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Calorie Count Blog

Perception and High Fructose Corn Syrup


By Mary_RD on Aug 31, 2010 10:00 AM in Tips & Updates
Edited By +Rachel Berman

The public has spoken. Consumer demand for high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has dropped. According to latest figures from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, consumer demand decreased 11 percent between 2003 and 2008.  HFCS is blamed for the rise in obesity, diabetes, and other weight-related medical problems.  But is the connection cause-and-effect or guilt-by-association?

The great American sweet tooth

The sad fact is that Americans love their sugar. Three quarters of the sweeteners that enter our bodies are in the form of prepared foods, including soft drinks, candy, cereals, catchup, salad dressing, and the list goes on and on.

Sweetness is supplied by HFCS and other sugars, such as sucrose (cane), beet sugar, maple sugar, honey, and malt, and those with names only food processors know, like invert sugar, maltodextrins and others. Presently, yearly consumption of all sugars averages 147 pounds across the population and of that number, 53.1 pounds are from added HFCS. 

From whence it came

Enzyme technology that drove the hydrolysis of glucose to fructose resulted in the commercialization high-fructose corn syrup in 1967.  As sugar prices rose, food and beverage manufacturers replaced more and more cane and beet sugar with HFCS.  But price was not the only reason for substitution; HFCS is simply sweeter. An article in Amber Waves, a publication of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, notes, "industry analysts report that, on a sweetness equivalent/dry basis, HFCS-42 (one of the blends of HFCS) cost an average of 13.6 cents per pound in 2005, while the price of wholesale refined beet sugar averaged 29.5 cents per pound."  Also worth noting: crop subsidies made to corn growers kept the price of HFCS low.

The scientific argument

Most scientists find little difference between HFCS and table sugar.  Table sugar is 50% glucose and 50% fructose, while the HFCS used in baked goods contains 58% glucose and 42% fructose. The HFCS used in beverages have a 45% glucose and 55% fructose distribution.

At issue is whether the digestion, absorption and metabolism of fructose differs from glucose.  Unlike glucose, fructose does not stimulate the production of insulin and appetite-suppressing leptin. Those hormones regulate the appetite and so, without them, over-consumption is favored.  In addition, excess fructose leads to more unhealthy triglycerides and greater fat storage in the viscera and in liver.  The argument is covered in a commentary to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

But, still, there is no indisputable scientific evidence that high fructose corn syrup consumption causes obesity or diseases in humans and lab rats.  In fact, rat research uses pure fructose in large amounts, which is not part of the human diet.  And let's not forget that table sugar is half fructose.

The public opinion

Many Americans dislike HFCS for non-health reasons: the corn used is often genetically modified, they are not happy about cell and tissue damage in vetro, and the politics and environmental impact of intensive corn production are a concern.  They are not waiting for scientific conclusions; they are speaking with their wallets now.  But at the same time HFCS consumption dropped, sugar refining increased by about 7 percent.  

The Bottom Line:  Instead of focusing on HFCS, how about reducing the consumption of all sugar?  In nature, sweetness from ripe fruit, vegetables, and milks is expected to be enough.  Besides calories, sugar has almost no nutritional value.  It promotes tooth decay and its yummy taste leads to overeating, which may turn out to be a physical addiction.  Would we eat half the food we polish off if not for its sweet taste?  Let's face it: the sweet stuff goes down easy, whether or not corn is to blame.


Your thoughts....

Is HFCS a villain in your home?  How about table sugar?



Comments


HFCS goes hand in hand with processed foods. Which in my opinion is the bottom line. Eat whole foods. The trouble is that no one has time to prepare them. We must demand better quality foods that are manufactured locally. That way they won't need so many food stabilzers to prolong the shelf life. It's all about greed. The companies don't want to suffer any loss so they pump the food full of additives to make them cheap and last long.



It's easy to forget that we simply eat too much.  However, HFCS is a culprit in the "fattening" of America.  I believe that is indisputable. 

Eat less, exercise more. 



