Original Post by: ahmad357

that's a really great blog, but how about tired ? I emotionally eat when I'm real tired cuz I work in a OR and I have really long working hours "7am to 5pm" so after lunch, "1pm" I usually still feel hungry and craving for sweet foods like chocolate and biscuits. So I go binge on those and have like a bar of chocolate, and some biscuits even though i had lunch two hours ago!

Shouldn't be there a "tired" category ? and how can we cope with this ?

thx


I find drinking a bottle of water helps. Water helps wake you up AND you get that hand to mouth motion as if you are eating! A friend of mine suggested this to me when his doctor recommended it to him. It has helped us both.



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I would be sure I was eating protein and a bit of fat with each small meal to stop this yoyo effect from carbs. Carbs do make you feel more energetic for a time, but a couple of hours later you crash, to start the cycle again. I used to do this to my body but understanding the "carb junkie" mentality/craving helped me get over this. Nuts, especially almonds are a great snack.


I call what I'm feeling depressed - hopeless, devoid of energy, you name it. I don't feel like eating at all, and I certainly don't have energy to choose food wisely. Just trying to make it through the day...



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