What I have discovered personally is that the more I limit foods with added sweetener--whether it be sugar, hfcs, Splenda--the more satisfied my sweet tooth is with fruit.  Once you acquire a taste for overly, unnaturally sweet foods, the sweetness in an apple doesn't say "dessert" to your tastebuds.  By the same taken, if you will take the time to change your taste, after a while many excessively sweetened foods will be almost sickening.  That said, when I do indulge in sweetened foods, I avoid hfcs like the plague.



I generally avoid sugar in all forms on the most major part of my day. I do indulge in some for breakfast. I usually have a cappuccino and a biscuit. Something not too sweet, lower calorie. I generally don't eat many fruits, because they give me digestive problems. But I do need something sweet in my day, and if I don't make an allowance, I end up with a bar of dark chocolate in my hand and just eat it in one go. I rarely have one of those really sweet chocolates, because they are just too sweet. I really think they became sweeter in the past years.

Anyway, I think the issue with sugar is that like all things, in moderation it's okay. If you are like me and just can't live without it, then emotionally it is better if you just put aside some of your daily calories for it. A little a day is fine and you avoid binging. Also, if you have it for breakfast, you can work it off by the end of the day and it even gives you an energy boost. Plus you can go through your day with the secure knowledge that you already treated yourself, so you can say no to all sources of chocolate you come across. Plus, you can have extra motivation for working out as you had your reward before doing anything for it, so you'd better make good on your promise to yourself. Does this make sense? Or is my logic a bit convoluted?



I do not understand why there is a reluctance or outright denial that HFCS, added sugars, hormones, MSG, growth-stimulating additives to consumption animals' feed, antibiotics and chemical additives in general are only minimally "speculated" as causing the obesity epidemic and severe liver damage as well as damaging other organs.  Chosing whole, natural foods while eliminating chemically enhanced and altered foods wherever they come from is necessary not only for your health but to hopefully change the direction the food industry is going.  Do a little research on your own so that you can make proper choices for yourself and your family.  



I prefer foods that contain real sugar over HFCS. I use raw sugar 95% of the time.

The more primitive your food intake, the better.

I can find the time to eat healthy, fresh foods, but it is not easy, and most of the time it is not "convenient".

I remember in grade school, we were taught the three basic needs of human survival; food, water and shelter.

How can we afford not to eat fresh healthy food, regardless of the cost, or time involved.

I am convinced that if you don't have the time or money to eat fresh healthy foods, then you need to reconsider your priorities in life.

 

 

 



I read this earlier this month and it bears repeating often:

Dr. Anthony Heaney of UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and his team grew pancreatic cancer cells in lab dishes and fed them both glucose and fructose.  Tumor cells thrive on sugar but they used the fructose to proliferate. "Importantly, fructose and glucose metabolism are quite different," Heaney's team wrote.  Their finding, published in the journal Cancer Research, may help explain other studies that have linked fructose intake with pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest cancer types.

That is the biggest reason to avoid HFCS, it's stupid to look at the evidence and continue to poison onesself.




 



I dont think we can blame HFCS for growing obesity rates and increasing cases of diabetes.  Everyone wants something to blame and the real blame lies with each individual.  We are the ones who choose what goes into our bodies.  Its about time we stopped pointing the finger elsewhere and started taking responsibilities for our own choices.  I agree with you dpratz, that if you think you dont have time or money maybe your priorties need to be evaluated.



Although I agree that all refined sugar is not good for you, especially in the excessive amounts we tend to consume it, HFCS seems to be even worse, since fructose, especially in its refined form, is metabolized differently and seems to encourage the body to store fat and seems to make us hungrier, by affecting hunger hormones. HFCS is also found in foods that you wouldn't even think of as sweet, such as pickles, salad dressings, and breads!

I have an acquaintance who merely eliminated HFCS from her diet and lost over 200 pounds!  She was diligent, though, checking all labels carefully, and eating out only if she could be sure of the food.  It is not easy to avoid the stuff unless you avoid processed foods altogether.  It's also possible that some of us are more sensitive to the negative impact of HFCS than others.  Physiology and metabolism are very individual.

I am also concerned about children who live on processed food and, even in infancy, are suffering with obesity. (HFCS in formula could be part of the problem!) Fructose and Childhood Obesity

My neighbor works for one of the major soft drink producers, and he told me that because of public outcry they are taking HFCS out of some of their products.  We can make a difference in the food supply!



I didn't notice anyone mention the possibility of mercury-tainted high fructose corn syrup getting into foods, but I distinctly recall a series of news reports coming out in 2009 about it, like this one:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/01 /26/AR2009012601831.html

(an example -- just google "high fructose corn syrup" + "mercury")

Anyway, up to that point, I was merely avoiding HCFS because of it's presence in crappy processed foods... after seeing that research, however, I refused to touch HCFS with a ten food pole when I can help it...



Another problem with the processed food industry - a necessary staple of our lives, is sugar is a natural preservative that actually helps keep our food safe. Use of sugar decreases the amount of artifical and chemical preservatives ncessary to lessen contamination. Sugar breaks down the cell walls of living organisims that contaminate foods, thus it is in nearly every processed food that has a high water content. It's not that the processed food industry is trying to do bad things to us, they are just working with ...well, with what works.  I read lables, and when purchasing things like salad dressings, I go for the ones that are refrigerated and don't list sugars in their ingredients.  They taste better too.  But, they cost more, because  foods with less or no sugars have shorter expiration dates and require more expensive shipping, handling and storage.



We call HFCS "crack" in our house.  Because it is crack.  You have one taste and addiction follows.  There is no HFCS in our house. 

I also believe that would would be a more self-sustaining country if we cut the subsidies on corn, grew the high-nutrition foods that our citizens NEED, without Monsanto's GMO B.S., so that we can export our excess to the world and once again become a world player in the food market. 

Other countries don't want to buy our crap (and that's how they see HFCS and GMO products, crap or poison,) so why should we?



To joebirdsall's comment, "Eat less, exercise more" (truer words never spoken), I would also add, get used to unsweetened food.

Yesterday I saw a cooking show where the chef added sugar to a cabbage recipe. Americans and Canadians add sugar to ham, to turnips, to tomato sauce, to salad dressings. Why?

Italians from Italy (North American Italians eat differently) pretty much frown on adding sugar to anything but desserts. And they're much thinner than we are. They appreciate other flavours too, and don't need as much sweetness to appreciate a food.

Why not just try NOT to add sugar to something, maybe start with salad dressing, and go from there? Adjust your palate and maybe it won't be so hard.



buy foods with the least ingredients, ingredients you can read, no GMO foods. realize that products like these are not for the consumer but for corporations trying to cut corners and make profit.

This is also widely banned in many countries around the world.

People need to wake up and stop being so complacent and naive to what is going on not only in the world, but what is happening right in front of them...on the dinner plate!  Things are hidden in plain sight.



lol, tomatotomata. simply said.

Instead of focusing on HFCS, how about reducing the consumption of all sugar?

How about both? We pretty much ban hfcs but sugar consumption is pretty rare too. & more so every day. i used to drink 2 sodas w/ a meal. now i rarely have a soda w/ my meal & i can't finish a whole 1 by myself. i started eating better, more fruits & veggies, & the soda, even the ones made with real sugar & not hfcs, are just too sweet for me.



Original Post by: lillysgranny

What I have discovered personally is that the more I limit foods with added sweetener--whether it be sugar, hfcs, Splenda--the more satisfied my sweet tooth is with fruit.  Once you acquire a taste for overly, unnaturally sweet foods, the sweetness in an apple doesn't say "dessert" to your tastebuds.  By the same taken, if you will take the time to change your taste, after a while many excessively sweetened foods will be almost sickening.  That said, when I do indulge in sweetened foods, I avoid hfcs like the plague.


That's why I cut out the diet sodas, the artificial sweetener made me crave sweets all the more.  Now that I've lost the taste for it things like that seems sickeningly sweet to me, I can't stomach them.  I can taste it in everything, catsup, salad dressings, pasta sauces, it's grotesque how sweet everything tastes!  Fruit has become the perfect balance of sweetness.  The only thing I add any sweetener to is my teaspoon of raw honey in my green and white tea every morning.  Beyond that, I avoid sweeteners, especially artificial ones, like the plague!



It always makes me laugh when I see commercials purporting that xyz company uses "real cane sugar". I think most of the population is naive enough to believe that by ingesting "real cane sugar" instead of HFCS they are somehow doing their body a favor. It's all a marketing thing. They're just capitalizing off of peoples stupidity. I think my point here is that people need to just take responsibility for their own healthy well-being and cut down on the sugars completely. 



Original Post by: ninav

HFCS goes hand in hand with processed foods. Which in my opinion is the bottom line. Eat whole foods. The trouble is that no one has time to prepare them. We must demand better quality foods that are manufactured locally. That way they won't need so many food stabilzers to prolong the shelf life. It's all about greed. The companies don't want to suffer any loss so they pump the food full of additives to make them cheap and last long.


Yep, agreed. HFC is indisputably terrible for your body and has a huge part in the responsibility for the increase in overweight, processed food addict Americans.  It's companies trying to use cheap, addictive food products that have a long shelf life - it's got to stop!  People need to be educated and things have to change.  Just because things have been a certain way for a number of years doesn't mean it's right.

Eat REAL food! ;-)



To me HFCS is not so much the cause for obesity, but more importantly is related to diabetes and hypoglycemia. In my personal experience HFCS is like a rollercoaster for my pancreas. That being said eating healthier more balanced foods help.

I also avoid refined sugar, and use Blue Agave (in smaller amounts than I did sugar) in my coffee and iced tea. This seems to help me not have sugar drops, and in general I feel better and crave sugar less.



Just to clarify on Tumbleweedtundra's comment...

Sugar does not KILL microorganisms in our food, no more than salt does. Sweet things like Jam and salted dry things like deli meats tend to need less preservatives - TRUE- but not because these Kill anything. In both cases sugar and salt simply lower the "water activity" or availability of water because of the sheer amount of the salt or sugar in the product. This lower water availability means that the microorganisms (just like our body cells) effectively *dry up* or burst by natural causes - osmosis trying to establish balance between more water in the cell than in the Jam or cured meat. Simply DRYING the product (like pasta, rice and cereal) would achieve the same thing without all the sugar or salt. Choosing products with a lesser shelf life, like low sugar jams - or even better, making it yourself - and keeping it in the fridge where bacteria thrive at a much slower pace, is a better way of eating than just shrugging off the tons of sugar thinking its better than chemical preservatives... WHOLE FOODS ! No sugar and No chemicals! lets not let the companies ruin our eating habits simply because *it works*.



What alternatives could I use instead of sugar?



QUOTE:  Many Americans dislike HCFS for non-health reasons: the corn used is often genetically modified, they are not happy about cell and tissue damage in vetro, and the politics and environmental impact of intensive corn production are a concern. They are not waiting for scientific conclusions; they are speaking with their wallets now.

After reading Omnivore's Dilemma, I feel that I do not want to contribute to the proliferation of corn as a source of capital - it's bad for the economy, the farmers, consumers, animals, earth - there are no winners but the Monsanto's of this country.  Additionally, I prefer to ingest things that haven't been created in a laboratory.



Second paragraph: catchup?

 



I'm sorry, but that was hard to follow since the writer kept alternating between the correct acronym of HFCS and the mistake, HCFS.  Is there any way you can fix this post?



Honestly, HFCS and sugar in general wouldn't be that big of a deal if not for the fact America is slowly eating itself to death by consuming 2 to 3 times the amount of fat and calories that should normally be consumed for survival. 

We need to do a better job of teaching the importance of eating healthy and responsibly. Education leads to moderation. 



For me it's mostly a matter of taste.  Things made with real sugar (Mexican coca cola for example) taste way better than things made with HFCS.



For those allergic to corn and/or wheat, fructose/glucose, fructose, glucose - as they make it today, can cause various allergic reactions. Besides the potential for myself to suffer allergic reaction (and not the simple sniffles; we're talking moderate anaphylaxis), I have found that consumption of this 'created' sugar, turns off the "I'm full" trigger. The signal is totally turned off so you could drink an entire litre of pop and you don't feel "full". You may feel your stomach bulge from consuming that large a quantity of liquid but the "I feel full feeling" simply doesn't exist. There have been a number of studies on this and just about every study indicates this same effect however I have not seen the "why" behind it. Possibly it has something to do with the leptin issue however it would be nice to see some actual studies with the "why" answered because then you will have the evidence that sugar made from corn/wheat causes obesity.

If I have sugar (cane, maple, rice or beet sugar) foods, even cane sugar syrup, the feel full trigger remains in-tact. Its only when wheat/corn are used (which is the primary source for the creation of fructose, glucose, fructose/glucose today, does the trigger shut off.



When it come to sugar we don't need sweeter and more concentrated. Maybe all the data is not in yet, but it stands to reason that if you are taking in HFCS which is sweeter and more concentrated then you are getting sugar times 10 with every sip of drink or bite of food. Further food manufacturers have put HFCS in things that are not designed to be sweetened, like "Special K" diet cereal and breads? Come on! There is also substantial evidence that HFCS is addicting making one crave the food that it is in. This is why I think food manufacturers are putting it in everything under the sun, to boost sales. Lastly, the more sugar you consume or should I say over consume will bring on diabetes. You don't have to take my word for it check out this web site: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=436926300102&ref=t s This is written by Doctors and scientists.



Stuff like this is such a great reminder to me while in my weight loss journey. Although all the lbs are not gone yet, becoming knowledgeable about what I'm actually eating instead of just "counting" is going to give me my health, and that's what really counts to me.



I also agree that pointing the finger at HFCS isn't the answer.  Seriously, nobody is forcing it down our throats. 

And the whole excuse that people just don't have time to cook, is ridiculous on it's face.  If not even one person in a family has time to cook a healthy, nutritious meal for the family, then surely that family is too busy for facebook, video games, the boob tube and caloriecount. 



I avoid HFCS whenever possible. However, I was horrified to find it in the bottle of Nestea Iced Tea I had the other day. It tasted very sweet, and that caused me to look at the label. There just really aren't any healthy choices out there. I need to simply brew my own tea and carry it in a non-bpa bottle, and of course, filter my water to make the ice cubes (since the fluoride in our water seems to be loaded with arsenic and lead).



I found it much easier to get rid of weight by eating like the kid I was in the late 50s-60s. No processed  foods,just  fresh or frozen fruits & veggies,fish & lean meats. If I want  mac & cheese, a pie,cake,coleslaw, & other dishes you see full of preservatives,etc make 'em all  from scratch,so you know what's in them & don't buy or eat anything without a nutritional label.. No sodas at all. I do use splenda & eat as little sugar as possible. I do have my ice cream & chocolate(dark only) treats periodically but nothing in excess.



For me, the main reason of getting away from high fructose corn syrup is that I, as a consumer, want to not buy anything genetically modified.  I am against corporations being able to get a patent on a form of life and wanting to replace all of the world's natural crops with their less healthy, cancer promoting, and worse for the environment GMO crops.   The thought that one day our natural crops could be extinct truly worries me (and some crops already ARE extinct).  Natural foods have 6-7 times the nutrients that GMO foods have which contain important anti oxidants for fighting off cancer, among other health benefits.  Don't we want our future generations to have these foods ?  

For people with little time to prepare healthy food, you should look into restaurants or carry out type restaurants that prepare organics.   I have a local restaurant called "Lean Green Cuisine" that prepares 75-80% organics and they change their menu up once a week to keep a meal variety.  It's GREAT because I get the convenience of "eating out" and get to put my wallet towards a product I believe in:  our only planet.



The only crime related to HFCS is the criminal use of taxpayer money to subsidize the corn industry.  The subsidies have made it relatively cheap to sweeten practically everything. 

Consumer demand has driven companies to sweeten everything.  As we see here, the market works. Consumers are effectively boycotting HFCS, however they still desire "sweet" taste.  HFCS will merely be replaced by substitutes such as sugar, honey or other artificial sweeteners.



There should never have been a patent on a plant gene, because now the people who own the patent have motivation to get into the govt. and subsidize their own product.  Meanwhile there "sick" plants are being harvested and migrating around by other means (wind, birds, bees, etc).



I think humans naturally love sweet things.  Think about how sweet breast milk is - and how newborns much prefer it to water or any other substitute.  

I have had great success losing weight and not missing sugar so much by eating super-sweet tasting fruits like watermelon, ripe fresh pineapple, ripe honeydew melon and ripe cantaloupe.  I am amazed at how much less satisfying and sweet these foods are after they are processed.

I do agree that your taste for sugar and added sweeteners adjusts over time when you eat more whole foods.  I also agree with enlightenup2002 - all things in moderation.  I wouldn't want to completely eliminate sugar, because it is a great, delicious thing to eat now and then.



Original Post by: kay_h

I also agree that pointing the finger at HFCS isn't the answer.  Seriously, nobody is forcing it down our throats. 

And the whole excuse that people just don't have time to cook, is ridiculous on it's face.  If not even one person in a family has time to cook a healthy, nutritious meal for the family, then surely that family is too busy for facebook, video games, the boob tube and caloriecount. 


love this quote above!

totally agree with the many posts suggesting that reducing consumption of processed foods can eliminate much of the HFCS in our lives.

About the time needed to cook fresh food:

Yesterday, we had pasta and brussel sprouts for dinner. took about 10 minutes to boil them both. 

I chopped some fresh tomatoes with garlic, basil, salt, pepper and olive oil, nuked it for 2 minutes and put it over the pasta. It probably took about as long to make that as it would have taken to pour a jar of (corn syrup filled!) spagetti sauce in a bowl and microwave it!

Laura



Original Post by: mrsdobday

I read this earlier this month and it bears repeating often:

Dr. Anthony Heaney of UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and his team grew pancreatic cancer cells in lab dishes and fed them both glucose and fructose.  Tumor cells thrive on sugar but they used the fructose to proliferate. "Importantly, fructose and glucose metabolism are quite different," Heaney's team wrote.  Their finding, published in the journal Cancer Research, may help explain other studies that have linked fructose intake with pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest cancer types.

That is the biggest reason to avoid HFCS, it's stupid to look at the evidence and continue to poison onesself.




 


Not that I'm advocating HFCS, but please be aware that HFCS does not equal fructose. 

The conclusions of that study may be sound, but fructose is present in many, many fruits and vegetables.  By your rationale, with which you are linking the 'evidence' in that study to 'poisoning oneself,' you are linking only fructose to 'poisoning oneself.'  I'm not giving up apples because that study links fructose to pancreatic cancer.  And they never specifically state anything about HFCS in your blurb, so your reference may be misguided in the first place.

Overreactions, sweeping generalizations, jumps to conclusions, and misleading statements don't do anyone any favors.  So everyone, just keep yourselves informed and make sure when reading studies and quote about studies, as above, that you're comparing (fructose-bearing) apples to apples and not apples to oranges.



For some reason Kosher Coke, that is Coke made with cane sugar, tastes better than regular Coke, so says the guy that drinks way too much Coke.

What I found odd was yesterday I had the stomach flu and had to eat Popsicles and my brain is trying to tell me that it's bad to eat the sugar in them even though I couldn't eat anything else at the time. 

I think we over think a lot of this.



Regardless of whether fructose "causes" obesity, I would simply like the option of buying foods (including dried fruit) that isn't sweetened.  If I don't want it, and it adds needless calories, why should I have to include it in my shopping?

 

As we all know, when you're counting calories, they add up pretty quickly. How many could we save if our foods weren't pre-sweetened?



Original Post by: tysonius

Regardless of whether fructose "causes" obesity, I would simply like the option of buying foods (including dried fruit) that isn't sweetened.  If I don't want it, and it adds needless calories, why should I have to include it in my shopping?

 

As we all know, when you're counting calories, they add up pretty quickly. How many could we save if our foods weren't pre-sweetened?


I also find it obnoxious that just about all dried fruit has added sweeteners.  I don't pour sugar all over my bananas or apples or pineapples or grapes, why would I want it caked all over my fried fruit?!



This video changed my life! If you want to know more about what HFCS is doing to your body. this is a must watch....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM



Original Post by: radioactive-hamster

For some reason Kosher Coke, that is Coke made with cane sugar, tastes better than regular Coke, so says the guy that drinks way too much Coke.

What I found odd was yesterday I had the stomach flu and had to eat Popsicles and my brain is trying to tell me that it's bad to eat the sugar in them even though I couldn't eat anything else at the time. 

I think we over think a lot of this.


 A lot of people seem to not be absorbing the fact that HFCS is only about  10 percent more fructose than SUGAR, yes even your special raw sugar hand-picked in Guam.  These arguments which say that HFCS is bad but sugar is OK sound pretty silly.


Adding sweeteners are bad, but so are a lot of things.



Um, cane sugar is 99% sucrose - not 50%. So far as I know, most countries don't use corn-derived sugars much (or at all), the US does because of the huge subsidies the corn industry gets.


See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_cane



Original Post by: karibeth70

I dont think we can blame HFCS for growing obesity rates and increasing cases of diabetes.  Everyone wants something to blame and the real blame lies with each individual.  We are the ones who choose what goes into our bodies.  Its about time we stopped pointing the finger elsewhere and started taking responsibilities for our own choices.  I agree with you dpratz, that if you think you dont have time or money maybe your priorties need to be evaluated.


It's not a matter of Blaming any particular thing like HFCS. We as a society are so acustomed to convience and most packaged foods contain sugar.  Sugar is addicting; therefore, it is important for everyone to recognize the imbalance of sugars (all sugars) in our diet.  Not to mention the beverages that are consumed on a daily basis that contain Sugar! Your right karibeth, becoming educated and making healthy choices is really a personal goal we should all take responsibility for.



The corn that is made into HFCS is heavily treated with herbicides, pesticides, fertizers and other agricultural chemicals.  It is also likely to be genetically modified.  It is grown in massive quantities over miles and miles of othewise fertile countryside in the U.S.  Some of the techniques used in the farming of corn allow millions of tons of this precious topsoil to be blown away by wind or washed away by water...and continued usage of synthetic chemicals depletes the natural fertility of the soils.  It is first of all a gross waste and misuse of our soil resources in the United States.

The government, of course, subsidizes the production of corn as though, without it, farmers could not survive.  When demand is actually low, there is increased push to find "new" ways to market and to use the corn crop that is propped up by the government's subsidies.

Now, if CORN were not being produced and marketed so abundantly and vigorously, where would we put all that technology, and all those (pricey) agricultural chemicals?  I believe the push behind the over-zealous inclusion of CORN products and high fructose corn syrup in so much manufactured and marketed processed foods is because it is profitable for the companies that produce and market the chemicals that make that corn-production possible.

What would happen if the public grew more aware of what HCFS is and began questioning its use in so many foods and food "products"?   Would the agri-chemical companies not rev into action and initiate a propaganda campaign to "assure" the public that all the hype and avoidance is nonsense?  Wouldn't they try to convince us that HFCS is a "natural" product--and "fine, in moderation"--with the same number of calories as sugar?  Seems I've already heard that somewhere.  Hmmmmm....



I would like to read some information on the ethical issue dealing with the growing practices of corn.

 How many acres of corn are grown in a rotation with crops that help build the soil.  Are cover and manure crops used to add vital nutrients into the soil, as I do believe that corn as a crop is "very hard" on the soil.  Also, how many pounds of oil based pesticides and fertilizers are used each year.  

It is hard to imagine that farmland is used to grow a product that is shipped by the tanker loads around the country that is used to make our processed food.  Why not grow real food that can be eaten?  



As the parent of a 7yr old with ADD (NOT ADHD) and he is also an Aspie, I have proven (in my chld-not scientific) that HFCS makes him hyper. I removed all HFCS and corn poducts from his diet and he changed. NO MEDS just the removal of HFCS and he can sit & focus on task & school. The difference is night & day when he eats or drinks something containing HFCS...it's like rocket fuel for his system.

Like I said not scientific but his doctor saw the difference when he was corn free for  2 weeks and she gave hima Flu shot, (they havev a sucrose base) and he went hyper nuts in the office you just couldn't slow him down, he was actually going in circles around the exam table.

Corn & corn products are hrad for the human body to digest and I (we) avoid them as much as posible.



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